Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood Episode 21 Runthrough (Part 29)

And we’re back! This is a gentle reminded that this is a continuation of Parts 28 and 27, so please start reading at Part 27 so you don’t miss out on any explanations and details!

リザ:何を言ってるの?

エドワー ド:大佐をまねて釣りでもしてみようかと思ってんだ。

アルフォンス:兄さんを餌にホムンクルスを引っ張り出します。

アルフォンス:兄さんはヤツらにとって死なせてはならない人柱だから。    

ロイ:ムチャな。

アルフォンス:もう犠牲者を出すのはイヤなんです。

アルフォンス:僕か兄さんが餌になるしかないでしょ。

ロイ:ホムンクルスが出てくる前に スカーが憲兵に撃ち殺されたらどうする?

アルフォンス:そこは大佐がうまくやってくれるでしょ?

ロイ:この私をあごで使うか。

ロイ:いい度胸だ。

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リザ:何を言ってるの?
(Riza: Nani wo itte ru no?)

何 (nani): is the interrogative pronoun.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

言ってる (itte ru): is the truncated perphrastic progressive, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of “iu,” meaning “to say.” Here the /i/ in “iru” dropped out again.

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

Translation: “Riza: “What is it you’re saying?”

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エドワー ド:大佐をまねて釣りでもしてみようかと思ってんだ。
(Edowaado: Taisa wo manete tsuri de mo shite miyou ka to omotte-n da.)

大佐 (Taisa): is the noun meaning “colonel.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

まねて (manete): is the gerund of the verb “maneru,” meaning “to mimic.” The gerund here is being conjunctival, meaning that it is uniting one verb phrase with another. So this means “[I] will mimic the colonel, and…”

釣り (tsuri): is a noun meaning “fishing” or “angling.”

でも (de mo): is a compound particle. The “de” is the instrumental particle, which marks the tool used in an action or the cause of something. The reason this is here is unknown to us. The “mo” is the secondary particle.

して (shite): is the gerund of the verb “suru.” The noun “tsuri” is one of many that takes the verb “suru” to become a verb. (Though it should be said that this is a newer word since 釣る, “tsuru,” “to angle,” is already a word.) In this case, the gerund is working with the following verb. This is a metaphorical use of the word, meaning to try to lure someone out. This is in reference to the Homunculi, who are the other antagonists.

みよう (miyou): is the volitional conjugation of the verb “miru,” which when with a gerund means “to see if X” or “to try to X.”

か (ka): is the interrogative ending particle. The volitional interrogative is the hortative “Shall [I] X?”

と (to): is the quotative particle.

思って (omotte): is the truncated periphrastic progressive, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “omou,” meaning “to think.” In this case the entire “iru” dropped out.

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix.

だ (da): is the copula.

Translation: “Edward: “It’s that I’m thinking ‘Shall I imitate the colonel and try to fish, too?’”

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アルフォンス:兄さんを餌にホムンクルスを引っ張り出します。
(Arufonsu: Nii-san wo esa ni Homunkurusu wo hipparidashimasu.)

兄さん (nii-san): is the honorific noun for “elder brother” and the standard address suffix.

を (wo): is the accusative particle. Its exact use is eluding us. We will talk about it when we get to the verb.

餌 (esa): is a noun meaning “bait.”

に (ni): is the dative particle. It is marking the role of the the noun.

ホムンクルス (Homunkurusu): are the other antagonists that we mentioned a moment ago.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

引っ張り出します (hipparidashimasu): is the polite, indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb “hipparidasu,” meaning “to draw out.” What we’re talking about is “to draw out the Homunculi using Edward as bait.” One can say that perhaps this verb takes two objects because it comes from two verbs anyways. And that is our strongest theory.

Translation: “Alphonse: [He] will draw out the Homunculi using older brother (himself) as bait.” or “[He] will stretch older brother (himself) as bait and reveal the Homunculi.” (Don’t hold us entirely to this last one just yet.)

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アルフォンス:兄さんはヤツらにとって死なせてはならない人柱だから。
(Arufonsu: Nii-san wa yatsu-ra ni totte shinasete wa naranai hitobarashi kara.)

兄さん (nii-san): is the same as before.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

ヤツら (yatsu-ra): is the same as before.

にとって (ni totte): is an adverbial expression meaning “concerning”  or “as far as N is concerned.” It comes from the dative particle and the gerund of the verb “toru,” meaning to take, translating more literally to “if one takes N.”

死なせて (shinasete): is the causative gerund conjugation of the verb “shinu,” meaning “to die.” The causative mood marks an action that is allowed to or made to happen. In this case, it is about allowance. Also, the gerund here is part of an expression.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

ならない (naranai): is the same conjugation of “naru” we saw before. The expression “V(gerund) wa naranai” translates to “must not V” or “it will not be (so) to V.”

人柱 (hitobarashi): is a noun meaning “human sacrifice.”

だ (da): is the copula.

から (kara): is the conjunction from before.

Translation: “Alphonse: [It] is because as for older brother, as far as those guy are concerned, [he] is a human sacrifice that must not be allowed to die.”

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ロイ:ムチャな。
(Roi: Mucha na.)

ムチャ (mucha): is a noun meaning “absurd.”

な (na): is the dubitative ending particle.

Translation: “Roy: [This is] absurd, isn’t it?”

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アルフォンス:もう犠牲者を出すのはイヤなんです。
(Arufonsu: Mou giseisha wo dasu no wa iya-na-n desu.)

もう (mou): is the same adverb as before.

犠牲者 (giseisha): is a noun meaning “victims.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

出す (dasu): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to take out.” It is used with a lot of nouns as expressions, in this case meaning “to cause casualties” or “to claim victims.”

の (no): is the substantivizing suffix.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

イヤな (iya-na): is the noun “iya,” meaning “bad” or “disagreeable” with the verbal adjectival suffix “-na,” which is used for certain nouns when they modify another noun, hence being used adjectivally. The “-n” and “no” suffixes are technically noun. Japanese has nouns that require modification- and those are called “dependent nouns.”

ん (n): is the substantivizing suffix.

です (desu): is the polite form of the copula.

Translation: “Alphonse: It is that [them] claiming victims again is disagreeable.”

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アルフォンス:僕か兄さんが餌になるしかないでしょ。
(Arufonsu: Boku ka nii-san ga esa ni naru shika nai desho.)

僕 (boku): is the masculine first-person singular pronoun.

か (ka): is the disjunctive conjunction, translating to “or.”

兄さん (nii-san): is the same as before.

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

餌 (esa): is the same as before.

に (ni): is the dative particle, being used in the same manner as before.

なる (naru): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the verb meaning “to become,” which we already know. “ni naru,” is often used to mean “to play the role of” or “to become as,” if you want to be literal.

しかない (shika nai): is the suffix “shika,” meaning “only,” as in an unsatisfactory number/action/result and the negative conjugation of the copula “aru.” “Shika” works with negatives. With “nai,” it means something like “there is nothing else but to X,” as in “we had no choice but to X.”

でしょ (desho): is the polite form of the verbal expression “darou” we saw before.

Translation: “Alphonse: [There] is nothing but for myself or older brother to become as bait, [we] believe.”

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ロイ:ホムンクルスが出てくる前にスカーが憲兵に撃ち殺されたらどうする?
(Roi: Homunkurusu ga detekuru mae ni Sukaa ga kenpei ni uchikorosaretara dou suru?)

ホムンクルス (Homunkurusu): is the “Homunculi.”

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

出て (dete): is the gerund of the verb “deru,” meaning “to come out.”

くる (kuru): is the verb from before, meaning to do something for one’s benefit.

前 (mae): is the same noun from before. When it’s being modified by a verb phrase it is indicating that an action is to happen before the modifying verb. That is to say, “X mae ni Y” means “To Y before X”

に (ni): Is the dative particle, marking time.

スカー (Sukaa): is “Scar.”

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

憲兵 (kenpei): is a noun meaning “military police.”

に (ni): is the dative particle. It marks the agent of a passive verb’s action.

撃ち殺されたら (uchikorosaretara): is the -ra conditional conjugation of the indicative, passive of the verb “uchikorosu,” meaning “to shoot dead.”

どう (dou): is the same adverb as before.

する (suru): is the same verb as before.

Translation: “Roi: If Scar is shot to death by the military police before the Homunculi come out, how will [you] act?”

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アルフォンス:そこは大佐がうまくやってくれるでしょ?
(Arufonsu: Soko wa taisa ga umakuyatte kureru desho?)

そこ (soko): is the same pronoun as before, but in this case it is referring to a “situation,” so one can say “that case.”

は (wa): is the topical particle. You can translate “soko wa” as “in that case.”

大佐 (taisa): is the same noun as before.

が (ga): is the the nominative particle.

うまくやって (umakuyatte): is the gerund of the verb “umakuyaru,” meaning “to manage successfully,” or more literally “to do skillfully.”

くれる (kureru): is the same verb as before.

でしょ (desho): is the same as before, here being used more dubitatively, seeking validation from the listener.

Translation: “Alphonse: As for that case, the colonel will manage [it] successfully (for our benefit), right?”

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ロイ:この私をあごで使うか。
(Roi: Kono watashi wo ago de tsukau ka.)

この (kono): is an adjective meaning “this.” This is the /k/ version of the “sono” adjective we’ve seen before. There is supposed to be a topical particle here, but it dropped out.

私 (watashi): is the first-person singular pronoun.

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

あごで使う (ago de tsukau): is the noun “ago,” coming from “arrogance,” the instrumental particle, and the verb “tsukau,” meaning “to use.” It’s an expression meaning “to push someone around arrogantly.”

か (ka): is the interrogative ending particle.

Translation: “Roy: As for this, you are arrogantly bossing me around?”

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ロイ:いい度胸だ。
(Roi: Ii dokyou da.)

いい度胸 (ii dokyou): is the indicative, imperfective, affirmative conjugation of the adjectival verb meaning “good” and the noun meaning “courage.” it is an expression meaning “nerve” or “cockiness.”

だ (da): is the copula. Here the copula can be translated as “to have.”

Translation: “Roy: [You] have nerve.”