Lucky Star! Episode 1 (Part 21)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

This next scene takes place in Tsukasa and Kagami’s house. The things in parentheses are things that Kagami hears while she is asleep and that we do not see either (becasue we’re following her perspective).Here we have a new character, through we don’t see her: かがみのお母さん, which is Kagami’s (and Tsukasa’s) mother. That’s all it means. Don’t be alarmed. haha

かがみのお母さん:(こなたちゃん、いらっしゃい。)
つさか:(お姉ちゃんのお見舞いに来てくれたの。)
かがみのお母さん:(あら わざわざありがとう。)
こなた:(いえ お邪魔しまーす。)
こなた:かがみって意外にかわいい寝顔してんだ。
かがみ:何だよ!何しに来たんだよ!帰れよ!
こなた:起きた起きた。
かがみ:え? お見舞い? あんたが?私のためにわざわざ?
こなた:そうだよ。
かがみ:でーでも、うつしたらにくいしさ、気持ちだけ貰うわよ。
かがみ:ちぇ… 何よ? 嬉しいじゃない。新型のウィルスとか流行ってるから、心配してくれてるのか。いつもゲームやアニメの事しか考えてないと思ったけどちょっと感動しちゃったじゃない。
こなた:ほら、この前出た宿題とか見せて貰いたいし、あといい寝顔見せて貰ったし気にしなくていいって。
かがみ:かえれ!

かがみのお母さん:(こなたちゃん、いらっしゃい。)
(Kagami no okaasan: (Konata-chan, Irasshai. )

こなたちゃん (Konata-chan): is Konata’s name and the address suffix we saw before. (See Part 20)

いらっしゃい (irasshai): is an interjection meaning “welcome!” It’s the verbal stem, or participle, of “irassharu,” which is the honorific verb for “to come” and “to go.”

Translation: “Konata, welcome!”

つさか:(お姉ちゃんのお見舞いに来てくれたの。)
(Tsukasa: O-nee-chan no omimai ni kite kureta no.)

お姉ちゃん (o-nee-chan): is the honorific way of saying “older sister” with the “chan” address suffix. This is a bit of anime logic, I’m afraid, where people are addressed funnily.

の (no): is the genitive particle. We’ll be translating it as “on” in this case.

お見舞い (omimai): is a noun meaning “to visit a person who is ill” or “to check up on someone who is ill.” The object of this noun takes the genitive; that’s all.

に (ni): is the dative particle, here expressing purpose.

来て (kite): is the Te-form of the verb “kuru,” meaning “to come.” So Konata came to check up on the older sister. (For the record, Tsukasa and Kagami are twins, but Kagami was the first to come out… So she’s the older one.)

くれた (kureta): is the affirmative, past conjugation of “kureru,” meaning “to give.” This is part of a very popular series of expressions. “Vte kuru” means “(For the subject) to V for someone’s benefit.” In this case, the omitted subject is Konata, who has come to visit Kagami.

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix we saw before. (See Part 19) Sometimes sentences end with this (as is the case in “dou shita no.”) In your translation you’re allowed to disregard it because it won’t make much sense in English. Semantically it seems to soften things.

Translation: “[Konata] came to pay Kagami [i.e. older sister] a visit.”

かがみのお母さん:(あら わざわざありがとう。)
(Kagami no okaasan: (Ara wazawaza arigatou.)

あら (ara): is an interjection meaning “oh!”

わざわざ (wazawaza): is an adverb meaning “with much effort,” referring to someone’s actions done intentionally for some goal. There are some things not being expressed in this sentence; but what this is referring to is Konata having come over. (She seems to live far away; or at least everybody is being very gracious about her visit.)

ありがとう (arigatou): is an expression meaning “thank you.”

Translation: “Oh, thank you for the trouble.”

こなた:(いえ お邪魔しまーす。)
(Konata: (Ie o-jama shimaasu.)

いえ (ie): is an interjection meaning “No” or “not at all,” when used in response to niceties. For those who want to speak Japanese, answering questions in Japanese with “ie” can be kind of rough, so use with caution.

お邪魔 (o-jama): is the honorific prefix “o” and the noun “jama,” which means “bother” or “disturbance.”

しまーす (shimaasu): is just “shimasu,” the polite, affirmative, present conjugation of “suru.” Here we’ll note that Japanese’s present tense is actually present/future, meaning that it can take place either in the present or in the future. Here it’s taking place in the future. Japanese has a few expressions that have “shimasu” in it where one sustains the /a/ while performing the action. “Ojama shimasu” means “I will disturb” and is used when entering someone else’s house. So when you do so, after being greeted and all that, as you go in you can sustain the /a/ for a little bit as you start moving it. “Shitsurei shimasu” is the same, where you sustain that /a/ as you walk in for a little bit.

Translation: “I will disturb” or “I’m coming in!”

こなた:かがみって意外にかわいい寝顔してんだ。
(Konata: Kagami tte igai ni kawaii negao shite-n da. )

かがみ (Kagami): is Kagami.

って (tte): is our casual topical marker. (See Part 20)

意外 (igai): Is a noun meaning “unexpected” or “surprising.”

に (ni): is the adverbial suffix, making “igai” an adverb: “surprisingly.”

かわいい (kawaii): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “cute.”

寝顔 (negao): is a noun meaning “sleeping face.” That “gao” is just “kao” with a voiced /k/.

して (shite): is the Te-form of “suru.”

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix. My understanding is that the Te-form plus “n” is equivalent to the present progressive conjugation. I’ll translate it as such.

だ (da): is the affirmative, present conjugation of the copula.

Translation: “Kagami is surprisingly making a cute sleeping face.”

かがみ:何だよ!何しに来たんだよ!帰れよ!
(Kagami: Nan da yo! Nani shi ni kitta-n da yo! Kare yo!)

何 (nani): is the interrogative pronoun meaning “what?” This pronoun changes pronunciation depending on what follows it. Remind me to write a post on this.

だ (da): is the same as always.

よ (yo): Is the emphatic ending particle. This is an expression. (Lots of expressions today.) It means “What!?” Literally it is “What is [it]!?

何 (nani): is the interrogative pronoun meaning “what?”

し (shi): is the verbal stem, or participle, of “suru.”

に (ni): is the dative particle indicating purpose. Every now and again one sees the verb “kuru” and “iku” using the participle and “ni” to express purpose for coming/going. That’s what’s going on here.

来た (kita): is the affirmative, past conjugation of “kuru,” meaning “to come.”

ん (n): is the same as always.

だ (da): is the same as always.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

帰れ (kaere): is an expression meaning “Get out!” It comes from the imperative, potential conjugation of “kaeru,” meaning “to return.”

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “What!? What did you come here for? Get out!”

こなた:起きた起きた。
(Konata: Okita Okita.)

起きた (okita): is the affirmative, past conjugation of “okiru,” meaning “to wake up,” among other things.

Translation: “She woke up. She woke up.”

かがみ:え? お見舞い? あんたが?私のためにわざわざ?
(Kagami: E? omimai? anta ga? Watashi no tame ni wazawaza?)

え (e): is the same as before. (See Part 19)

お見舞い (omimai): is the same as before.

あんた (anta): is a rough version of “anata,” which is a second person singular pronoun. This is an anime thing. Don’t call anybody “anta,” please.

が (ga): is our nominative particle.

私 (watashi): is the same as before. (See Part 20)

の (no): is the genitive particle.

ため (tame): is a noun meaning “benefit” or “advantage.”

に (ni): is the adverbial suffix.

わざわざ (wazawaza): is the same as before. To be clear, we’re talking about Konata coming over and how she went through the trouble for Kagami’s sake.

Translation: “What? A visit? You? Troubling yourself for me?”

こなた:そうだよ。
(Konata: Sou da yo.)

We’ve see everything here before. (See Part 20 for the “sou” explanation.)

Translation: “That’s right.”

かがみ:でーでも、うつしたらにくいしさ、気持ちだけ貰うわよ。
(Kagami: De-demo、utsushitara nikui shi sa, komichi dake morau wa yo. )

でも (demo): is a conjunction coming from the Te-form of “da” and the secondary particle “mo.” It means “but.”

うつしたら (utsushitara): it the conditional, affirmative conjugation of the verb “utsusu,” which means “to infect.”

にくい (nikui): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “horrible.”

し (shi) is a suffix used to express that the preceding phrase is part of a non-exhaustive list.

さ (sa): is another emphatic ending particle.

気持ち (kimochi): is a noun meaning “feeling” or “sentiment.”

だけ (dake): is a suffix meaning “only.”

貰う (morau): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to receive” or “to accept.”

わ (wa): is a feminine ending particle. It doesn’t mean much.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “But if [I] infect [you] it would be horrible [among other things]; I’ll accept only the sentiment.”

かがみ:ちぇ… 何よ? 嬉しいじゃない。新型のウィルスとか流行ってるから、心配してくれてるのか。いつもゲームやアニメの事しか考えてないと思ったけどちょっと感動しちゃったじゃない。
(Kagami: Chie… Nani yo? ureshii janai. Shingata no wirusu toka hayateru kara, shinpai shite kureteru-no ka. itsumo geemu ya anime no koto shika kangaetenai to omotta kedo chotto kanjou shichatta janai.)

ちぇ (chae): is an interjection meaning “darn.”

何 (nani): is the same as before.

よ (yo): is the same as before.

嬉しい (ureshii): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “happy” or “glad.”

じゃ (ja): is the same as before. (See Part 20)

ない (nai): is the same as before. (See Part 20) We should add, however, that this here is a truncation of “ja nai ka,” which is equivalent to “desu ne” or “da ne.” (Whichever you like)

新型 (shingata): is a noun meaning “a new form”

の (no): is the attributive form of the copula “da.” In Japanese grammar, you’ll hear of “no-adjectives” sometimes, which means that in some cases, “X no Y” means that X is an adjective, or that you should translate it as “X of Y.” I believe that at a syntactic level, there’s no need to call it an adjective; but you may want to translate it adjectivally or with an “of” (and “of Y” is a kind of adjectival interpretation), as I will do here, because otherwise it will sound weird.

ウィルス (wirusu): is the same as before. (See Part 19)

とか (toka): is a particle that means “among other things.”

流行ってる (hayatteru): is the truncated affirmative, present progressive conjugation of “hayaru,” meaning, in the case of illnesses “to be widespread.” The normal present progressive is “Vte + iru,” and here the /i/ is dropped out.

から (kara): is the post-position and conjunction that means “because.”

心配 (shinpai): is a noun meaning “worry” or “concern.”

して (shite): is the same as before.

くれてる (kureteru): is the truncated affirmative, present progressive conjugation of “kureru,” which we saw before. This is the same expression.

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

か (ka): is the interrogative suffix.

いつも (itsumo): is an adverb meaning “always.” “itsu” is an adverb meaning “what?” and “mo” is that secondary suffix.

ゲーム (geemu): is a loanword noun meaning “game.”

や (ya): is the same coordinating conjunction from before.

アニメ (anime): is a loanword noun meaning “animation,” and popularly refers to Japanese animation.

の (no): is the genitive particle.

事 (koto): is the same as always.

しか (shika): is a secondary particle (or at least I think so) meaning “nothing but.”

考えてない (kaetenai): is the truncated negative, present progressive conjugation of “kangaeru,” meaning “to think about.” The negative conjugation is “Vte + inai,” where the head of the verb phrase, “inai” is the negative conjugation of “iru,” the third copula.

と (to): is the quotative particle.

思った (omotta): is the affirmative past conjugation of “omou,” meaning to think.

けど (kedo): is the same as before. (See Part 19)

ちょっと (chotto): is an adverb meaning “a bit.”

感動 (kandou): is an noun meaning “emotional movement.”

しちゃった (shichatta): is the chau-form (as I call it) of “suru.” All this means is that the actual verb is “chau,” meaning “to finish completely” (often with a negative implication), and with it comes the participle, in this case “Shi.” So this means to be moved (kandou + suru (verbal stem) + chau (affirmative, past)).

じゃ (ja): is the same as before.

ない (nai): is the same as before.

Translation: “Darn What is this? I’m happy, aren’t I? Because the new form of the virus is being spread, she is worried about me? Though I thought that she only thought about games and anime things, I’m a bit moved, aren’t I?”

こなた:ほら、この前出た宿題とか見せて貰いたいし、あといい寝顔見せて貰ったし気にしなくていいって。

ほら (hora): is an interjection that intends to get people’s attention. It often translates to “look!”

この前 (kono-mae): is an adverb meaning “recently” or, more literally “This before,” meaning sometimes in the past, but not too long ago.

出た (deta): is the affirmative, past conjugation of the verb “deru,” meaning “to go out;” but in this context means “to be assigned.”

宿題 (shukudai): is a noun meaning “homework.”

とか (toka): is the same suffix as before.

見せて (misete): is the Te-form of “miseru,” meaning “to show.”

貰いたい (moraitai): is the desiderative form of “morau,” meaning “to receive” or “to accept.” Like “te kureru,” there is a “te morau,” meaning “to have something done for my benefit.”

し (shi): is the same suffix from the last sentence.e

あと (ato): in this case, is a conjunction, meaning “and.” It’s actually an adverb-sometimes-noun meaning “later,” but it seems that in some contexts it can be used as a conjunction.

いい (ii): is an adjective conjugated for the present, affirmative, meaning “good.”

寝顔 (negao): is the same as before.

見せて (misete): is the same as before.

貰った (moratta): is the affirmative, past conjugation of “morau.”

し (shi): is the safe suffix as before.

気 (ki): is the same as before. (See Part 20) This is a new expression.

に (ni): is the adverbial suffix.

しなくて (shinakute): is the Te-form of the negative conjugation of “suru.” “Ki ni suru” means “to care about” something; and when in the negative it means “to not mind.”

いい (ii): is the same as before. The expression “VnegTe + ii” means “it is good not Ving.” What this translates to is “don’t V.”

って (tte): is an emphatic ending particle, which I believe is just strengthening that “ii.”

Translation: “Look! I want you to show show me the homework we were recently assigned, and you also showed me that good sleeping face, so don’t mind it.” (Or “don’t worry about it.)

かがみ:かえれ!
(Kagami: Kaere!)

Translation: Get out!

Words Worth Memorizing

お母さん (okaasan): mother
いらっしゃい (irasshai): welcome
お姉さん/ちゃん (onee-san/chan): older sister
お見舞 (omimai): to check up on someone who is sick
来る (kuru): to come
くれる (kureru): to give; for someone do something for your benefit
あら (ara): Oh!
わざわざ (wazawaza): going through the trouble for something
ありがとう (arigatou): thank you
いえ (ie): No
お邪魔 (ojama): disturbance; hindrance
意外 (igai): surprising; special
かわいい (kawaii): cute
帰る (kaeru): to return
起きる (okiru): to wake up
あんた (anta): you (rough sounding)
ため (tame): benefit; advantage
うつす (utsusu): to be spreading (a disease)
にくい (nikui): horrible
気持ち (kimochi): feeling; sentiment
だけ (dake): only
貰う (morau): to receive; to have someone do something for your benefit
嬉しい (ureshii): happy
心配 (shinpai): worry; anxiety
いつも (itsumo): always
考える (kangaeru): to think about
思う (omou): to think
ちょっと (chotto): a bit
感動 (kandou): emotional movement
ほら (hora): look!
この前 (kono-mae): recently
出る (deru): to go out; to be assigned
宿題 (shukudai): homework
見せる (miseru): to show
気にする (ki ni suru): to care about; to mind

That’s it for today. My fingers literally ache. So it seems like there will be 36 parts. That’s a lot; and I thank you all for being with me throughout the process.

Again, I ask you that you give me a moment to revisit these once we’re done. When I say that I’m pretty solid on what I’ve said, then we’ll talk about what we disagree on. Thanks!