Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 (Part 28)

And we’re back! Just a friendly reminder that this weekend’s parts are rather long, and so please start at Part 27 so that you can see everything explained in detail.

ロイ:なめるな。 

ロイ:今日は快晴だ。

エドワード:そのかわりヘロヘロじゃねぇか。

エドーワド:使えねぇなーははは。

ロイ:うるさいな。

Scar appears

ロイ:来てしまったではないか。

エドワード:どうした?

エドワー ド:雨も降ってねぇのにびっしょりだぜ。

エドワー ド:待った、中尉。 

エドワー ド:撃っちゃダメだ。

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ロイ:なめるな。
(Roi: Nameru-na.)

なめるな (nameru-na): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to make fun” or “to mock” and the same negative imperative conjugation as before.

Translation: “Roy: Do not mock (me).”

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ロイ:今日は快晴だ。
(Roi: Kyou wa kaisei da.)

今日 (kyou): is a noun meaning “today.”

は (wa): is the topical particle.

快晴 (kaisei): is a noun meaning “good weather” or “cloudless weather.”

だ (da): is the copula.

Translation: “Roy: As for today, [there] is cloudless weather.”

For those who have never seen the show, Roy uses fire alchemy that requires the air to be dry and so he’s useless when it is raining.

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エドワード:そのかわりヘロヘロじゃねぇか。
(Edowaado: Sono kawari hero-hero ja nee ka.)

そのかわり (sono kawari): is the adjective “sono,” which we’ve seen before, and the noun “kawari,” meaning “substitute.” It’s an adverbial expression meaning “instead.”

ヘロヘロ (hero-hero): is a noun meaning “exhausted” or “deadbeat.”

じゃねぇ (ja nee): is a verbal expression that is equivalent to “ne.” It is a contraction of “de wa nai,” which is the compound particle “de wa,” which is equivalent to “wa,’ and “nai,” the indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of the copula “aru.”

か (ka): is the interrogative ending particle.

Translation: “Edward: Instead [you] are exhausted, aren’t you?”

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エドーワド:使えねぇなーははは。
(Edowaado: Tsukaenee na – hahaha.)

使えねぇ (tsukaenee): is a slurred pronunciation of the  potential, imperfective, negative conjugation of the verb “tsuku,” meaning “to use.” The potential mood indicates whether something can be done. “Tsukaenai” is frequently in reference to people who are useless.

な (na): is the same dubitative ending suffix as before.

ははは (hahaha): is the same as in English.

Translation: “Edward: [One] cannot use [you] – hahaha.” or “[You] are useless – hahaha.”

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ロイ:うるさいな。
(Roi: urusai-na.)

うるさいな (urusai-na): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the adjectival verb meaning “noisy.” This is the same negative imperative suffix.

Translation: “Roy: Do not be noisy.” or “Shut up.”

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ロイ:来てしまったではないか。
(Roi: Kitte shimatta de wa nai ka.)

来て (kitte): is the gerund of the verb “kuru,” meaning “to come.”

しまった (shimatta): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation meaning “to finish” or “to complete,” used idiomatically to express that the verb phrase with the gerund is an inconvenience or annoyance. We like to sometimes translate it lexically as “to come and X.” It is not necessary, though, and in this specific case it would sound very awkward.

ではない (de wa nai): is the same verbal expression from before, seen as “ja nee.”

か (ka): is the interrogative ending suffix.

Translation: “Roy: [He] came, didn’t he?”

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エドワード:どうした?
(Edowaado: Dou shita?)

どう (dou): is an adverb meaning “how?” It is the /d/ version of “sou.”

した (shita): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “suru,” meaning “to do.” “Dou shita” is a bit of an expression meaning “What’s the matter?”

Translation: “Edward: What’s the matter?”

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エドワー ド:雨も降ってねぇのにびっしょりだぜ。
(Edowaado: Ame mo futte nee no ni bisshori da ze.)

雨 (ame): is a noun meaning “rain.”

も (mo): is a secondary particle meaning “even.” It goes after the case particle, but when paired with “wa,” “wo,” or “ga,” it drops out. In this case, it is “ga” that dropped out.

降ってねぇ (futte nee): is a slurred pronunciation of the periphrastic progressive, indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of “furu,” meaning “to fall.” “ame ga furu,” means “to rain.” The periphrastic progressive, we almost forgot to mention, is make with the gerund plus the copula “iru.” In this case, our “iru” is conjugated to the past, and as is often the case, the /i/ dropped out. So we went from “inai” to “nai,” and that got slurred.

のに (no ni): is a compound particle, serving as a conjunction, coming from the substantivizing suffix and the dative particle, meaning “even though.”

びっしょり (bisshori): is a noun meaning “soaked” or “drenched.”

だ (da): is the copula.

ぜ (ze): is a masculine emphatic ending particle, like “yo.”

Translation: “Edward: Even though not even rain is falling, you are still drenched.”

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エドワー ド:待った、中尉。
(Edowaado: Matta, chuui.)

待った (matta): is the the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “matsu,” meaning “to wait.” What was meant to be said, probably, was “matte,” the gerund of the same verb. The gerund, then is used as an imperative.

中尉 (chuui): is the military rank of “first lieutenant.” This is Edward speaking to Liza. It tends to be the case with military ranks that, when addressing the person, one says only the last word, or the noun. So she would be called “lieutenant.”

Translation: “Edward: Wait, lieutenant.”

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エドワー ド:撃っちゃダメだ。
(Edowaado: uccha dame da.)

撃っちゃ (uccha): is a contraction of “utte wa,” which is the gerund of the verb “utsu,” meaning “to shoot (someone)” and the topical particle. This is a case where we get to translate the gerund as something more gerund-ish: “shooting.”

ダメ (dame): is a noun meaning “no good.”

だ (da): is the copula.

Translation: “As for shooting (him), [that] is no good.”