Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 25)

We’re back! This week we are looking at just two parts and two scenes. Please remember to look here before looking at Part 26. Also, we’ll remind everyone that these lines make more sense when you watch the episode, so please watch Episode 21 if you haven’t done so already. 

Scene 19 — Central City Streets — Edward, Alphonse, Stand person, Driver, Women, Men

屋台の人:なんてことしてくれたんだよ?      

運転者:すっーすみません。

屋台の人:こりゃ今日は休業だな。

エドワード:お困りのようですねぇ。

エドワード:国家錬金術師エドワード·エルリック参上。

屋台の人:すげぇな、坊主。

運転者:ありがとうございます。

運転者:お礼はいくらお払いすればー

エドワード:お礼?

エドワード:そんなもの無用無用。

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屋台の人:なんてことしてくれたんだよ?
(Taisha no hito: nante koto shite kureta-n da yo?)

なんて (nante): is an adverb/interjection meaning “what!” as in an exclamation. Adverbs in Japanese sometimes function adjectivally. This is the case here.

こと (koto): is a noun meaning “thing,” and so together with “nante” this means “What a thing!,” which one can translate simply as “what!”

して (shite): is the gerund of the verb “suru,” meaning “to do.” The gerund is a special conjugation of a verb used for a variety of reasons, in this case for an expression.

くれた (kureta): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to give (to one or someone close to one).” This is a very common expression in Japanese; “V(gerund) + kureru,” meaning “to V (for one’s benefit)” here being used sarcastically.

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix. All this means is that the entire verb phrase is treated as a noun. We’ve translated this “-n” and its “no” counterpart to make it reflect this somewhat, but it is not really necessary.

だ (da): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the copula. The copula is the “to be” or “to have” verb in a language. Japanese has 3 copulae: “da,” “aru,” and “iru.”

よ (yo): is an emphatic ending suffix. It can be emphatic in a number of ways, just being expressive or conveying information. Here it is more of the former.

Translation: “Stand person: What (a thing) have you done (to me)?”

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運転者:すっーすみません。
(Untensha: Su- sumimasen.)

すみません (sumimasen): is an expression equivalent to English’s “Sorry” or “Excuse me.” In this case, it is the former. What the expression is is the polite, indicative, imperfective, negative conjugation of “sumu,” which means “to feel at ease.” (Note: This is an expression often used when someone has done one a favor.)

Translation: “Driver: Sorry.” or “Driver: I do not feel at ease.”

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屋台の人:こりゃ今日は休業だな。
(Taisha no hito): Korya kyou wa kyuugyou da na.)

こりゃ (korya): is a contraction of “kore wa,” which is a bit of an expression meaning something like “Well now” or “Hey.” The important thing for us is that you don’t go believing this sentence has two topics.

今日 (kyou): is a noun meaning “today.”

は (wa): is the topical particle. The topical case marks the topic of the sentence and acts independently from the rest of the sentence. It isn’t the subject of the sentence. It just sometimes looks that way because English needs a subject and in translation the topic is made the subject.

休業 (kyuugyou): is a noun meaning “closing (of a shop).”

だ (da): is the copula. Note that even though this is an “is” sentence, it is fine to translate this more verbally, as in “to close.”

な (na): is a casual dubitative ending particle, meaning “I wonder” or “huh?”

Translation: “Stand person: Well now, as for today, [the shop] is closing, huh?”

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エドワード:お困りのようですねぇ。
(Edowaado: O-komari no you desu nee.)

お困り(o-komari): is the participle of “komaru,” a verb meaning “to be in trouble” with the honorific prefix “o-.” This honorific suffix is very common in Japanese and tends to not need a lexical translation.

の (no): is the genitive particle. The genitive marks possession or categorization. In more simple terms, it’s like “of” in English. “X no Y” tends to translate to “Y of X.” And if that doesn’t really work, it will put you in a good ballpark of what it should mean.

よう (you): is a noun meaning “form” or “semblance.” One can say “the semblance of trouble,” and that will put you in the right ballpark of how one may want to translate it more nicely, as “it seems that there is trouble” or something like that.

です (desu): is the polite, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the copula. “da.”

ねぇ (nee): is an enlongation of “ne,” which is the more standard version of “na,” and works the same.

Translation: “Edward: [There] is a semblance of [one] being in trouble, huh?”

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エドワード:国家錬金術師エドワード·エルリック参上。
(Edowaado: Kekka renkinjitsu-shi Edowaado Erurikku sanjou.)

国家 (kekka): is a noun meaning “the state” or “the government,” and it is modifying the next noun adjectivally.

錬金術師 (renkinjitsu-shi): is a noun meaning “alchemist.” “Renkinjitsu” is the noun meaning “alchemy,” and “-shi” is a suffix meaning “person” or “specialist.”

エドワード·エルリック (Edowaado Erikku): is Edward’s full name: “Edward Elric.”

参上 (sanjou): is a noun meaning “calling on” or “visit.” To our knowledge, this is not a popular phrase, but it is similar to a “This is a job for…” kind of expression.

Note that we do not have a verb or a topic or a subject to point us in the right direction. In this case, you’re allowed a “there/this/that/it is” in your translation.

Translation: “Edward: [This is] a calling on state alchemist Edward Elric.”

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屋台の人:すげぇな、坊主。
(Taisha no hito: Sugee na, bouzu.)

すげぇ (Sugee): is a casual way of saying “sugoi,” which is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the adjectival verb meaning “amazing.”

な (na): is the same as before.

坊主 (bouzu): is a noun meaning “sonny” or “fellow.” It’s not a very common noun, and historically it has other meanings, but it has shown up here.

Translation: “Stand person: “[That is] amazing, isn’t it, sonny?”

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運転者:ありがとうございます。
(Untensha: arigatou gozaimasu.)

ありがとうございます (arigatou gozaimasu): is an expression meaning “thank you (very much.)” “Arigatou” is a bit difficult to explain, but here’s the gist. This is another combination of terms. “Ari” is participial form of “aru,” which is a copula. The “gatou” part comes is related the lexical stem “kata,” which means “difficult.” The /k/ got voiced into /g/. The /a/ becoming an /o/ is a historical development. “Gozaimasu” is an old copula used to humble oneself, conjugated for the polite, indicative, imperfective, affirmative.

Translation: “Driver: Thank you.”

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運転者:お礼はいくらお払いすればー
(Untensha: O-rei wa ikura o-harai sureba-)

お礼 (o-rei): is the noun “rei,” meaning “reward” or “gesture of appreciation” with the honorific prefix we saw before.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

いくら (ikura): is an adverb meaning “how much?”

お払いすれば (oharai sureba): is the honorific prefix with the participial form of the verb “harau,” meaning “to pay.” Then we have the “-eba” conditional conjugation of “suru.” “o-V(participle) suru” is a construction used in humble language, a form of polite language used to lower oneself, to mean “to V”

Translation: “Driver: As for a reward, how much if I paid-”

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エドワード:お礼?
(Edowaado: o-rei?)

Translation: “Edward: Payment?”

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エドワード:そんなもの無用無用。
(Edowaado: Sonna mono muyou muyou.)

そんな (sonna): is an adjective meaning “like that” or “such.” We’ll bring up this word again later, so keep it in mind.

もの (mono): is a noun meaning “thing.” Note that we do not have a case particle stated for this noun, but it would be “wa.”

無用 (muyou): is a noun meaning “unnecessary.”

Because we do not have a verb, we are allowed an “is.”

Translation: “Edward: Such a thing [is] unnecessary, unnecessary.”