Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 17)

(cont’d) Scene 12 — Hotel — Night — Edward, Alphonse

エドワード:もうあいつの泣きっ面なんざ見たくねぇ。

アルフォンス:僕もだよ。

エドワード:スカーとはもう一度対峙しなきゃならねぇな。      

アルフォンス:真相を確かめるの?

エドワード:それもあるけどもう一つ ー ホムンクルスをおびき出す。

エドワード:ヤツらはオレに死なれちゃ困るんだ。      

エドワード:だからオレがスカーに襲われて危機に陥ったら-

アルフォンス:出てくる?

アルフォンス:確立は低いと思うけど。  

エドワード:何もやらないよりマシだ。

アルフォンス:けど僕ら、この前スカーには一瞬でやられたんだよ。

エドワード:多分オレたち前より強くなって…

アルフォンス:仮にホムンクルスが出てきたとしてもどうやって捕まえるのさ?

アルフォンス:強いうえにほとんど不死身なんだ。

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エドワード:もうあいつの泣きっ面なんざ見たくねぇ。
(Edowaado: Mou aitsu no nakittsura-nanza mitakunee.)

もう (mou): is an adverb meaning “again.”

あいつ (aitsu): a pronoun meaning “that person,” in this case, it is referring to Winry.

の (no): is the genitive particle.

泣きっ面 (nakittsura): is a noun meaning “crying face.”

なんざ (nanza): is probably just a variation on “-nanka,” which is a derogatory suffix. This suffix can be translated as “damn” or “stupid.” Note that we do not have a case particle here. It would be “wo.”

見たくねぇ (mitakunee): is a casual way of saying “mitakunai,” which is the desiderative, imperfective, negative conjugation of the verb “miru,” meaning “to see.” The desiderative mood expresses a desire to do something. In the negative, it expresses a desire to not do something. The desiderative suffix is -tai, with that /i/ being the same pseudo-copula that is found on adjectival verbs. In the negative, -i is -kunai. And clearly that /ai/ got turned into /ee/.

Translation: “Edward: I don’t want to see her damn crying face again.”

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アルフォンス:僕もだよ。
(Arufonsu: Boku mo da yo.)

僕 (boku): is a masculine first-person, singular pronoun, “I.”

も (mo): is the secondary particle. “ga” has dropped out because of it.

だ (da): is the copula. Note that this particle is kind of standing in for the real verb, which is “mitakunai.”

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “Alphonse: Me, neither.” or “I, too, [do not want to see her crying face.]”

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エドワード:スカーとはもう一度対峙しなきゃならねぇな。
(Edowaado: Sukaa to wa mou ichido taiji shinakya nara nee na.)

スカー (Sukaa): is Scar, the antagonist.

とは (to wa): is a compound particle. The “to” is a conjunction, here translating to “with.” And “wa” is the topical particle.

もう (mou): is the same adverb as before.

一度 (ichido): is the number “ichi,” meaning “one,” which the suffix “do,” meaning “-times.” So this is “one time again,” or “one more time.”

対峙 (taiji): is a noun meaning “confrontation.” It pairs with the next word, which we’ll tell you is a form of “suru,” to mean “to have a confrontation” (which is a good translation if we want to preserve the conjunction “to”) or “to confront” (in which case “Scar” will be made the direct object.)

しなきゃ (shinakya): is a casual way of saying “shinakereba,” which is the negative -eba conditional conjunction of “suru.” So we have “suru” – “shinai” – “shinak-” “shinakereba.”

ならねぇ (naranee): is a casual form of saying “naranai,” so it follows the same pattern as “mitakunee.” “Naranai” is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of “naru,” meaning “to become” or “to complete” So what we’re saying is that “if we do not fight [him], [it] will not complete,” which is an expression: “Xnarkereba naranai” is a form of expression that something must be done.

な (na)- is the casual dubitative ending particle.

Translation: “Edward: We must confront Scar one more time, huh?

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アルフォンス:真相を確かめるの?
(Arufonsu: Shinzou wo tashikameru no?) 

真相 (shinzou): is a noun meaning “the truth.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

確かめる (tashikameru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to confirm.”

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix. This suffix and its counterpart “n” will sometimes be used to mark “the point.” In English people often say “The thing’s that…” when one wants to give an explanation for something. This is what this is doing.

Translation: “Alphonse: [The thing’s that] [we] will confirm the truth?

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エドワード:それもあるけどもう一つ ー ホムンクルスをおびき出す。
(Edowaado: Sore mo aru kedo mou hitotsu – homunkurusu wo obikidasu.)

それ (sore): is the pronoun, meaning “that.”

も (mo): is the secondary particle.

ある (aru): is the copula.

けど (kedo): is a conjunction meaning “though.”

もう (mou): is the same adverb as before. “Mou” has a number of translations in English because its definition does not match “again” perfectly. Here we can say “yet another”

一つ  (hitotsu): is a general counter for “one,” as in “one of anything.” In this case, it’s referring to a reason or a “no,” a point to doing this. So we will translation this as “reason.”

ホムンクルス (homunkurusu): is a noun meaning “homunculus.” We can’t remember if we explained this before, the “homunculi” are the main antagonists of this show.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

おびき出す (obikidasu): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to lure out.”

Translation: “Edward: “Though [there] is that, too, [there is] yet another one [reason]- we will lure out the Homunculi.”

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エドワード:ヤツらはオレに死なれちゃ困るんだ。
(Edowaado: Yatsu-ra wa ore ni shinarecha komaru-n da.)

ヤツら (yatsu-ra): is the third-person pronoun “yatsu,” meaning “him/her/that guy” and the plural suffix -ra, making it “those guys/they/them.”

は (wa): is the topical particle.

オレ (ore): is a masculine, first-person pronoun. It is normally singular, but here it is plural, to refer to both Edward and Alphonse.

に (ni): is the dative particle. The following verb, being passive, takes the agent in the dative. It won’t be translatable as such, for reasons we will see, but that’s what’s going on.

死なれちゃ (shinarecha): is a contraction of “shinarete wa,” which is an expression that can translate as a conditional. It is the gerund of the passive conjugation of “shinu,” meaning to die, and the topical particle. The use of the passive voice is a special one: to indicate that the action would be unfortunate. This is called the “suffering passive.”

困る (komaru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to get in trouble.”

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix. Note that this one, too, is pointing something out.

だ (da): is the copula.

Translation: “Edward: Those guys, [it] is [the case that] if we due, they will get into trouble.” 

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エドワード:だからオレがスカーに襲われて危機に陥ったら-
(Edowaado: Da kara ore ga Sukaa ni oswarete kiki ni ochiittara-)

だ (da): is the copula.

から (kara): is the conjunction, meaning “because.” “da kara” is a conjunctival expression, meaning “thus.” It comes from “da” serving as a placeholder for all that was said before, and connective it to “kara.” So it is saying “because [everything just said.]”

オレ (ore): is the same as before.

が (ga): is the nominative particle

スカー (Sukaa): is Scar.

に (ni): is the dative particle.

襲われて (osowarete): is the passive gerund of the verb “osou,” meaning “to attack.” In the passive voice, this means “to be attacked.” The gerund is conjunctival here, meaning we will be linking this verb phrase to the next one.

危機 (kiki): is a noun meaning “danger.”

に (ni): is the dative particle.

陥ったら (ochiittara)- is the -ra conditional conjugation of the verb “ochiiru,” meaning “to fall into.” Japanese has many conditionals, this is one of the more common ones. It kind of takes first part of the conditional as a given, which is why it is sometimes translated as “when” and it calls attention to the second part.

Translation: “Edward: Thus, when we are attacked by scar and fall into danger-”

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アルフォンス:出てくる?
(Arufonsu: Detekuru?)

出てくる (detekuru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to come out.”

Translation: “Alphonse: [They] will come out?

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アルフォンス:確立は低いと思うけど。
(Arufonsu: Kakuritsu wa hikui to omou kedo.)

確立 (kakuritsu): is a noun meaning “chances” or “likeliness” or “certainty.”

は (wa): is the topical particle.

低い (hikui): is the imperfective conjugation of the adjectival verb meaning “low.” What he is saying is that the chances of it playing out like that are low.

と (to): is the quotative particle.

思う (omou): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the meaning “to think.”

けど (kedo): is the same conjunction as before.

Translation: “Alphonse: Though I think the likeliness is low.” 

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エドワード:何もやらないよりマシだ。
(Edowaado: Nani-mo yaranai yori maji da.)

何も (nani-mo): is a pronoun meaning “nothing.” It is made up of “nani,” which is the interrogative pronoun “what?” and the restrictive suffix “-mo,” which we don’t believe is the same as the secondary suffix.

やらない (yaranai): is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of the verb “yaru,” meaning “to do.” Japanese does double negatives, so “to not do nothing” is to not do anything.

より (yori): is a suffix that has an ablative-like function, which means that it expresses movement out of, and in comparatives it will mark the lesser of the two.

マシ (maji): is a noun meaning “better.”

だ (da): is the copula.

Translation: “Edward: [It] is better than not doing anything.”

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アルフォンス:けど僕ら、この前スカーには一瞬でやられたんだよ。
(Arufonsu: Kedo boku-ra, kon-mae Sukaa ni wa isshun de yarareta-n da yo.)

けど (kedo): is the conjunction.

僕ら (boku-ra): is the pronoun with the pluralizing suffix.

この前 (kono-mae): is a noun meaning “not long ago.” “Mae” is a noun meaning “before.” “Kono” is the adjective (it’s not really an adjective, but we will leave it be.) meaning “this,” so it means “this before.” Think of it as a timeline, and the “kono” being the part of the past being closest to the present.”

スカー (Sukaa): is Scar.

には (ni wa): is a compound particle. It’s made with the dative particle “ni” and the topical particle “wa.”

一瞬 (isshun): is a noun meaning “instant” or “quick moment.”

で (de): is a post-position. There is a “de” that’s a case particle, and a “de” that is a post-position. It is strange, but that is how it works. The post-position tends to mark locations and, sometimes, times. (We can’t recall any of those instances of it marking times it being a numerically expressed time, like an hour or minute. It’s vague stuff like “isshun.”)

やられた (yarareta)- is the passive, indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “yaru,” which is the same verb we saw before, but here meaning “to beat up” or “to beat.” So in the passive this means “to be beaten (up)”

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix.

だ (da): is the copula.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “Alphonse: Though not long ago [it] is [the case that] we were beaten in an instant by Scar.”

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エドワード:多分オレたち前より強くなって…
(Edowaado: Tabun ore-tachi mae yori tsuyoku-natte…)

多分 (tabun): is an adverb meaning “perhaps.”

オレたち (ore-tachi): is the pronoun from before with the pluralizing suffix -tachi (there are two main pluralizing suffixes, this is the other.) So this means “us.”

前 (mae): is the same noun as before, meaning “before.” We should have mentioned before that this is one of those nouns that behaves adverbially in the sense that it does not take case particles.

より (yori): is the same suffix as before.

強くなって (tsuyoku-natte): is the adverbial form of the adjectival verb “tsuyoi,” meaning “strong,” and the gerund of the verb “naru,” which we saw a moment ago. This is how one expresses “to become X,” when X is an adjectival verb. The gerund’s function is never revealed because he Alphonse gets cut off, but we can suspect that it’s means somewhat conditionally, so state that they might stand a chance now of lasting longer.

Translation: “Edward: Perhaps [if] we [have] become stronger than before.” (We stuck the “have” in there because it’s worth assuming that Edward plans on finding Scar now and not leaving to go train.)

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アルフォンス:仮にホムンクルスが出てきたとしてもどうやって捕まえるのさ?
(Arufonsu: Kari ni homunkurusu ga ketekita to shite mo dou yatte tsukamaeru no sa?)  

仮に (kari ni): is an adverb made up of “kari,” a noun meaning “provincially” and the adverbial suffix “-ni.” This often gets translated as “For argument’s sake,” as in “X in a provincial manner”

ホムンクルス (homunkurusu): are the Homunculi.

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

出てきた (detekita): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “detekuru,” which we saw a moment ago.

としても (to shite mo): is an expression, but it is made up of parts we know. “to” is the quotative particle. “shite” is the gerund of “suru.” And “mo” is the secondary particle. As a whole, it means something like “even [it] happened that X,” which we translate as a conditional, “even if…”

どう (dou): is the interrogative adverb, “how?”

やって (yatte): is the gerund of “yaru,” which here goes back to meaning “to do.” The gerund is being used conjunctively. We should also note that “dou yatte” is said very often and is essentially equivalent to just “dou.”

捕まえる (tsukamaeru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to capture.” Note we have no object here, but it is implied that it is the Homunculi themselves.

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

さ (sa): is a filler interjection. It is similar to English’s “like,” but it adds a bit more assertion than “like.”

Translation: “Alphonse: For argument’s sake, even if the Homunculi come out, how [is it the case that] will we capture [them?]

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アルフォンス:強いうえにほとんど不死身なんだ。
(Arufonsu: Tsuyoi ue ni hotondo fujimi-na n da.”

強い (tsuyoi): is the imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the adjectival verb “tsuyoi,” which we saw a moment ago.

うえに (ue ni): is the noun “ue,” meaning “above” and the adverbial suffix “-ni.” This is an expression meaning “on top of” or “in addition to.”

ほとんど (hotondo): is an adverb meaning “practically” or “virtually.”

不死身 (fujimi): is a noun meaning “immortality.”

な (na): is a pseudo-copula used by certain nouns that are primarily used adjectivally, or, that they express “a quality” of something else. “Fujimi” is like this, so here it will mean “immortal.” When these nouns come before nouns (and “no” and “n” are purely functional dependent nouns), they take this pseudo-copula, which has only one conjugation: imperfective, affirmative.

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix.

だ (da): is the copula.

Translation: “Alphonse: On top of being strong, [it] is [the case that] [they] are practically immortal.”

 

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