Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 23)

(cont’d) Scene 17 — Central Hospital, Havoc’s Room — Roy, Riza, Havoc

ハボック:あんたこんな下っ端に構ってる暇 あんのかよ。

ハボック:ヒューズ准将との約束があるんだろうが。

ハボック:同情なんていらねぇんだよ。

リザ:ハボック少尉。

ハボック:諦めさせてくれよ。

ハボック:頼むから。

ロイ:分かった。

ロイ:置いていく。

ロイ:置いていくから追いついてこい。      

ロイ:私は先に行く。

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ハボック:あんたこんな下っ端に構ってる暇あんのかよ。
(Habokku: Anta konna shitappa ni kamatteru hima anno ka yo.)

あんた (anta): is a colloquial second-person singular pronoun, “you.” It’s a truncated form of “anata.” Also note that we do not have a case particle. It would be “wa.”

こんな (konna): is an adjective meaning “like this.” The lexical root of this word, /k/, is just like /s/, which we’ve seen before in “sou” and “sono.” There are “kou” and “kono” counterparts.

下っ端 (shittapa): is a noun meaning “underling.”

に (ni): is the dative particle, marking the object of the verb.

構ってる (kamatteru): is the truncated periphrastic progressive, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “kamau,” meaning “to concern oneself with.” You’ll recall that the periphrastic progressive is made by “V(gerund) iru” well here all that’s happened is that the /i/ dropped out.

暇 (hima): is a noun meaning space time. The previous verb phrase is modifying this noun. This means “spare time to be concerning oneself with…”

あんの (anno): seems to be a contraction of “aru no,” which is the copula with the substantivizing suffix.

か (ka): is the interrogative particle.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “Havoc: Is it that, for you, [you] have the free time to be concerning yourself with underlings like this?”

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ハボック:ヒューズ准将との約束があるんだろうが。
(Habokku: Hyuuzu-junshou to no yakusoku ga aru-n darou ga.)

ヒューズ准将 (Hyuuzu-junshou): is the name “Hughes,” who was Roy’s best friend who was killed by the Homunculi, and the military rank “brigadier general,” (which in English as an address is shortened to “general,” as per standard military custom).

と (to): is the parallel conjunction. It’s working with the noun “yakusoku,” to means a “promise with General Hughes.”

の (no): is the genitive particle, also working with “yakusoku.” The use of both a conjunction and a case particle is seen in standard Japanese, but it is not the most common thing in the world. You cannot say “with of” in English, but the idea is that it’s a promise “with” and “of” someone we believe makes sense.

約束 (yakusoku): is the noun meaning “promise.”

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

ある (aru): is the copula.

ん (n): is the substantive particle.

だろう (darou): is actually just a more casual form of the verbal expression “deshou.” They mean the same thing.

が (ga): is the conjunction we saw once before. Often in Japanese sentences will end in “ga” in order to ask the addressee for a response.

Translation: “Havoc: Isn’t it that [you] have a promise with General Hughes?”

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ハボック:同情なんていらねぇんだよ。
(Habokku: Doujou nante iranee-n da yo.)

同情 (doujou): is a noun meaning “sympathy.”

なんて (nante): is the adverb we saw before. Here we see it as a suffix. It functions as a semi-despective suffix. One doesn’t need to translate it lexically. If one must, “such” or “stupid” “damn” could work.

いらねぇ (iranee): is a casual variation of “iranai,” which is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of the verb “iru,” meaning “to need.”

だ (da): is the copula.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “Havoc: [It] is the case that [I] do not need [your] sympathy.” or just “Havoc: [I] don’t need [your] sympathy.”

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リザ:ハボック少尉。
(Riza: Habboku-shoui.)

ハボック少尉 (Habboku-shoui): is Havoc’s name and his rank “shoui,” which is “second lieutenant.” Like with “brigadier general,” one is addressed in English by only the second word, so “lieutenant.”

Translation: “Riza: Lieutenant Havoc.”

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ハボック:諦めさせてくれよ。
(Habboku: Akiramesasete kure yo.)

諦めさせて (akiramesasete): is the causative gerund of the verb “akirameru,” which means “to give up.” The causative mood indicates that one is allowed to do something or made to do something. In this case, it is the former.

くれ (kure): is the imperative of “kureru,” which is a verb that serves as an auxiliary to indicate that something is done by another for one’s own benefit. So what this is saying is “let me quit (for my benefit)” We don’t tend to use the term “auxiliary” and all that, because it’s a bit of a misnomer, mind you, but we’ll allow it for now.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

Translation: “Havoc: Let me quit.”

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ハボック:頼むから。
(Habboku: Tanomu kara.)

頼む (tanomu): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to request” or even “to beg”

から (kara): is a post-position. A post-position is like a preposition, providing us with spatio-temporal information, but it comes after the phrase instead of before. “Kara” has a dual role of meaning “from” but also conjunctively meaning “because.” (We normally call one a post-position and another a conjunction, but there is good reason to believe they’re ultimately the same word.)

This is an expression meaning “because I will beg,” as in “for heaven’s sake!” or “please!” It’s a plea.

Translation: “Havoc: Because I will beg.”

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ロイ:分かった。
(Roi: Wakatta.)

わかった (wakatta): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of “wakaru,” meaning “to understand.” This verb, like quite a few others, is conjugated for the past to indicate that it is in effect. If you use the imperfective, it will sound like it will happen eventually. So that is why it is translated for the present most of the time.

Translation: “Roy: I have understood.”

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ロイ:置いていく。
(Roi: Oiteiku.)

置いていく (oiteiku): is the same verb as before, just in the indicative, imperfective, affirmative.

Translation: “Roy: [I] will leave you behind.”

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ロイ:置いていくから追いついてこい。
(Roi: OIteiku kara oitsuite koi.)

置いていく (oiteiku): is the same verb as before.

から (kara): is the post-position, also meaning “because.”

追いついて (oitsuite): is the gerund of “oitetsuku,” meaning “to catch up.” It is functioning conjunctively with the following verb.

こい (koi): is the imperative conjugation of “kuru,” meaning “to come.” (It is irregular.) So this means “come and catch up.” (This is an idiomatic thing, where a gerund + kuru means “to come and” and not the other way around, as it tends to be.)

Translation: “Roy: Because [I] will leave you behind, come and catch up.”

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ロイ:私は先に行く。
(Roi: Watashi wa saki-ni iku.)

私 (watashi): is the formal first-person singular pronoun, “I.”

は (wa): is the topical particle.

先に (saki-ni): is the noun “saki” meaning “before” or “ahead” with the adverbial suffix that nouns take, “-ni” (we honestly think it’s just the dative with a special function, but we’ll let it be for now.) “saki-ni” means “before (you)” or “ahead (of you)”

行く (iku): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to go.”

Translation: “Roy: As for me, [I] will go ahead (of you).”


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