Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 22)

Scene 17 — Central Hospital, Havoc’s Room — Roy, Riza, Havoc

ロイ:今のは?

ハボック:オレの親と退役軍人局の人っすよ。      

ハボック:退役の手続きを取りました。

ロイ:まだ治らんと決まったわけでは-  

ハボック:自分がもう使えないって分からないほど バカじゃないっす。

ロイ:だが-

ハボック:動けない駒はいらんでしょう?

ハボック:なんて目してんだよ?

ハボック:置いていけよ。 

ハボック:捨てていけよ。

___________________________________

ロイ:今のは?
(Roi: Ima no wa)

今 (ima): is a noun meaning “now.” It is like “ashita” in that it doesn’t tend to take particles.

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix. It is here probably because “ima” is sometimes considered an adverb, and it wants to talk about “the thing now.”

は (wa): is the topical particle.

Here what Roy is asking is who the officer and the women were who just came out of his room.

Translation: “Roy: About the thing now?”

_________________

ハボック:オレの親と退役軍人局の人っすよ。
(Habboku: Ore no oya to taiekigunjin-kyo no hito ssu yo.”

オレ (ore): is a masculine first-person singular pronoun, so “I.”

の (no): is the genitive particle. The genitive of “I” is “my,” by the way, in case you didn’t catch that last time.

親 (oya): is a noun meaning “parent.” This being his mother.

と (to): is a parallel conjunction. This will translate to “and.” A parallel conjunction just means that both noun phrases serve the same function in the sentence.

退役軍人局 (taiekigunjin-kyo): is the noun “taiekigunjin,” meaning “veteran” or “ex-serviceman” and the suffix “-kyo,” meaning “office” or “administration.” So this is the “veteran’s office.”

の (no): is the genitive particle. This is a case where you can translate it as “of” but it may be better in translation to say “from.”

人 (hito): is a noun meaning “person.”

っす (ssu): is a truncation of “desu.”

よ  (yo): is the informative/emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “Havoc: [They] are my parent and a person of [or from] the veteran’s office.”

_________________

ハボック:退役の手続きを取りました。
(Habboku: Taieki no tetsudzuki wo torimashita.”

退役 (taieki): is the same word we saw before in “taiekigugnjin,” meaning “retirement.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

手続き (tetsudzuki): is a noun meaning “procedures,” as in all the stuff that has to be done in order to retire, paperwork and what not.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

取りました (torimashita): is the polite, indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “toru,” which is a verb that means many things and is a bit like “suru,” in that it means “to do” a variety of things. Its translation tends to be “to take.” Here it’s referring to doing the procedure, or “to take on.”

Translation: “Havoc: [I] have taken on the procedures of retirement.” 

_________________

ロイ:まだ治らんと決まったわけでは-
(Roi: Mada naoran to kimatta wake de wa-)

まだ (mada): is an adverb which means a lot of things, but here means “still” or “as yet.”

治らん (naoran): is a truncated form of “naoranai,” which is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of “naoru,” meaning “to get cured.”

と (to): is the quotative particle, which can sometimes be translated as “that,” because it does mark indirect statements. That’s something neat to keep in mind.

決まった (kimatta): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “kimaru,” meaning “to be decided.”

わけ (wake): is a noun meaning “reason.”

では (de wa): is a compound particle, equivalent to “wa.” This is the expression “wake de wa nai” left short, which means “it is not the case that.” It is used in the context of conclusions, as in “after all is said and done, this is (or isn’t) the case.” What Roy means to say here is that they have not reached this conclusion yet and that Havoc is acting hastily.

Translation: “Roy: It still isn’t the case that it has been decided that you will not be cured.” or “Roy: It still hasn’t been decided that you will not get cured.”

_________________  

ハボック:自分がもう使えないって分からないほど バカじゃないっす。
(Habokku: Jibun ga mou tsukaenai tte wakaranai hodo baka ja nai ssu.”

自分 (jibun): is a reflexive first-person singular pronoun meaning “myself.” This is a tricky pronoun, which we should talk about later. Just know that we will be using it as “I, myself,”

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

もう (mou): is the same adverb from before. With the negative it can mean “not anymore” or “no longer.”

使えない (tsukaenai): is the potential, negative, imperfective conjugation of “tsukau,” meaning “to use,” to this means “to cannot use.” This is a verb that in the potential is also used to mean “to be usable.” And this is the sense that we should take this in.

って (tte): is the casual quotative marker.

分からない (wakaranai): is the indicative, negative, imperfection conjugation of the verb “wakaru,” meaning “to understand.”

ほど (hodo): is a post-position meaning “extent to” or “to the point that” or “so… that”

バカ (baka): is a noun meaning “stupid.” This means “so stupid that…”

じゃ (ja): is a contraction of “de wa,” which we’ve seen before.

ない (nai): is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of “aru.” “Da” has no negative conjugation, because “da” comes from “de aru.”

っす (ssu): is the same as before. Just know that here it is being used to add politeness to the sentence, not because it is actually needed.

Translation: “Havoc: I am not so stupid that I don’t understand that I myself am no longer useful.”

_________________

ロイ:だが-
(Roi: Da ga-)

だ (da): is the copula.

が (ga): is a conjunction, meaning “though.” “da ga” is an expression meaning “However,” and it is very similar to “De wa,” where the copula is encapsulating what was previously said.

Translation: “Roy: However-”

_________________

ハボック:動けない駒はいらんでしょう?
(Habokku: Ugokenai kuma wa iran deshou?)

動けない (ugokenai): is the potential, negative, imperfective, imperfective conjugation of the verb “ugoku,” meaning “to move.” So this is “cannot move.”

駒 (kuma): is a a noun meaning “shogi piece.” It’s used in the same way as the word “pawn” is used in English.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

いらん (iran): is the truncated form of “iranai,” which is the negative, indicative, imperfective conjugation of “iru,” which isn’t the copula but is another verb meaning “to need.”

でしょう (deshou): is a verbal expression, somewhat similar to “ne,” being dubitative.

Translation: “Pieces that cannot move, [you] do not need [them], right?”

_________________

ハボック:なんて目してんだよ?
(Habokku: Nante me shite-n da yo?)

なんて (nante): is an adverb that expresses exasperation, for a lack of a better word. It’s like “What the-!” It sometimes gets translated as “why,” too, which we like personally.

目 (me): is a noun meaning “eye.” It colloquially takes “suru” to mean “to eye” or “to look” or “to stare.”

して (shite): is actually a truncation of “shite iru,” which is the periphrastic progressive, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “suru.” The word “periphrastic” means that an inflection is made through the use of another word or verb. In this case, the copula “iru” is paired with the gerund to mark “progressive” aspect. “Progressive” aspect refers to something going on continuously, as opposed to simply or perfectly, the former being ambiguous and the latter being completed. In English, this means “to be X-ing.” So this means “to be looking.”

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix.

だ (da): is the copula.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending suffix.

Translation: “Havoc: Why is [it] that are you looking at me?” 

_________________

ハボック:置いていけよ。
(Habokku: Oiteike yo.)

置いていけ (Oiteike): is the imperative conjugation of the verb “oiteiku,” meaning “to leave behind.” This verb comes from the gerund of “oku,” meaning “to put (and leave)” and “iku,” meaning “to go.”

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending suffix.

Translation: “Havoc: Leave [me] behind.”

_________________

ハボック:捨てていけよ。
(Habokku: Sutte ike yo.)

捨てていけ (Sutte ike): is a nuanced word made in the spirit of the last. “Sutte” is the gerund of “suteru,” meaning “to discard,” and “iku” is the same verb from before. So this means “to discard me and go.”

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending suffix.

Translation: “Havoc: Discard [me] and go.”

 


Facebook
Twitter InstagramSurveyPaypalPatreon