“Dan Dan Kokoro Hikareteku” (Dragon Ball GT Theme)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

I am back with something I haven’t done in about a year: parse anime opening lyrics. Here we have the iconic opening from Dragon Ball GT, which is probably the only worthwhile thing to come from the show.

[I’m making 3 edits, which you will see in brackets [] and italics and the original with a strikethrough A special thanks to @grapefruitcake for always pointing things out and keeping me on my toes in these matters.]

This is going to be an entire parsing in one go.


DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
その眩しい笑顏に
果てない暗闇 から 飛び出そう  Hold my hand

君と出合った時
子供のころ大切に想っていた景色 を思い出したんだ
僕と踊ってくれないか
光と彩 のWinding Road, 今でもあいつに 夢中なの?
少しだけ 振り向きたくなるような時もあるけど
愛と勇氣と誇りを 持って戦うよ

DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
この宇宙の希望のかけら
きっと誰もが永遠を手に人れたい
ZEN ZEN 気にしないフリしても
ほら君に戀してる
果てない暗闇から飛びだそう  Hold your hand

怒った顏も疲れてる君も好きだげど
あんなに飛ばして生きて大丈夫かなと思う
僕は…何気ないしぐさに踏み回されてる
Sea Side Blue
それでもあいつに夢中なの?
もっと聞きたいことかあったのに
二人の会話か車の音にはばまれて通りに舞うよ

DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
自分でも不思議なんだけど
何かあるとすぐに君に電話したくなる
ZEN ZEN 気のないフリしても
結局君のことだけ見ていた
海の彼方へ飛ぴ出そうよ Hold my hand

The first order of business is to get everything into Romaji. I promise that it’s all transliterated into the same format of verses and stanzas as I have above.

1.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
Sono mabushii eigao [egao] ni
Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold my hand”

2.
Kimi to deatta toki
Kodomo no koro taisetsu ni motteita basho wo omoidashitanda
Boku to odotte kurenai ka
hikari to kage no “winding road”, ima demo aitsu ni muchuu nano
Sukoshi dake furimukitakunaru youna toki mo aru kedo
Ai to yuuki to hokori wo motte tatakau yo

3.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
kono uchuu no kibou no kakera
Kitto daremo ga eien wo te ni iretai
Zen Zen ki ni shinai furi shitemo
Hora kimi ni koi shiteru
Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold your hand”

4.
Okotta kao mo tsukareteru kimi mo suki da kedo
Anna ni tobashiteikite daijoubu ka na to omou
Boku wa nanigenai shigusa ni furimawasareteru
”Sea Side Blue”
Sore demo aitsu ni muchuu nano
motto kikitai koto ga atta no ni
Futari no kaiwa ga kuruma no noto ni habamarete toori ni mau yo

5.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
Jibundemo fushigi nanda kedo
Nanika aru to ichisugu ni kimi ni denwa shitakunaru
Zen Zen ki no nai furi shitemo
Kekkyoku kimi no koto dake miteita
Umi no kanata he tobidasou yo “Hold my hand”

1.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

Dan Dan is an onomatopoeia meaning “slowly.”

Kokoro is a noun meaning “heart” in the metaphorical sense, so not the organ.

Hikareteku is a contraction of “hikarete iku.” “Hikarete” is the Te-form, henceforth called the participle form, of “hikareru,” which means “to be charmed.” “Iku” is a verb meaning “to go.” What it is doing here is functioning similarly to “Iru” in the “te iru” construction, i.e. the periphrastic present progressive. The agent of this verb takes the Ni particle.

Sono mabushii eigao [egao] ni (By that radiant smile)

Sono is an adjective (adjective! gasp!) meaning “that.”

Mabushii is a so-called i-adjective, which is actually a verb, conjugated for the present, meaning “radiant.” It modifies the next word.

Eigao is a noun meaning “smile.”

Ni is an ablative particle. Here it functions as an “ablative of agent.”

Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold my hand” (Let us jump out of this darkness that does not end. Hold my hand.)

Hatenai is the present, negative conjugation of the verb “hateru,” which means “to end.” Because it precedes a noun, it means that this verb, the sole constituent of this inflexional phrase, it modifies the noun.

Kurayami is a noun meaning “darkness.” So this is the “darkness that does not end.”

Kara is a post-position that means movement away from. It’s usually translated as “from,” but because of the main verb in this phrase, it’d be prudent to use a stronger translation. I’ve chosen “out of.”

Tobidasou is a conjunction of two verbs: “Tobi” and “Dasu.” “Tobi” means “to leap” or “to fly.” “Dasu” is a verb meaning “to take out” or “to bring something out.” Together they mean “to jump out.”

2.

Kimi to deatta toki (When I met you)

Kimi is a 2nd person singular pronoun. It’s not a formal pronoun and tends to refer to males. The context of this song leads me to believe that it’s in this case referring to a woman.

to is a post-position. It tends to be translated as “with,” but its function is to state that the noun accompanies something else in an operation, an operation described with the verb.

Deatta is a verb conjugated for the past, affirmative meaning “to meet by chance” (describing meeting someone unexpectedly for the first time.) These three words make up an inflexional phrase. Since it precedes a noun, it modifies the noun.

Toki is a noun meaning “time.” When it has an IP modifying it, it tends to be translated as “When [IP].”

Kodomo no koro taisetsu ni motteita basho wo omoidashita n da (It is that I remember a place that I held fondly (dear) when I was a child.)

Komodo is a noun meaning “child”

no is a genitive particle. “X no Y” tends to be translated, thus, as “Y of X.”

Koro is a noun meaning “time.” It takes the genitive to describe the time exact period, so in this case it’s the “time as a child”

Taisetsu is a noun meaning “important” or “fond.” In English it has an adjectival meaning but it is grammatically a noun in English.

ni is a suffix that makes the noun an adverb.

Motteita is a past progressive verb in the style of “hikareteku” in that the main verb is “iku.” “Motte” is the participial form of “motsu,” which means “to hold.”

Basho is a noun meaning “place.”

wo is an accusative particle. So this is the object of the next verb.

Omoidashita is a verb conjugated in the affirmative perfect (past) meaning “to remember.”

n is functionally a noun (I believe) but it carries no meaning in itself. All it does is allow us to use an IP as a noun. Here you’ll see me use the “It is” translation just to give it some representation.

Da is our copula, conjugated for the present, affirmative.

Boku to odotte kurenai ka (Will you dance with [me]?)

Boku is a first person singular pronoun, tends to denote masculinity.

to is the same “to” we saw before.

Odotte is the participial form of the verb “Odoru,” which means “to dance.” It’s in the participial form because it works alongside the next verb.

Kurenai is a verb conjugated in the negative, present meaning “to give.” When it is paired with the participial form of a verb, it means “to give (the speaker) X,” i.e. to do something for the speaker’s benefit. It’s in the negative conjugation because in an interrogative sentence, the negative can be an invitation.

ka is an interrogative particle. So this is the speaker asking to something.

Hikari to kage no WINDING ROAD, ima demo aitsu ni muchuu nano (On the winding road of light and shadow, even now [does there exist] a daze [in you] by that person]?)

Hikari is a noun meaning “light.”

to is the same as before.

Kage is a noun meaning “shadow.”

no is the same as before.

“Winding road” is English.

Imademo is an adverb meaning “even now.” It’s made up of the adverb “ima,” meaning “now,” and the conjunction “demo,” meaning “but.”

Aitsu is a 3rd person singular pronoun meaning “that person.”

ni is the same marker as before with basically the same function of agency. The difference here is that there is no verb.

Muchuu is a noun meaning “daze.”

Nano is a sentence ending that is a casual feminine version of “da ka.” So it’s a copula and an interrogative ending particle.

(Because there is no verb, we are going to write a faithful translation that’s clunky as all hell. What you’d want to do for a smoother translation is to make “muchuu” a verb.)

Sukoshi dake furimukitakunaru youna toki mo aru kedo (Despite there even being just a few times when I want to start to turn [start to want to turn] around)

Sukoshi is an adverb meaning “a little bit”

Dake is a restrictive noun suffix meaning “only”

Furimukitakunaru is a lot of things at once. We’ll look at things one by one. We’re looking at a conjunction of verbs that ends in “naru.” “Xnaru” tends to mean “to become” or “to start Xing.” “Taku” is the adverbial form of the “tai” conjugation of verbs. “Tai” is the desiderative mood, meaning it expresses desire. So “takunaru” is about “starting to want to” do something. Now we just have to deal with the meat and potatoes: “furimuki,” which is the stem of the verb “furimuku,” which means “to turn around.” So the whole thing means “to want to start to turn around.”

Youna is a na-adjective (but actually a verb) meaning “similar to.” It doesn’t have any meaning in itself, but connects an IP and a Noun, where the noun is “like” the IP.

Toki is the same as before. But “youna” is going to require us to translate it as “time” and not as “when.” We’ll say it is a “time like I wanted to turn around.”

Mo is a post-position that gets translated as “even.” It can be called a “supplemental” marker as well since it designates that the noun is not the only thing that can be the object of the verb.

aru is a copula. It and “iru” get translated often as “there is”

kedo is a conjugation that translates to “despite.”

Ai to yuuki to hokori wo motte tatakau yo (I hold onto love and courage and pride and fight!)

Ai is a noun meaning “love.”

to is the same as before

Yuuki is a noun meaning “courage.”

to is the same as before.

Hokori is a noun meaning “pride.”

wo is the same as before.

Motte is the participial form of “motsu,” meaning “to hold.” Using the pariticipial form before a definite verb is a way of conjoining those two verbs. So you do them both at the same time or in immediate succession.

Tatakau is a present, affirmative verb meaning “to fight.”

yo is an emphatic ending particle.

3.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

kono uchuu no kibou no kakera (The fragments of the hope of this universe)

Kono is an an adjective meaning “this”

Uchuu is a noun meaning “the universe”

no is the same as before.

Kibou is a noun meaning “hope.”

no is the same as before.

Kakera is a noun meaning “fragments”

Kitto daremo ga eien wo te ni iretai (Surely everybody wants to obtain eternity.)

Kitto is an adverb meaning “surely.”

daremo is a 3rd person plural pronoun meaning “everybody.”

ga is a nominative particle, meaning that it indicates the subject of the sentence.

Eien is a noun meaning “eternity.”

wo is the same as before.

Te is a noun meaning “hand.”

ni is the same as before.

iretai is the desiderative mood, present affirmative of the verb “ireru,” meaning “to put in.” The expression “te ni ireru” means “to obtain.” So we’ll translate it as such and not as “to put a hand in.”

Zen Zen ki ni shinai furi shitemo (Even if [I] pretend to not care at all)

Zen Zen is an adverb meaning “wholly.” When the verb it modifies is conjugated for negativity, we get “wholly not…” which normally gets translated to “not … at all.”

Ki is a noun meaning “energy.” It is going to be part of an expression.

ni is the same particle as before.

Shinai is the present, negative conjugation of the verb “suru.” “Ki ni suru” is an expression meaning “to care.”

Furishite is the participial form of “furi suru,” which means “to pretend.”

mo is the same as before. With this participle, it is a circumstantial clause, translating to “even if.”

Hora kimi ni koi shiteru (Look! I am in love with you.)

Hora is an interjection meaning “Look!”

Kimi is the same as before.

ni is the same as before, but here more of an ablative of accompaniment. So we’ll translate it as “with.”

koi is a noun meaning “love,” in a romantic sense.

shiteru is a contraction of “shite iru,” which is the present progressive conjugation of the verb “suru.” “Koi suru” means “to love.”

Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold your hand” (Let us jump out of this darkness that does not end. Hold your hand.)

4.

Okotta kao mo tsukareteru kimi mo suki da kedo (Although I even like [your] face that got angry and even you when you are tired)

Okotta is the verb “okoru,” conjugated for the past, affirmative, meaning “to be angry.” This verb modifies the noun it precedes.

Kao is a noun meaning “face.”

mo is the same as before. It is substituting a nominative marker.

Tsukareteru is a contraction of “tsukarete iru,” meaning it is the present progressive of “tsukareru,” meaning “to get tired.”

Kimi is the same as before.

mo is the same as before. Both nouns, “kimi” and “kao” are the the subjects of the sentence.

Suki is a noun meaning “the thing that I like.” So here’s the deal. “X ga suki” tends to be translated as “[I] like X.” That words perfectly fine; but don’t get the idea that “suki” in Japanese is a verb just because of the translation.

Da is the copula conjugated for the present, affirmative.

Kedo is the same as before. Here we’re going to translate it as “Although.”

Anna ni tobashite ikite daijoubu ka na to omou (I wonder if living going fast to this extent is alright.)

Anna is an adjective (gasp) meaning “such.”

ni is the adverbial suffix. “Anna ni,” thus means “suchly” or, more colloqually, “to this/that extent.”

Tobashite is the participial form of the verb “tobasu.” “Tobasu” is the transitive counterpart of “tobu.” “Tobasu” does not only mean “to fly” but also “to go fast,” among other things. It is in the participial form because it is being compounded with “ikite”

ikite is the participial form of “ikiru,” which means “to live.” It is in the participial form because the following noun tends to take the participial form has its subject. (This happens sometimes.)

Daijoubu is a noun meaning “okay” or “alright.” What’s alright? The preceding IP.

ka is the interrogative ending particle.

Na is a dubitative ending particle.

to is the quotative particle.

Omou is a verb conjugated for the present, affirmative, meaning “to think [about something.]” or “to wonder” or “to consider.” Anything that appeals to the noetic should work just fine.

Boku wa nanigenai shigusa ni furimawasareteru (I am spun around by your casual actions)

Boku is the same as before.

wa is a topic marker.

Nanigenai is an i-adjective (but actually a verb) conjugated for the present, affirmative, meaning “casual.”

Shigusa is a noun meaning “action.” Here we will translate it as “actions.”

ni is the object marker for passive verbs.

Furimawasareteru is the passive, progressive, affirmative of “furimawasu” in a contracted state. “Furimawasu” means “for one’s steps to turn around” or “to spin around”

”Sea Side Blue”

Sore demo aitsu ni muchuu nano (Even still, [does there exist] a daze [in you] by that person]?)

Sore is a noun meaning “that thing.”

Demo is the same as before. This is another expression, “sore demo,” meaning “even so.”

Aitsu ni Muchuu Nano is the same as before.


Motto kikitai koto ga atta no ni (Despite me wanting to hear more.)

Motto is an adverb meaning “more.”

Kikitai is the verb “kiku,” meaning “to hear,” conjugated in the desiderative, present, affirmative. [grapefruitcake made the wise observation that “kiku” can also mean “to ask,” and you can translate it as such and it’s a legitimate option; but which way we’re supposed to take it ultimately is unknown because we’re not given much more context.]

Koto is a noun meaning “thing.”

ga is our subject marker.

Atta is a copula, “aru,” conjugated for the past, affirmative.

no is the same as the “n” we saw before. It makes an IP a noun.

ni is a conjunction. “No ni” translates to “despite [IP]

Futari no kaiwa ga kuruma no oto ni habamarete toori ni mau yo (Our conversation was interrupted by the sounds of cars and dances in the street.)

Futari is a noun meaning “two people,” in this context “the two of us.”

no is the genitive marker.

Kaiwa is a noun meaning “conversation.” So “our conversation”

ga is the same as before.

Kuruma is a noun meaning “car.”

no is the same as before.

Oto is a noun meaning “sound.” So “the sound of cars.”

ni is the marker for the object of a passive verb.

Habamarete is the passive, participial conjugation of the verb “habamu,” meaning “to interrupt.” What I will suggest here is that this participle be connected with the verb “mau” and that “toori ni” be taken as a separate Noun Phrase.

Toori is a noun meaning “street.”

ni is again a locative ablative. So it is telling us where all this is taking place.

Mau is a verb conjugated for the present, affirmative meaning “to dance.” “Odoru” traditionally means “to hop,” and “Mau” is more of a whirling thing. So that’s the nuance. What I believe is being suggested in this verse is that the conversation because one of many sounds on the street.

yo is the same as before.

5.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

Jibun demo fushigi nanda kedo (Even though assuredly [it] is a miracle to me myself.)

Jibun is a first person, singular, reflexive pronoun meaning “myself.” It tends to be used as the indirect object. So we’ll use it as such.

demo is the same as before. Yet again, we have another expression: “Jibundemo,” meaning “I myself.”

fushigi is a noun meaning “miracle.”

nanda is an expression meaning “assuredly,” or can be translated verbally (WITH CAUTION) as “I’m sure.”

kedo is the same as before.

Nanika aru to ichusugu ni kimi ni denwa shitakunaru (If there is anything (if anything comes up), [i] Immediately want to start to call [start to want to call] you.)

Nanika is a pronoun meaning “anything.”

aru is a copula conjugated for the present, affirmative.

to is a conditional conjunction meaning “if.” It’s a very strong “if,” as well. So “X to, Y” implies that once X happens, Y will definitely happen

ichisugu is an adverb meaning “immediate.”

ni is the same adverb marker as before. So “immediately.”

kimi is the same as before.

ni is the indirect object marker.

denwa is a noun meaning “phone.” It’s also the direct object of the verb; but the direct object marker tends to be dropped or perhaps never existed in the first place.

shitakunaru is a verb mirroring another we’ve already seen before, because it is the adverbial form of the desiderative conjugation plus “naru,” which means “I want to start to X.” In this case, the verb is “suru.” The expression “denwa suru” means “to call by phone.”

Zen Zen ki no nai furi shitemo (Even if I pretend to be wholly indifferent.)

Ki no nai is the only difference between this verse and the fourth verse of the third starza. “Ki no nai” is an expression that means “indifferent,” or “half-hearted.”

Kekkyoku kimi no koto dake miteita (In the end, [I] was looking only at you.)

Kekkyoku is an adverb meaning “in the end.”

kimi is the same as before.

no is the genitive particle. (It might be the participle of the copula, but I’m not entirely sure it makes much of a difference right now. I also want to say that all genitive markers are just participles of the copula, but that’s another story.)

koto is the same as before. “Kimi no koto” translates “thing of you,” but it means “you.”

dake is the same as before.

miteita is the past, progressive, affirmative of “miru,” which means “to look at.”

Umi no kanata he tobidasou yo “Hold my hand” (Let us jump towards the other side of the ocean. Hold my hand.)

Umi is a noun meaning “ocean.”

no is the genitive particle.

kanata is a noun meaning “that way,” or, if you want to be technical, “the side that is not closest to here.” Here we can translate it at “the other side.”

he (which tends to be pronounced e, mind you) it a locative particle, which identifies motion towards. So the verb will be working towards this “other side of the ocean.”

tobidasou is the same as before. Here we can omit the “out” in our translation. Otherwise we would have to say “Let’s jump out [of one place] [and]…”

yo is the same as before.

“Hold my hand” is English.