Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 21)

For Part 21, we’ll be doing two scenes and 7 lines. This one is a bit shorter than usual, but that’s okay. Please check out Part 20 if you’d like to learn about everything we skim over. Parts 20 through 24 are coming out on the same weekend, you see.

Scene 15 — Nameless Village, Doctor Marcoh’s House — Breda

ブレダ:ドクター ドクター。

ブレダ: いらっしゃらないのですか。

ブレダ:くっそ。

Scene 16 — Central Hospital, Hallway — Roy, Riza, Havoc’s Mother, Officer

ロイ:そうか。 

ロイ:ご苦労だった。

ロイ:手詰まりか。      

士官: では、失礼します。

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ブレダ:ドクター ドクター。
(Bureda: Dokutaa Dokutaa.)

ドクター (Dokutaa): is a noun meaning “doctor.” It’s a loanword, and the character Breda is calling for, Doctor Marcoh, is called “Dokutaa Marukoh.” This is something irregular. Doctors in Japanese are generally addressed as “-sensei.”

Translation: “Breda: Doctor, Doctor.”

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ブレダ: いらっしゃらないのですか。
(Bureda: Irassharanai no desu ka.)

いらっしゃらない (irassharanai): is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of the verb “irassharu,” which is a verb used as an honorific counterpart of the copula “iru” (as well as “iku” and “kuru”). Here “iru” means “to be present” or “to be around”

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

です (desu): is the polite variation of “da.”

か (ka): is the interrogative particle.

Please keep in mind that we’re not aiming for literary and commercially apt translations. Instead, we are aiming for translation that mirror the syntax and semantics of the original text, even if it will not be idiomatic.

Translation: “Breda: Is it the case that you are not [present]?”

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ブレダ:くっそ。
(Bureda: Kusso.)

Breda walks into the apartment and finds it ransacked.

くっそ (kusso): is a noun meaning “shit.” And it is used as an interjection as well, as in English.

Translation: “Breda: Shit.”

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ロイ:そうか。
(Roi: Sou ka.)

This is an expression we saw in Part 20.

Translation: “Roy: I see.”

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ロイ:ご苦労だった。
(Roi: Go-kurou datta.)

ご苦労 (go-kurou): is a noun meaning “trouble,” as in the trouble one goes through to get the job done. This is part of an expression, which in real life tends to be “Go-kurou-sama deshita,” used when one’s co-workers are leaving the workplace to express that they have worked hard, and that you are thankful for their work.

だった (datta): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of “da.”

Translation: “Roy: “It has been trouble.” or “Roy: Thank your for your work.”

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ロイ:手詰まりか。
(Roi: Tedzumari ka.)

手詰まり (tedzumari): is a noun meaning “deadlock” or “dead end.” What Roy is referring to here is that their lead to curing Havoc is gone and it’s unclear what they’ll do.

か (ka): is interrogative ending particle. You can take this rhetorically, if you wish.

Translation: “Roi: Is [this] a dead end?”

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士官: では、失礼します。
(Shikan: De wa, shitsurei shimasu.)

では (de wa): is an conjunctival expression, made up of the gerund of the copula “da” and the topical particle “wa.” The topical particle marks the topic of the sentence, not the subject, but sometimes the topic is (on a contextual level) also the subject, which is why in translation it gets translated as such. In English, sentences always need subjects. “De wa” translates to “Thus” or “well then” “on that note,” because the “de” is encapsulating everything previous discussed and making that the topic.

失礼 (shitsurei): is a noun meaning “discourtesy.” This is an expression, being somewhat equivalent to “excuse me” or “thank you (for something I’ve had you do.)

します (shimasu): is the polite, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of “suru.” So the expression means “I will do a discourtesy” or “I will do something discourteous.”

Translation: “Officer: Well then, excuse me.” or “Officer: On [what was discussed] being [so], I will do a discourtesy.”

 

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