Lucky Star! Episode 1 (Part 1)

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Hello, friends! We are back, getting ready to tackle our first anime episode. The show’s called Lucky Star! and it’s a classic slice of life show. I’ve chosen Lucky Star! as our starter show because when you watch the show, they speak slowly enough that it’s easy to understand. Also, there’s no in-world lingo to learn as there is in shows like Naruto and One Piece. So the vocabulary you pick up here will be worth memorizing for other shows.

We’re going to start off with a super short lesson, the lines that are said before the opening theme, which we will not be covering (I’ll explain later).

こなた:さあ 始まるざますよ

みゆき:行くでがんす

つかさ:フンガー

かがみ:まともに始めなさいよ!

Four lines, that’s it!

こなた:さあ 始まるざますよ
(Konata: Saa hajimaru zamasu yo)

Konata is the small, blue-haired leader of the group.

さあ (saa): is an interjection, meaning “so…”

始まる (hajimaru): is a verb, meaning “to begin”. Fun fact, it is specifically the intransitive version of “to begin” if we were to start something, we’d use the verb 始める (hajimeru), exactly the same except in the hiragana.

ざます (zamasu): is an auxiliary verb, and in fact an archaic verb, meaning “to be”. It is a copula. As far as translation is concerned, we cannot do much with it without warping the syntax. But what it does is indicate that we are in a certain state, in this case a state of starting.

よ (yo): is an ending particle. It intensifies and informs one of the facts of the sentence.

“So, we’re starting!”

みゆき:行くでがんす
(Miyuki: Ikude gansu)

Miyuki is the pink-haired “little miss perfect” of the show.

行く(iku): is a verb that means “to go”.

で (de): is the Te-form of the copula だ (da).

がんす (gansu): is particular to the Hiroshima dialect. It is what in standard Japanese is said as “gozaimasu”. Gansu and Gozaimasu are the humble ways of saying “aru”, one of the three main Japanese copulas.

“We’re going.”

つかさ:フンガー
(Tsukasa: fungaa)

Tsukasa is the short-haired, purple-haired, sweet and naïve one. She’s also the younger of the two fraternal twins.

This is just an exclamation. It has no meaning grammatically. But for a translation we can change it to something more English-y.

“Gollee”

かがみ:まともに始めなさいよ!
(Kagami: Matomoni hajimenasai yo!)

Kagami is the long-haired, purple-haired, cynical one. She’s the older of the two fraternal twins. And these four girls are our protagonists.

まともに (matomoni): Is an adverb. Matomo is “normal”, as in normal like a square is normal, direct and simple. the Ni is the suffix that makes it an adverb. What Matomoni means is something like “alright!” as in “I’ve had enough of this!”

始めなさい (hajimenasai): is the imperative form of Hajimeru, which we talked about as being the transitive form of “Hajimaru”. So now we’re starting something. What? Well, the opening song, of course!

よ (yo): is the same “yo” from last time, just adding some emphasis.

“Alright! Start [it]!”

Translation:

“So, we’re starting!”
“We’re going.”
“Gollee”
“Alright! Start it!”

Things to Memorize:

始まる
始める

In part 2, we’ll jump right into the first little scene.