Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 24)

(cont’d) Scene 17 — Central Hospital, Havoc’s Room — Roy, Riza, Havoc

ロイ:上で待っているぞ。

リザ:あの人は生きることを諦めようとした私でさえ見捨てようとしなかった。

リザ:背中を預けると言ってくれた。      

リザ:捨てられないのよ。

ハボック:バカだ。 

ハボック:そんな甘いことでこの国を上り詰められるわけないじゃないっすか。

リザ:そういうバカが一人くらいいてもいいと思うわ。

Scene 18 — Central Hospital, Hallway — Roy, Riza

ロイ:私の軍服を持ってきてくれ。

リザ:まだ退院できる状態ではー      

ロイ:持ってこい。      

リザ:了解しました。

___________________________________

ロイ:上で待っているぞ。
(Roi: Ue de matte iru zo.)

上 (ue): is a noun meaning “top” or “above”

で (de): is a post-position, meaning “at.” This is the post-position used to indicate location when we aren’t dealing with directions or destinations.

待っている (matte iru): is the perphrastic progressive, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “matsu,” meaning “to wait.”

ぞ (zo): is the masculine emphatic ending particle. It is very similar to “yo,” with the most notable exception being that “zo” will sometimes mark a sentence as imperative.

Translation: “Roy: I will be waiting for you at the top.”

_________________

リザ:あの人は生きることを諦めようとした私でさえ見捨てようとしなかった。
(Riza: Ano hito wa ikiru koto wo akirameyou to shita watashi de sae misuteyou to shinakatta.) 

あの (ano): is an adjective meaning “that,” being far away from both the speaker and the addressee. This /a/ is the third of the location stems we’ve seen, along with /s/ and /k/.

人 (hito): is a noun meaning “person.” This means “that person,” referring to Roy.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

生きる (ikiru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to live.”

こと (koto): is a noun meaning “thing.” This noun is often used to make the verb a noun, sharing this function with “no” (-n being saved for the end of sentences).

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

諦めよう (akirameyou): is the volitional conjugation of “akirameru,” meaning “to give up.” The volitional mood indicates that this is something that one wants to do.

と (to): is the quotative particle.

した (shita): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of “suru,” meaning “to do.” This is an expression: “V(volitional) to suru” means “about to V.”

私 (watashi): is the same pronoun as before. The previous verb phrase is modifying this noun, so this is “I, who was about to give up living.”

でさえ (de sae): is a suffix meaning “even” or “of all things.” You will find this suffix as “ni sae” and “sae,” as well. Our understanding is that once upon a time the three were used in different cases, but nowadays they can be interchanged without any major problems.

見捨てよう (misuteyou): is the volitional conjugation of “misuteru,” meaning “to abandon.”

と (to): is the quotative particle.

しなかった (shinakatta): is the indicative, past, negative conjugation of “suru.” This is the same expression as before.

Translation: “Riza: That person, [he] was not about to abandon even me, who was about to give up on living.”

_________________

リザ:背中を預けると言ってくれた。
(Riza: Senaka wo azukeru to itte kureta.)

背中 (senaka): is a noun meaning “back,” as in one’s anatomical back.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

預ける (azukeru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to entrust to.”

と (to): is the quotative particle.

言って (itte): is the gerund of the verb “iu,” meaning “to say.”

くれた (kureta): is the indicative, affirmative, past of “kureru.” This is another “Verb(gerund) + kureru” expression.

This is a bit of a strange sentence because we’re saying that “He said (for her benefit) that he will entrust his back (to her.)” Why that is to her benefit? We have no idea. We know that he’s entrusting his back to her specifically because this is a theme that comes up multiples times in the show.

Translation: “Riza: [He] said that [he] would entrust [his] back [to me].”

_________________      

リザ:捨てられないのよ。
(RIza: Suteranerai no yo.)

捨てられない (suterarenai): is the potential, imperfective, negative conjugation of the verb “suteru,” meaning “to throw away” or “to abandon.” But it can also be the passive, imperfective, negative.

So this either means “He cannot abandon (people)” or “You will not be abandoned.” Either one makes sense.

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

よ (yo): is the emphatic particle.

Translation: “Riza: [You] will not be abandonded” or “Riza: [He] cannot abandon [people.]”

_________________

ハボック:バカだ。
(Habokku: Baka da.)

We’ve seen both these words before!

Translation: “Havoc: [He] is stupid.”

_________________

ハボック:そんな甘いことでこの国を上り詰められるわけないじゃないっすか。
(Habokku: Sonna amai koto de kono kuni wo noboritsumerareru wake nai ja nai ssu ka.)

そんな (sonna): is the /s/ counterpart to “konna,” this one meaning “like that.”

甘い (amai): is the indicatve, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the adjectival verb meaning “sweet.”

こと (koto): is the same noun as before. Here we will translate it as “stuff,” because it isn’t just here for syntactic/functional purposes.

で (de): is the instrumental particle. The instrumental case indicates the means by which something is done, or the cause of it. It tends to get translated as “with.”

この (kono): is the adjective we spoke of briefly before, meaning “this.”

国 (kuni): is a noun meaning “country.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

上り詰められる (noboritsumerareru): is the potential, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “noboritsumeru,” meaning literally “to climb and be stationed” or “to make it to the top.”

わけ (wake): is the same noun we saw before. Here we will offer an alternative translation: “circumstance,” as in a circumstance where something done or reasoned is valid. Also note that there is no case particle here. It would be “ga.”

ない (nai): is the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of the copula “aru.” This is an expression. “X wake ga nai” is to say that “there is no circumstance where X,” as in “No way X”

じゃない (ja nai): is the verbal expression, equivalent to “ne.” Note that we are going to get into a number of other ending particles and that they will sound a bit weird all together as such. But this is anime, so bear with it please.

っす (ssu): is Havoc’s way of saying “desu.” This is here to add politeness.

か (ka): is the interrogative ending particle. (This is rhetorical.)

Translation: “Havoc: No way [he] can make it to the top with sweet stuff like that, huh?”

_________________

リザ:そういうバカが一人くらいいてもいいと思うわ。
(Riza: Sou iu baka ga hitotsu-kurai ite mo ii to omou wa.)

そういう (sou iu): is a verbal expression, meaning “such (as mentioned).”

バカ (baka): is the same noun as before, which we can translate as “idiot” here. You can almost always translate “baka” as “idiot,” except when it is attributive.

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

一人くらい (hitotsu-kurai): is the counter “hitotsu,” meaning “one person.” Counters function like noun-adverbs in that they do not tend to take particles. This means “One idiot.” “-kurai” is a suffix meaning “at least.” So altogether this means “at least one person.”

いて (ite): is the gerund of the copula “iru.”

も (mo): is the secondary particle, meaning “even” or “too.” The nominative particle that would be here drops out when “mo” succeeds it.

いい (ii): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the adjectival verb meaning “good.” “V(gerund) mo ii” is an expression meaning “one should V” or “it is good to V”

と (to): is the quotative particle.

思う (omou): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to think.”

わ (wa): is a feminine ending emphatic particle.

Translation: “Riza: [I] think that it is good to have at least one such idiot.”

___________________________________

ロイ:私の軍服を持ってきてくれ。
(Roi: Watashi no gunpuku wo motte kite kure.)

私 (watashi): is the same pronoun as before.

の (no): is the genitive particle.

軍服 (gunpuku): is a noun meaning “military uniform.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

持って (motte): is the gerund of the verb “motsu,” meaning “to possess” and, with “kuru,” meaning “to bring,” as in “to grab and come.”

きて (kite): is the gerund of “kuru,” this being another “V(gerund) + kuru” expression.

くれ (kure): is the imperative of “kureru.” This is another “V(gerund) + kureru” expression.

Translation: “Roy: Bring my military uniform (for my benefit.)”

_________________

リザ:まだ退院できる状態ではー
(Riza: Mada taiin dekiru joutai de wa-)

まだ (mada): is the adverb meaning “still.”

退院 (taiin): is a noun meaning “leaving the hospital.” This is one of those nouns that takes “suru” to become a verb.

できる (dekiru): is the conditional, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “suru.” this means “to be able to leave the hospital.”

状態 (joutai): is a noun meaning “condition” or “state.”

では (de wa): is the same compound particle from way back when. It’s equivalent to “wa.”

Translation: “Riza: Still a condition to be able to leave the hospital-”

_________________

ロイ:持ってこい。
(Roi: Motte koi.)

This is the same expression we saw before: 持ってくる, except that “kuru” is in the imperative form.

Translation: “Roy: Bring [it].”

_________________

リザ:了解しました。
(Riza: Ryoukai shimashita.)

了解 (ryoukai): is a noun meaning “understanding” or “comprehension.” It is one of these verbs that takes “suru.”

しました (shimashita): is the polite, indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “suru.” This is an expression, we believe, akin to the military’s “Roger.”

Translation: “Riza: Understood.”

 

Facebook Twitter InstagramSurveyPaypalPatreon