Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 14)

We are back with our runthrough. Please check out Part 13 is you haven’t done so already, because we’re covering Parts 13, 14, and 15 sequentially, meaning that we’re not stopping to re-explain things. The explanations will therefore be in previous sections.

 

(cont’d) Scene 11 Street—Night — Edward, Alphonse, Brosh

アルフォンス: 地下への入り口は?

エドワード: なかった。

エドワード: だが、錬金術で塞いだ跡はあった。

エドワード: さすがに入り口を残しとくほどバカじゃねぇや。

アルフォンス: そっか。

アルフォンス: ここからホムンクルスに会いに行くのは無理みたいだね。  

エドワード: ヤツら、オレのことを貴重な人柱だから死なれちゃ困るって言ってた。    

アルフォンス: 僕も言われた。

アルフォンス: 扉を開けたから人柱になれるって。

エドワード: 人柱ってのは多分扉を開けて帰って来られる力量を持った術師のことだ。

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アルフォンス: 地下への入り口は?
(Arufonsu: Chika e no iriguchi wa?)

地下 (chika): is a noun meaning “basement.”

へ (e): is the locative particle. The locative case indicates a direction. It often gets translated as “to.”

の (no): is the genitive particle. We’re thinking that “e no” is a truncation of something longer, but we’re not sure what. We might have to go to the dictionary for this one.

入り口 (iriguchi): is a noun meaning “entrance.” the “Entrance of to the basement” is the “entrance to the basement.”

は (wa): is the topical particle.

Translation: “Alphonse: The entrance to the basement?”

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エドワード: なかった。
(Edowaado: Nakatta.)

なかった (nakatta): is the indicative, past, negative conjugation of the copula “aru.” This is one of the cases where the copula is going to be translated in the vein of “to have.”

Translation: “Edward: [It] did not have [one].” is fine for our purposes, but keep in mind that “aru” means that something is present, and so if it’s negative it means that it isn’t there, or it wasn’t there. So one can also say: “[It] was not [there].”

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エドワード: だが、錬金術で塞いだ跡はあった。
(Edowaado: Da ga, renkinjitsu de fusaida ato wa atta.)

だ (da): is the copula. This is part of an expression. What “da” is doing here is recapitulating what was said, something like “it is so…”

が (ga): is the conjunction from before. “da ga” as an expression can be translated to “but.”

錬金術 (renkinjitsu): is a noun we’ve seen before, meaning “alchemy.”

で (de): is the instrumental particle. The instrumental case marks the means or the cause of something to happen. One can translate this as “with” quite often.

塞いだ (fusaida): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of “ fusugu,” meaning “to close up.” Edward saw that where the entrance was the night before, there now stood an artificial wall, you see.

跡 (ato): is a noun meaning “signs” or “indications.”

は (wa): is the topical particle.

あった (atta): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the copula “aru.”

Translation: “Edward: But, there were indications that [someone] blocked up [the entrance] with alchemy.”

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エドワード: さすがに入り口を残しとくほどバカじゃねぇや。
(Edowaado: Sasuga-ni iriguchi wo nokoshit’oku hodo baka ja nee ya.)

さすがに (sasuga-ni): is the noun “sasuga,” meaning “as one would expect” plus the adverbial suffix “ni.”

入り口 (iriguchi): is the same noun as before.

を (wo): is the accusative particle. The accusative case marks the direct object of the verb. Its other functions are quite rare.

残しとく (nokotshit’oku): is a contraction of “nokoshite oku,” which is, in turn, the gerund of the verb “nokosu,” meaning “to leave behind,” and “oku,” a verb meaning many things, but here, “to prepare.” “X(gerund) oku” can mean, roughly, “to prepare (or to do a job) by X-ing.” All we mean to say is that in the their job of hiding their tracks, they (the homunculi) went and left the entrance open. A less odd way of translating this is often to say “to go ahead and X,” which preserves a lot of nuances.

ほど (hodo): is a noun/adverb meaning “extent” “X hodo Y” means “Y to the extend that X.” (It’s really a noun, but gets used adverbially.)

バカ (baka): is a noun meaning “stupid.” It is one of these “na-adjectives” you sometimes hear about.

じゃ (ja): is a contraction of the compound particle “de wa,” which is equivalent to “wa.”

ねぇ (nee): is a casual form of saying “nai,” which is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of “aru.”

や (ya): is a casual form of “yo.”

Translation: “Edward: As one would expect, they are not so stupid as to go ahead and leave it [as is.]”

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アルフォンス: そっか。
(Arufonsu: Sokka.)

そっか (sokka): is a contraction of “Sou ka,” which is an expression we’ve already seen.

Translation: “Is that so?”

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アルフォンス: ここからホムンクルスに会いに行くのは無理みたいだね。
(Arufonsu: Koko kara homunkurusu ni ai ni iku no wa muri mitai da ne.)

ここ (koko): is noun meaning “here.” This is the directional /k/ we’ve seen before.

から (kara): is the same post-position we saw before, meaning “from.” This “koko kara” is a kind of metaphorical use, not meaning literally from where they’re standing, but from the information they have.

ホムンクルス (homunkurusu): is a noun meaning “homunculus,” which are the villains in this show. This is also plural, so we will see it as “homunculi.”

に (ni): is the dative particle. The following verb’s object takes the dative.

会い (ai): is the stem, or participle, of the verb “au,” meaning “to meet with.”

に (ni): is also the dative particle. Here it is marking the purpose of the following verb.

行く (iku): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to go.”

の (no): is the same substantivizing particle as before.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

無理 (muri): is a noun meaning “impossible.”

みたい (mitai): is a suffix meaning “seeming(ly).”

だ (da): is the copula.

ね (ne): is the dubitative ending particle. It expresses doubt or a desire for confirmation from the addressee.

Translation: “Alphonse: From here it seems impossible that we will go to meet with the humunculi, huh?”

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エドワード: ヤツら、オレのことを貴重な人柱だから死なれちゃ困るって言ってた。
(Edowaado: Yatsu-ra, ore no koto wo kichou-na hitobashira da kara shinarecha komaru tte itte’ta)

ヤツら (yatsu-ra): is the casual pronoun “yatsu,” meaning “that guy,” which the pluralizing suffix -ra, making it “those guys.” Note that we do not have a particle here. It would be “wa.”

オレ (ore): is a casual first-person singular pronoun. “I.”

の (no): is the attributive form of the copula “da.” Don’t worry too much about this. Just know that it isn’t the genitive particle.

こと (koto): is a noun meaning “thing.” When it comes to people “X no koto” is an expression that serves to emphasize X. So one can say “X itself.” So it doesn’t get translated as “the thing being X,” though that’d be literal.

を (wo): is, to our understanding, a misuse of “wo,” or at least a casual use of “wo.” What this should be is “ga.” We’ll research this and get back to you on this.

貴重な  (kichou-na): is a noun meaning “precious,” with the adjectival verbal suffix -na. It is adjectival because it is used to mark a noun modifying another, but it is verbal because it functions in an attributive verbal phrase (it’s a pseudo-copula, you see.)

人柱 (hitobashira): is a noun meaning “human sacrifice.”

だ (da): is the copula.

から (kara): is a conjunction, meaning “because.”

死なれちゃ (shinarecha): is a contraction of “shirarete wa.” The use of the gerund and the topical particle serves as a conditional expression. “shinarete” comes from “shinareru,” which is the passive of “shinu,” meaning “to die.” This use of the passive is known as “the suffering passive,” which means that the action is not passive itself, but its happening is an inconvenience to someone.

困る (komaru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to get in trouble.”

って (tte): is the casual quotative particle.

言ってた (itte’ta): is the contracted form of the periphrastic progressive, indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of “iu,” meaning “to say.” Periphrastic means that it is a conjunction created by more than one verb (”te oku” and “te chau” can also be considered periphrastic. What this perophrastic construction grants us is that it gives the verbs progressive aspect. Progressive aspect is to say that the action of the verb took place across a certain amount of time, not just at one time. In English, progressive aspect is expressed as “to be Xing”

Translation: “Edward: Those guys, they were saying that because I myself am their precious human sacrificed, if I died, they would get into trouble.” 

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アルフォンス: 僕も言われた。
(Arufonsu: Boku mo owareta.)

僕 (boku): is a masculine first-person singular pronoun: “I.”

も (mo): is a secondary particle. A secondary particle is a particle that acts in conjunction with another but adds some more information. “mo” adds the sense of “too” or “even,” as in “I, too, ate a cookie.” or “Even my brother can do that.” In this case, it is the former: “too.” When paired with “wa,” “wo,” and “ga,” those particles drop out and you’re just left with “mo.” In this case, it was “wa” that was dropped out.

言われた (iwareta): is the indicative, passive, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “iu.”

Translation: “Alphonse: I, too, was told that.”

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アルフォンス: 扉を開けたから人柱になれるって。
(Arufonsu: Tobira wo aketa kara hitobashira ni nareru tte.)

扉 (tobira): is a noun meaning “door.” In this show, there is a “door of truth” that alchemists can sometimes open at the cost of their body organs. That’s what he’s talking about.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

開けた (aketa): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “akeru,” meaning “to open.”

から (kara): is the same conjunction as before, meaning “because.”

人柱 (hitobashira): is the same noun as before.

に (ni): is the dative particle. The following verb takes the dative.

なれる (nareru): is the potential, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “naru,” meaning “to become.” The potential mood describes the possibility of an action occurring.

って (tte): is the casual quotative particle. It shows up in many places, and whether or not it is a multi-functional particle, we don’t know yet. So we do not want to say that this is a quote and that the verb “omou,” “to think,” has been dropped out, but it is a possibility.

Translation: “Alphonse: {Possibly: I think that} Because I opened the door, I can be a human sacrifice.”

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エドワード: 人柱ってのは多分扉を開けて帰って来られる力量を持った術師のことだ。
(Edowaado: hitobashira tte no wa tabun tobira wo akete kaettekorareru rikiryou wo motta jitsushi no koto da.”

人柱 (hitobashira): is the same noun as before.

って (tte): is the casual quoting particle.

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

多分 (tabun): is an adverb meaning “probably” or “perhaps.”

扉 (tobira): is the same noun as before.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

開けて (akete): is the gerund of the verb “akeru,” which we’ve seen before.

帰って来られる (kaettekorareru): is the potential, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of “kaettekuru,” meaning “to come back.” You’ll note, of course, that this is actually two verb “kaette,” gerund of “kaeru,” meaning “to return,” and “kuru,” meaning “to come.”

力量 (rikiryou): is a noun meaning “ ability” or “capacity”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

持った (motta): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “motsu,” meaning “to possess.”

術師 (jitsushi): is a noun meaning “technique user,” but one can see it as an abbreviation of “renkinjitsu-shi,” just keeping the last two parts.

のこと (no koto): is the same expression as before.

だ (da): is the copula.

Translation: “Edward: The ‘human sacrifices,’ they are probably the alchemists themselves that possessed the power that opens the door and can come back.” (Note: If you want to say “power to open the door…” instead, that is fine and generally more appropriate.)

 

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