Lucky Star! Episode 1 (Part 24)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

We’re back. This still doesn’t conclude the conversation here. That happens in Part 25. As always, I do my best to cross reference things (From Part 22 to Part 25 today.) And we’ll take care of the booboos once we’re done with the episode. I’ll look it over again. I’ll say I looked it over; and then you can roast me as you see fit.

かがみ:やれやれだよ。
みゆき:それはもしかしたら泉さんなりの思いやりかもしれませんよ?宿題のことはおどけて見せてかがみさんを元気付けようとしたのかもしれませんし寝顔のことは騒がしくならないよう配慮した際の不可抗力かもしれませんし…
かがみ:こ-この女…聖人君子か!?私にはそんな発想できん…
みゆき:そういえば 今日はつかささんはいらっしゃらないんですか?
つかさ:お姉ちゃん体の具合良くなった?
かがみ:あのように病人よりもゆったりとした生活をしてるわ。
つかさ:あ-あのね、いつもはこうじゃ無いんだけど今日は春眠暁がどうのってやつで…あ、遅れたけどいらっしゃい。
みゆき:分かりますよ。私も最近なかなか起きられなくて…
つかさ:そ-そうだよね。最近眠いよね。
みゆき:そうですよねー 今日は特に暖かいですものね。

かがみ:やれやれだよ。
(Kagami: Yare-yeare da yo.)

やれやれ (yareyare): is a interjection expression one’s general disapproval but resignation to the given circumstances.

だ (da): is the copula. (We don’t need to translate the copula given that we don’t have any nouns.)

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “Oh well…”

みゆき:それはもしかしたら泉さんなりの思いやりかもしれませんよ?宿題のことはおどけて見せてかがみさんを元気付けようとしたのかもしれませんし寝顔のことは騒がしくならないよう配慮した際の不可抗力かもしれませんし…
(Miyuki: Sore wa moshikashitara Izumi-san nari no omoiyari kamoshiremasen yo? Shukudai no koto wa adokete misete Kagami-san wo genki tsuke-you to shita no kamoshiremasen shi negao no koto wa sawagashiku naranai-you hairyou shita sai no fukakouryoku kamoshiremasen shi…)

それ (sore): is the demonstrative noun meaning “that.”

は (wa): is our topical particle.

もしかしたら (moshikashitara): is an expression which comes from “moshika,” meaning “perhaps” and “shitara,” the conditional affirmative conjugation of “suru.” It means “perhaps.”

泉さん (Izumi-san): is the same as before. (See Part 23) But now you get to see the Kanji.

なりの (nari no): is also an expression. “Nari” is the participle of “naru,” meaning “to become,” and “no,” which is the substantivizing suffix. That “X nari no” means is “X’s own way/style of”

思いやり (omoyari): is a noun meaning “consideration” or “sympathy.”

かもしれません (kamoshiremasen): is an expression that comes from the verb “kamosu,” meaning “to cause.” “IP + kamoshiremasen/nai” means “perhaps IP.”

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

So far: “Perhaps that is maybe Konata’s own style of sympathy?”

宿題 (shukudai): is a noun meaning “homework.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

こと (koto): is a noun meaning “thing.”

は (wa): is our topical particle.

おどけて (odokete): is the Te-form, or gerund, of the verb “odokeru,” meaning “to joke.”

見せて (misete): is the Te-form of the verb “miseru,” meaning “to show.”

かがみさん (Kagami-san): is Kagami with the same suffix we saw before. (See Part 22)

を (wo): is our accusative particle.

元気付けよう (genki tsuke-you): is the noun “genki,” meaning “spirited” or “energetic,” and the verbal stem “tsuke,” from “tsukeru,” meaning “to stick” or “to add.” “Genki tsukeru” means “to cheer up.” “you” is a nominative suffix that makes the verb volitional, meaning it expresses intent.

と (to): is the quotative particle, working in an expression.

した (shita): is the affirmative, past conjugation of “suru,” V-you to shita” means “to try to V.”

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix we’ve seen a dozen times before.

かもしれません (kamoshiremasen): is the same as before.

し (shi): is a suffix that designates the phrase as part of a non-exhaustive list.

So far: “Perhaps the homework thing [was] her was trying to cheer you up with joking about seeing it, and”

寝顔 (negao): is a noun meaning “sleeping face.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

こと (koto): is the same as before.

は (wa): is our topical particle.

騒がしく (sawagashiku): is the adverbial form of the adjective “sawagashii,” meaning “noisy.”

ならないよう (naranai-you): is the negative, present conjugation of “naru,” and the nominative suffix “you,” which we saw before. “V[neg]+you” is “to will to not V,” which one translates to “to make sure not to V.”

配慮 (hairyo): is a noun meaning “consideration.”

した (shita): Is the same as before. This is one of those cases where we’re going to verbalize the preceding noun. So this will be “to be considerate.”

際 (sai): is a noun meaning “circumstance.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

不可抗力 (fukakouryoku): is a noun meaning “inevitabie.”

かもしれません (kamoshiremasen): is the same as before.

し (shi): is a suffix that designates the phrase as part of a non-exhaustive list.

Translation: “Perhaps that is maybe Konata’s own style of sympathy? Perhaps the homework thing [was] her trying to cheer you up [with] joking about seeing it, and the sleeping face thing was perhaps the inevitability of the circumstance that she was being considerate to make sure to not be noisy.” (In a professional translation you’d knock out some of these words, but I always feel it’s important to keep them in long sentences for our purposes.)

かがみ:こ-この女…聖人君子か!?私にはそんな発想できん…
(Kagami: Ko-kono onna… seijinkunshi ga!? Watashi ni wa sonna hassou dekin…)

この (kono): is an demonstrative adjective meaning “this.”

女 (onna): is a noun meaning “woman.”

聖人君子 (seijinkunshi): is a noun meaning “saint,” or, in more detail “holy person, wise person.”

か (ka): is the interrogative particle.

私 (watashi): is the first person singular pronoun, “I.”

には (ni wa): is a compoun particle. It’s the dative particle “ni,” indicating the indirect object, and “wa,” the topical particle. It often gets translated as “for.”

そんな (sonna): is an adjective meaning “such” or “like that.”

発想 (hassou): is a noun meaning “concept.” There is an omitted “wo” here.

できん (dekin): is the truncated form of the potential (irregular), negative, present conjugation of “suru.” Obviously it has a different lexical stem, but let’s roll with it. From “dekinai,” we have the /ai/ fall off, leaving us with “dekin,” that this means “to not be able to conceive.” (This interpretation will affect the translation, but there’s no way to make it sound natural otherwise.)

Translation: “Is this woman a saint? I cannot conceive it like that.”

みゆき:そういえば 今日はつかささんはいらっしゃらないんですか?
(Miyuki: Souieba kyou wa Tsukasa-san wa irrasharanai-n desu ka?)

そういえば  (souieba): is an expression meaning “if you say such a thing,” which is often translated as “now that you mention it,” or “come to think of it,” but it’s often just a topic changer. We all know “sou,” and we saw its “kou” counterpart (See Part 23). “Ieba” is the conditional conjugation of “iu,” meaning “to say.”

今日 (kyou): is a noun meaning “today.” This is another one of those nouns that acts adverbally.

は (wa): is our topical particle.

つかささん (Tsukasa-san): is Tsukasa.

は (wa): is another topical particle. Two topical particles is very rare, mind you.

いらっしゃらないん (irassharanai-n): is the verb “irasshararu,” an honorific verb meaning “to come” or “to go” or “to be,” counterpart to “kuru,” “iku” and “iru.” This verb is conjugated for the negative, present; and affixed to it is the substantivizing suffix. What the verb is referring to here is if Tsukasa “is here.”

です (desu): is the same as always

か (ka): is the interrogative particle.

Translation: “Come to think of it, is Tsukasa not here today?”

つかさ:お姉ちゃん体の具合良くなった?
(Tsukasa: O-nee-chan karada no guai yoku natta?)

So Tsukasa comes into the room, yawning, in her pajamas, and says this.

お姉ちゃん (O-nee-chan): is a noun meaning “older sister.” The “o” is the honorific preffix and “chan” is the intimate address suffix. The “nee” part is the honorific form of “older sister.” My understanding is that this isn’t something that’s super common. The normative thing is “o-nee-san.”

体 (karada): is the same as before. (See Part 23)

の (no): is the genitive particle.

具合 (guai): is a noun meaning “condition”

良く (yoku): is the adverbial form of the adjective “yoi,” meaning “good.” “Ii” and “yoi” mean the same thing and use the same Kanji. It’s just a matter of pronunciation.

なった (natta): is the affirmative, past conjugation of “naru,” meaning “to become.” This means “to become good,” which we’ll translate as “to improve.”

And then she realizes Miyuki is there; and embarrassed, she leaves.

Translation: “Sister, has the condition of your health improved?”

かがみ:あのように病人よりもゆったりとした生活をしてるわ。
(Kagami: Ano you ni byounin yori mo yattari to shita seikatsu wo shiteru wa.)

あの (ano): is an adjective meaning “that.” This is the /a/ lexeme of /ko/, /so/, and /a/.

よう (you): is the same as before. (See Part 23)

に (ni): is the adverbial suffix. What this phrase is referring to is the way Tsukasa seems to have just woken up and walked around in her pajamas.

病人 (byounin): is a noun meaning “sick person” or “patient.”

より (yori): is a post-position than in comparisons indicates teh lesser of the two in the quality described.

も (mo): is a secondary particle meaning “even” or “or.”

ゆったり (yuttari): is an adverb meaning “comfortably” or “relaxed.” It is an onomatopoetic adverb, and some of these take the “to” particle.

と (to): is our quotative particle, which we need.

した (shita): is the affirmative, past conjugation of “suru.”

生活 (seikatsu): is a noun meaning “lifestyle.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

してる (shiteru): is the truncated affirmative, present progressive conjugation of “suru.” “Seikatsu wo suru” can be translated as “to live”

わ (wa): is the effeminate ending particle.

Translation: “Like that, she lives a lifestyle that’s more relaxed than even a sick person.”

つかさ:あ-あのね、いつもはこうじゃ無いんだけど今日は春眠暁がどうのってやつで…あ、遅れたけどいらっしゃい。
(Tsukasa: A-ano ne, itsumo wa kou ja nai-n dakedo kyou wa shunmin akatsuki ga dou-no tte yatsu de… a, okureta kedo irassai.)

あの (ano): here is an interjection, translating to “Um…”

ね (ne): is the softening ending particle.

いつも (itsumo): is an adverb meaning “always.”

は (wa): is the topic particle.

こう (kou): is the same as before. (See Part 23)

じゃ (ja): is the contracted form of “de wa,” which is equivalent to “wa.”

無い (nai): is the negative, present conjugation of the copula “aru.” Now you get to see its Kanji.

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix. I just wanted to separate it from teh rest of this to highlight “nai,” which is an important adverb.

だ (da): is the same as always.

けど (dake): is a conjunction meaning “though.” “X kedo Y” means “Though X, Y”

今日 (kyou): is the same as before.

は (wa): is our topical particle.

春眠暁 (shunmin akatsuki): is a reference to an Eastern idiom that means something like “In spring one sleeps and does not remember the daw.”

が (ga): the nominative particle.

どうの (dou-no): (This is my theory) The “dou” is the interrogative counterpart to “kou” and this is going to be a kind of indirect question. The “no” is the substantivizing suffix.

って (tte) is the casual quoting particle. I will hold that this is indicated the way the “yatsu” is.

やつ (yatsu): is a colloquial term for “thing.”

で (de): is the Te-form of the copula “da.” Here she gave herself allowance to continue adding ideas to the sentence, but something else came up.

あ (a): is the same as before.

遅れた: (okoreta): is the affirmative, past of the verb “okoreru,” meaning “to be late.”

けど (kedo): is the same as before.

いらっしゃい (irasshai): is an expression meaning “welcome,” which comes from the verb “irassharu.”

Translation: Um…  Though I am not always like this, today it’s a thing like what? “The day of the sleep in spring?” Oh! And though this was late, welcome!”

みゆき:分かりますよ。私も最近なかなか起きられなくて…
(Miyuki: Wakarimasu yo. Watashi mo saikin nakanaka okirarenakute…)

分かります (wakarimasu): is the polite, affirmative, present conjugation of “wakaru,” meaning “to understand.”

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

私 (watashi): is the same as before.

も (mo): is the secondary particle. Here “wa” is omitted.

最近 (saikin): is an adverb meaning “recently.”

なかなか (nakanaka): is an adverb that is part of an expression. It by itself means “considerably.” When working with a verb conjugated for negative polarity it means that the verb is done with difficulty.

起きられなくて (okirarenakute): is the Te-form of the passive, negative conjugation of “okiru,” meaning “to wake up.” The passive here is being used to express suffering, it’s one of the uses of the passive, or discomfort at doing something. So the meaning isn’t really passive, it’s just conveying that annoyance.

Translation: “I understand. I too recently have trouble waking up.”

つかさ:そ-そうだよね。最近眠いよね。
(Tsukasa: So-sou da yo ne. Saikin nemui yo ne.)

そう (sou): is the same as always.

だ (da): is the same as always.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

ね (ne): is the softening/dubitative ending particle. This is another way of saying “Sou desu ne.”

最近 (saikin): is the same as before.

眠い (nemui): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “sleepy.”

よ (yo): is the same as before.

ね (ne): is the same as before.

Translation: “That’s right! Recently I’ve been sleepy.”

みゆき:そうですよねー 今日は特に暖かいですものね。
(MIyuki: Sou desu yo nee Kyou wa toku ni atatakai desu mono ne.)

そう (sou): is the same as always.

です (desu): is the same as always.

よ (yo): is the same as always.

ね (ne): is the same as always.

今日 (kyou): is the same as before.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

特に (toku-ni): is the noun “toku,” meaning “special,” and the adverbial suffix “ni.” Thus this means “especially.”

暖かい (atatakai): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “warm.”

です (desu): is the same as always.

もの (mono): is a noun meaning “think.”

ね (ne): is the same as always.

Translation: “That’s right. The thing is that today it’s especially warm, right?”

Words Worth Memorizing
やれやれ (yareyare): an interjection expressing resignation and disapproval.
もしかしたら (moshikashitara): maybe; perhaps
思いやり (omoiyari): consideration; sympathy
かもしれません (kamoshiremasen): perhaps
宿題 (shukudai): homework
おどける (odokeru): to joke
見せる (miseru): to show
元気 (genki): spirited, energetic
元気付く (genki tsuku): to cheer up
よう (you): form; like…
寝顔 (negao): sleeping face
騒がしい (sawagashii): noisy
配慮 (hairyo): concern
際 (sai): circumstance
不可抗力 (fukakouryoku): inevitability
女 (onna): woman
聖人君子 (seijinkunshi): saint
私 (watashi): I
発想 (hassou): conception
できる (dekiru): able to do (potential form of “suru.”)
今日 (kyou): today
いらっしゃる (irassharu): to come; to go; to be (honorific verb)
お姉ちゃん (o-nee-chan): older sister
具合 (guai): condition
良く (yoku): well
病人 (byounin): sick person; patient
より (yori): than (comparative) (post-position)
ゆったり (yuttari): relaxed
生活 (seikatsu): lifestyle
いつも (itsumo): always
こう (kou): this way
無い (nai): negative of “aru.”
けど (kedo): though (conjunction)
春眠暁を覚えず (shunmin akatsuki wo oboezu): “In spring one sleeps a sleep one does not know the dawn.”
やつ (yatsu): thing
遅れる (okoreru): to be late
分かる (wakaru): to understand
最近 (saikin): recently
起きる (okiru): to wake up
眠い (nemui): sleepy
特 (toku): special
暖かい (atatakai): warm
なかなか (nakanaka): quite; (with neg. verb) to do with much difficulty