Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 26)

(cont’d) Scene 19 — Central City Streets — Edward, Alphonse, Stand person, Driver, Women, Men

女:大切な壺を壊してしまったの。

女:直してもらえるかしら?

エドワード:お安いご用さ。      

エドワード:エドワード·エルリック、あなたの街の国家錬金術師  エドワード·エルリックでございま~す。

男1:これも頼むぜ  

男2:直してくれ~  

Scene 20 — Street-side Café —  Edward, Alphonse, Roy, Riza

エドワード:街中オレの噂で持ちきりだな。      

アルフォンス:これだけ派手にやればね。

ロイ:柄にもないことをしているな、鋼の。

エドワード:大佐、もう退院していいのかよ。

ロイ:まあな  

エドワード:ハボック少尉のことを聞いた。

エドワード:ドクター·マルコーならー  

ロイ:待て、人目につく、乗りたまえ。

ロイ:やっぱり降りたまえ。

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女:大切な壺を壊してしまったの。
(Onna: Taisetsu-na tsubo wo kowashite shimatta no.)

大切な (taisetsu-na): is the noun “taisetsu,” meaning “important” or “cherished” with the verbal/adjectival suffix “-na” which is used for many nouns to function adjectivally.

壺 (tsubo): is a noun meaning “vase.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle. The accusative marks the direct object of a verb.

壊してしまった (kowashite shimatta): is the gerund of the verb “kowasu,” meaning “to break.” Along with it we have the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “shimau,” meaning “to complete,” but it is used idiomatically to express frustration or inconvenience because of an event. In this case, it is because she broke her vase. If you want to express the “shimatta” lexically, we recommend “went and V.” That’ll get the job done.

の (no): is a substantivizing suffix, just like the “-n” we saw before. (In fact, “-n” comes from this “-no.”)

Translation: “Woman: [I] broke [my] cherished vase.” or “Woman: [It is] the case that [I] went and broke [my] cherished vase.”

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女:直してもらえるかしら?
(Onna: Naoshite moraeru kashira?)

直して (naoshite): is the gerund of the verb “naosu,” meaning “to correct” or “to fix.”

もらえる (moraeru): is the potential, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “morau,” meaning “to receive.” “Morau” is a verb like “kureru,” which is used idiomatically to express action done for one’s benefit. In this case, the subject is the benefactor and the speaker is the benefited. The “potential” mood indicates the possibility of something happening. The “indicative,” as we know, indicates whether or not something factually did or will happen. So this translates to “can fix (for me)”

かしら (kashira): is a feminine ending particle meaning “I wonder.”

Translation: “Woman: Can he fix [it] (for me), I wonder?”

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エドワード:お安いご用さ。
(Edowaado: O-yasui goyou sa.)

お安い (o-yasui): is the honorific prefix “o-” and the adjectival verb conjugated for the indicative, imperfective, affirmative meaning “easy.”

ご用 (go-you): is the honorific prefix “go-” and the noun “you,” meaning task.” This is a commonly used expression meaning “[It is] a simple task.” or “Piece of cake,” if you prefer to see it with an idiomatic parallel.

さ (sa): is a masculine assertive ending particle. It is a bit like “yo” in this regard.

Translation: “Edward: [It is] an easy task.”

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エドワード:エドワード·エルリック、あなたの街の国家錬金術師  エドワード·エルリックでございま~す。
(Edowaado: Edowaado Erurikku, anata no machi no kekka renkinjitsu-shi Edowaado Erikku de gosaimaasu.)

エドワード·エルリック (Edowaado Erurikku): is Edward’s name.

あなた (anata): is a second-person singular pronoun, “you.”

の (no): is the genitive particle. The genitive of “you” is “your.”

街 (machi): is a noun meaning “town” or “neighborhood”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

国家錬金術師  (kekka renkinjitsu-shi): is the same nouns we saw before. Altogether, one can translate this to “you neighborhood state alchemist.” That sounds more natural than “your state alchemist of the town.”

でございま~す (de gozaimaasu): is the humble version of the copula “da.” “Gozaimasu” is the humble version of “aru,” and “de aru” is where “da” comes from.

Translation: “Edward: Edward Elric, your neighborhood state alchemist, [I] am Edward Elric.”

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男1:これも頼むぜ
(Otoko 1: Kore mo tanomu ze.)

これ (kore): is a pronoun meaning “this (thing).” Remember the “sonna” I told you to remember? That stem, /s/, and this stem, /k/, are siblings, and you can switch them in and out of these words. “konna” is also a word, and so is “sore.” They are location morphemes, which is means they refer to something close to the speaker and something close to the addressee.

も (mo): is a secondary particle, meaning “too,” or “even.” A secondary particle goes after the case particle. However, when you have “wo,” “ga,” or “wa,” they will drop out and only “wo” will remain. In this case, it is “wo.”

頼む (tanomu): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to entrust” or “to request.”

ぜ (ze): is a masculine emphatic particle. It is much like “yo,” the only big difference being that “ze” can also function as an imperative ending particle.

Translation: “Man 1: I request this, too.”

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男2:直してくれ~
(Otoko 2: Naoshite kuree)

直してくれ (naoshite kuree): is the same kind of idiomatic expression we saw before, expect that instead of “moraeru,” we have “kure,” which is the imperative conjugation of “kureru.” The “imperative” mood indicates a command.

Translation: “Man 2: Fix [this] (for me).”

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エドワード:街中オレの噂で持ちきりだな。
(Edowaado: Machijuu ore no uwasa de machikiri da na.)

街中 (machijuu): is a noun meaning “the whole town.” Note that we do not have a case particle here, it would have been “wa.”

オレ (ore): is a masculine first-person singular pronoun, “I.”

の (no): is the genitive particle. We recommend that you translate this as “about” and not “of me” or “my” because that’s just how this noun phrase is expressed in English.

噂 (uwasa): is a noun meaning “rumor.” We recommend you translate this as plural.

で (de): is the instrumental particle. The instrumental case marks a cause or instrument used to bring something about. We’ll translate this as “with” or “because of.”

持ちきり (machikiri): is a noun meaning “hot topic,” as in the thing everybody’s talking about.

だ (da): is the copula.

な (na): is the same ending particle as before.

Translation: “Edward: As for the whole town, because of the rumors about me [I] am a hot topic, huh?”

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アルフォンス:これだけ派手にやればね。
(Arufonsu: Kore-dake hade-ni yareba ne.)

これだけ (kore-dake): is the pronoun from before with the suffix “-dake,” meaning “only.” “kore-dake” serves as an adverbial expression meaning “so much” or “so little,” as in “only this (compared to what it could possibly be in amount).” It’s like a kid getting only one gift for his birthday and saying they got “just this.” In this case, it’s referring to Edward not doing too much, but doing it in a specific manner.

派手に (hade-ni): is the noun “hade,” meaning “flashy” and the dative particle, serving as the dative of manner, which translates adverbially. So “flashily.” This is our debut of a dative of manner as something we’re accepting instead of a separate suffix.

やれば (yareba): is the “-eba” conditional conjugation of the verb meaning “to do.” It is a more masculine, grittier counterpart to “suru.”

ね (ne): is the ending particle.

Translation: “Alphonse: If you do just this (stuff) flashily, right?”

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ロイ:柄にもないことをしているな、鋼の。
(Roi: Gara ni mo nai koto wo shite iru na, Hagane no.)

柄 (gara): is a noun meaning “stem” or “one’s nature.”

にも (ni mo): is a compound particle, simply the dative particle and the secondary particle.

ない (nai): is the indicative, negative, imperfective conjugation of the copula “aru.” “X ni aru” means “to be X,” as in “a state of X.” So this means “to not even be in a state of one’s nature.” This is actually an expression meaning roughly “to be out of character.”

こと (koto): is a noun meaning “thing.” It is used to make verb phrases nouns, much like “no.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

している (shite iru): is the periphrastic, progressive, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “suru,” meaning “to do.” The term “periphrastic” means that a conjugation requires another verb, in this case the copula “iru” with the gerund of the verb. This creates “progressive” aspect, meaning that an action is being done continuously, which in English is expressed as “to be V-ing.”

な (na): is the ending particle.

鋼の (Hagane no): is Edward’s official epithet. It is the noun “hagane,” meaning “steel” and the genitive particle. The full title is “hagane no renkinjitsu-shi,” meaning “alchemist of steel.” In the official translation, this is “Fullmetal.” We’ll use this here, too.

Translation: “Roy: You are doing things that are out of character, huh, Fullmetal?”

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エドワード:大佐、もう退院していいのかよ。
(Edowaado: Taisa, mou taiin shite ii no ka yo.)

大佐 (taisa): is a noun meaning “colonel.”

もう (mou): is an adverb meaning “already.”

退院して (taiin shite): is the noun “taiin,” meaning “leaving the hospital” with the gerund of the verb “suru.” Many nouns in Japanese take the verb “suru” to become verbs. This is one of them.

いい (ii): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the adjectival verb meaning “good.” This is an expression: “V(te) (mo) ii,” meaning “is it okay to V?”

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

かよ (ka yo): is a compound ending particle, being the emphatic and interrogative ending particles. This is used casually to express doubt.

Translation: “Edward: Colonel, is it okay to already leave the hospital?”

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ロイ:まあな  

まあ (maa): is an interjection expressing hesitation to say something (in this case that he left the hospital early.) It’s English equivalent may be “Well…”

な (na): is the ending particle.

Translation: “Roy: Well…, you know?”

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エドワード:ハボック少尉のことを聞いた。
(Edowaado: Habokku shoui no koto wo kiita.)

ハボック少尉 (Habokku shoui): is the name “Havoc” and his military rank, “second lieutenant,” which is being used as an address suffix.

のこと (no koto): is an idiomatic expression meaning “thing of,” which with people serves as a kind of suffix to emphasize them, a bit like saying “themselves.” This does not need to be translated lexically.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

聞いた (kiita): is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to hear” or “to hear about.”

Translation: “Edward: [I] heard about lieutenant Havoc.”

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エドワード:ドクター·マルコーならー
(Edowaado: Dokutaa Marukoo nara-)

ドクター·マルコー (Dokutaa Marukoo): is a character, “Doctor Marcoh.” The use of the term “dokutaa” is not standard in Japanese. Doctors in Japanese tend to take the address suffix “-sensei.” So this is a bit of an anime thing.

なら (nara): is a conditional suffix. However, this is a bit of an expression. Let us explain. “Nara” takes verb phrases, as in “If VERB PHRASE, Y” With just a noun phrase, what has probably happened is that a copula has dropped out, meaning “if there is X, Y,” which is an vote of confidence for X, as in Y will happen if X is there. So, idiomatically, it means something like “NOUN PHRASE for sure.”

Translation: “Edward: Doctor Marcoh for sure-” or “If (we have) Doctor Marcoh-”

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ロイ:待て、人目につく、乗りたまえ。
(Roi: Matte, hitome ni tsuku, norita mae.)

待て (matte): is the gerund of the verb “matsu,” meaning “to wait.” The gerund here is being used as an imperative.

人目 (hitome): is a noun meaning “public notice” or “people’s eyes.”

に (ni): is the dative particle. It marks the indirect object. The direct object is something like “ourselves” or “our conversation.” This is an expression.

つく (tsuku): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to attach” or “to affix.” “To affix [oneself] to public notice” is to say “to attract attention.”

乗りたまえ (norita mae): is an imperative expression, coming form “V(past) omae,” meaning “You, who have V-ed,” as in, “make yourself ‘person who has V-ed” as in “go do V.” (Or that is what we suspect and what makes sense. We may have given a folk etymology. We’ll look into this, but it just seems so clever…” This is the indicative, past, affirmative conjugation of the verb “noru,” meaning “to ride” or “to board” or “to get in.”

Translation: “Roy: Wait, [we] will attract attention, get in.”

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ロイ:やっぱり降りたまえ。
(Roi: Yappari orita mae)

やっぱり (yappari): is an adverb meaning “as expected.” Here it is being used because Roy figured that Edward and Alphonse wouldn’t both fit in the small car.

降りたまえ (orita mae): is the same imperative expression as before, but here with the verb “oriru,” meaning “to get off” or “to get out.”

Translation: “Roy: As [I] thought, get out.”