Dragon Ball: Xenoverse (Part 3)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

We made it to Part 3! Okay, so we’re finally starting the game. The game begins with a series of flashbacks through the Dragon Ball timeline. The first place the game takes you is to Goku’s battle with Frieza when the planet is exploding (the infamous 5 minutes.) And this is part of that dialogue that occurs while they’re fighting.

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ): 時間稼ぎ か … あの ガキ たち が この 星 を 脱出 する ため の …

孫悟空:時間稼ぎだと? そんな必要はない。きさまは死ぬこれからここで …

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ): < っくくくく …

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ): でかいクチをきくのもそこまでだ !!!! いま すぐだまらせてやるぞ !!!!

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ): このしつこいくたばりぞこないめ …..

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ) :いいだろう !! こんどはこっぱみじんにしてやるあの地球人のように 

孫悟空: あの地球人のように ? …… クリリンのことか .

フリーザ ( 最終形態フルパワー ): 時間稼ぎか … あのガキたちがこの星を脱出するための …
(Furiiza (saishuu keitai furu-pawaa): jikan kasegi ka… ano gaki-tachi kago no hoshi wo dasshutsu suru tame no…)

フリーザ  (furiiza): is the villain here, Frieza. He’s an alien of an unidentified race who has like 4 forms.

最終 (saishuu): is a noun meaning “last.”

形態 (keitai): is a noun meaning “form.”

フルパワー (furu-pawaa): is the loanword/phrase meaning “full power.”

時間 (jikan): is a noun meaning “time period.”

稼ぎ (kasegu): is the verbal stem, or participle, of “sakegu,” meaning “to labor.” The expression “jikan kasegi” is equivalent to English’s “buying time.”

か (ka): is our interrogative ending particle.

あの (ano): is an adjective, coming from the directional /ko/, /so/, /a/, /d/ group, meaning “that,” with the implication being that that “that” is not near the speaker of the addressee.

ガキたち (gaki-tachi): is a noun meaning “brat” with the suffi “tachi” which pluralizes nouns that refer to people.

が (ga): is our nominative particle, indicating the subject of the sentence.

この (kono): is the same as “ano” except with the /ko/ lexical stem, meaning “this.”

星 (hoshi): is a noun meaning “star,” or in this case “planet.” The planets are called stars, though the term for “planet” in general, not a specific one, is 惑星 (wakusei).

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

脱出 (dasshutsu): is a noun meaning “escape.”

する (suru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to do.” This

ため (tame): is a dependent noun, meaning that it’s grammatically a noun but has no substantial meaning if there is no IP modifying it. It means “advantage.”

の (no): is our genitive particle. “X tame no Y” is “a Y for (the benefit/advantage of) X” or “Y in order to Y” That X is “jikan kisegi”

Translation: “Buying time? Those brats, in order to escape this planet…”

孫悟空:時間稼ぎだと? そんな必要はない。きさまは死ぬこれからここで …
(Son Goku: Jikan kisegi da to? Sonna hitsuyou wa nai. Kisama wa shinu kore kara koko de…)

孫悟空 (Son Goku): is the protagonist of the Dragon Ball franchise. He normally just goes by Goku.

時間 (Jikan): is the same as last time.

稼ぎ (Kisegi): is the same as last time.

だ (da): is the affirmative, present conjugation of the copula “da.”

と (to): is a quotative particle. The verb being omitted here is “omou,” meaning “to think.”

そんな (sonna): is the directional lexical stem with the -nna suffix, meaning “this kind.” I believe a “koto,” meaning “thing” is omitted here.

必要 (hitsuyou): is a noun meaning “necessary.”

は (wa): is our topical particle.

ない (nai): is the negative, present conjugation of the copula “aru.” (Remember, Japanese has 3 copulae)

きさま (kisama): is a second person singular pronoun. It’s heard in a lot of boys action anime. It’s used for one’s opponent.

は (wa): is the same as before.

死ぬ (shinu): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to kore.” Remember that Japanese’s present tense can also indicate the future. That’s the case here.

これ (kore): is a pronoun meaning “this.”

から (kara): is a post-position, so like a preposition but after, and it means “after.” “kore kara” is often seen as an expression meaning “after this.”

ここ (koko): is another pronoun meaning “here.”

で  (de): is a post-position. (So those who were wondering about the one “de” that’s a case particle and the one that’s a post-position, this is the other one) It just indicates location, equivalent to “at.” We don’t translate it with a word in English sometime because it’d sound weird, as is the case here. Also, the phrase “koko de” has been displaced to the end of the sentence, but that doesn’t change its meaning.

Translation: “[You think] they’re buying time? That kind [of thing] is not necessary. You will die here after this.”

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ): < っくくくく …
(Furiiza (saishuu keitai furu-pawaa): kkukukuku)

くくくく (kukukuku): is the way evil laugher is written.

Translation: “Bwahahahaha…”

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ): でかいクチをきくのもそこまでだ !!!! いま すぐだまらせてやるぞ !!!!
(Furiiza (saishuu keitai furu-pawaa): Dekai kuchi wo kiku no mo soko made da!!! Ima-sugu damarasete yaru zo!!!)

でかい (dekai): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “huge.”

クチ (kuchi): is a noun meaning “mouth.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

きく (kiku): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to do work.”

の (no): is a substantivizing suffix, making that last phrase grammatically a noun.

も (mo): is a secondary particle meaning “too” or “even.”

そこ (soko): is like “koko,” but with a different stem. This means “there.”

まで (made): is a post-position meaning “up to.” “Soko made” is an expression meaning “to that extent.” It can sometimes mean something like “I’ve had it with ….”

だ (da): is the same as before.

いますぐ (ima-sugu): is an adverb meaning “immediately.”

だまらせて (damarasete): is the Te-form, or gerund, of a verb conjugated for the causative, affirmative, meaning “to be silent.” So, “to make silent.”

やる (yaru): is a noun conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to do.” The gerund and yaru is just a rougher way of saying the same thing.

ぞ (zo): is an exhortative ending suffix. It means that the speaker wants the sentence to happen. So translate it as an imperative.

Translation: “I’ve even had enough of your huge mouth talking! Make yourself quiet immediately!”

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ): このしつこいくたばりぞこないめ …..
(Furiiza (saishuu keitai furu-pawaa): Kono shitsukoi kutabarizokonai-me…)

この (kono): is the same as before.

しつこい (shitsukoi): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “obstinate.”

くたばりぞこないめ  (kutabarizokonai-me): is a noun that refers to a person who’s a piece of $#!T. It’s literally a person who, if they were to croak, it wouldn’t affect anyone. We’ll translate it as “worthless person.” “Me” is a suffix used for a person when you want to be derogatory. It’s not very common.

Translation: “This obstinate worthless person…”

フリーザ ( 最終形態 フル パワー ) :いいだろう !! こんどはこっぱみじんにしてやるあの地球人のように
(Furiiza (saishuu keitai furu-pawaa): Ii darou!! kondo wa koppamijin ni shite yaru ano chikyoujin no you-ni)

いい (ii): is an adjective conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “good.” “Ii,” “yoi,” and “yoroshii” all mean the same thing and the former comes from the latter.

だろう (darou): is an expression related to the copula “da.” It’s the rougher form of “deshou,” and means “it seems.” “Ii darou!” is equivalent to saying  “Enough!” in English.

こんど (kondo): is a noun meaning “now.” It might mean “soon” in other contexts, but it always means that it’s coming soon.

は (wa): is our topical particle.

こっぱみじん (koppamijin): is a noun meaning “broken into little pieces”

に (ni): is our adverbial suffix.

して (shite): is the Te-form of the verb “suru.”

やる (yaru): is the same as before. And we’re doing the exact same thing as before, too. It’d be good to note now that “yaru” also means “to kill” and that gives this an extra umph. We’ll be translating this as “to destroy” and we will also be translating this as future tense.

あの (ano): is the same as before.

地球人 (chikyoujin): is a noun meaning “Earthling,” which “chikyou” meaning “the earth” and “jin” meaning “person.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

ように (you-ni): is an expression. “X no you-ni Y” means to “ Y like X” adverbially. So the first time we need to know is that the Y here is everything in the sentence up to “yaru.” This is a displaced adverbial clause. The second thing is that “you” by itself means “shape” or “appearance” and “ni” is the adverbial suffix. So this is “in the appearance of.”

Translation: “Enough! Now I will destroy [you] into little pieces, like that Earthling.”

孫悟空: あの地球人のように ? …… クリリンのことか .
(Son Goku: Ano chikyoujin no you ni?… Kuririn no koto ka.)

あの (ano): is the same as before.

地球人 (chikyoujin): is the same as before.

の (no): is the same as before.

ように (you-ni): is the same as before.

クリリン (Kuririn): is a character who got destroyed to bits. In English they call him Krillin. He is Goku’s best friend. He eventually gets revived, marries an android whose name is a number.

の (no): is the genitive marker.

こと (koto): is a noun we mentioned before. It means “thing.” I brought this up in Lucky Star, but sometimes people are suffixed with “no koto,” the idea being, it seems, to emphasize them as who they are, so this wasn’t just a guy called Krillin, this was Krillin, like “the Krillin.”

か (ka): is the interrogative ending particle. Here I believe it’s being used rhetorically, as in this is a person whose name Frieza should know. (Though, to be fair, Frieza never learns anybody’s name.)

Translate: “Like that Earthling? You mean Krillin?”

Words Worth Memorizing

最終 (saishuu): final
形態 (keitai): form
時間稼ぎ (jikan kisegi): buying time
ガキ (gaki): brat
星 (hoshi): star; planet
脱出 (dasshutsu): escape
する (suru): to do
ため (tame): benefit, advantage
きさま (kisama): You (masculine, towards opponent)
死ぬ (shinu): to die
から (kara): after
でかい (dekai): huge
クチ (kuchi): mouth
きく (kiku): to do its job
まで (made): (up) to (post-position)
いますぐ (imasugu): immediately
だまる (tamaru): to be silent
やる (yaru): to do; to kill

しつこい (shitsukoi): obstinate
くたばりぞこない (kudabarizokonai): a piece of $#!T, a worthless person
いい (ii): good
だろう (darou): it seems (expression, rougher version of でしょう (deshou))
こんど (kondo): now
こっぱみじん (koppamijin): broken into little bits
地球 (chikyou): the Earth
人 (hito): person (Chinese reading – “jin”)

地球人 (chikyoujin): Earthling
こと (koto): thing

Okay, that’s it for this run! I hope you liked it. If you’d like me to do more Dragon Ball Xenoverse, please let me know! Also, sorry for the delay on this last part.

Dragon Ball: Xenoverse (Part 1.5)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

I forgot another window!

【DRAGON BALL XENOVERSEを購入された 皆様へ 】 「 DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE 」 のご購入 、誠にありがとうございます 。

本タイトルのプレイを始めるにあたり 「 DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE 利用規約 」に同意いただく必要がございます 。

 

利用規約はこちらからご確認いただけます。  http://dbs.bngames.net/terms.php

[同意する]  [同意しない]

DRAGON BALL XENOVERSEを購入された皆様へ 】 「 DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE」 のご購入 、誠にありがとうございます 。
([Dragon Ball Xenoverse wo kounyuu-sareta mina-sama he] “Dragon Ball Xenoverse” no go-kounyuu, makoto-ni arigatou gozaimasu.)

を (wo): is our accusative particle.

購入された (kounyuu-sareta): is the passive, affirmative, past conjugation of “kounyuu-suru.” “Kounyuu” is a noun meaning “purchase.” Here “sareta” is being used in a humbling expression. We know this because we’re using “wo” in this IP and in true passive sentences that isn’t the case. The idea is to show appreciation for the fact that purchasing this game means giving up one’s hard worked money.

皆様 (mina-sama): is the same as before.

へ (he): is our locative particle, which indicates here who we’re addressing. The person you’re talking to in a letter also takes “he” at the beginning.

の (no): is the genitive particle.

ご購入 (go-kounyuu): is the same as before except with the honorific suffix.

誠に (makoto-ni): is an expression meaning “truly,” and comes from “makoto,” meaning “truth” and the adverbial suffix “ni.”

ありがとうございます (arigatou-gozaimasu): is an expression meaning “thank you.” We talked about its history before here.

Translation: “To everybody who purchased ‘Dragon Ball Xenoverse,’ For your purchase of ‘Dragon Ball Xenoverse,’ truly, thank you.”

本タイトルのプレイを始めるにあたり 「 DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE 利用規約 」に同意いただく必要がございます 。
(Hon-taitoru no purei wo hajimeru ni atari “Dragon Ball Xenoverse riyou kiyaku” ni doui-itadaku hitsuyou ga gozaimasu.)

本タイトル (hon-taitoru): is a compound word which seems to refer to the game itself. “Hon” is a noun that means “book” or “volume” and “taitoru” is a loanword noun meaning “title.” We’ll be translating it as “this title.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

プレイ (purei): is a loanword noun meaning “play.”

を (wo): is the accusative particle.

始める (hajimeru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to begin.

にあたり (ni atari): is an expression. “Ni” is the dative particle. “Atari” is the verbal stem of “ataru,” which means “to hit.” The expression “V ni atari” means “upon V”

利用 (riyou): is a noun meaning “use.”

規約 (kiyaku): is a noun meaning “agreement.”

に (ni): is the dative particle.

同意 (doui): is a noun meaning “agreement” or “consent.”

いただく (itadaku): is a humble verb meaning “to receive,” conjugated for the affirmative, present.

必要 (hitsuyou): is a noun meaning “necessary.”

が (ga): is our nominative particle.

ございます (gozaimasu): is an archaic copula conjugated for the affirmative, present, which now is use almost exclusively for politeness.

Translation: It is necessary that we receive [your] consent to the “Dragon Ball Xenoverse use ageement” upon starting to play this title.”

利用規約はこちらからご確認いただけます。
(Riyou kiyaku wa kochira kara go-kakunin itadakemasu.)

利用 (riyou): is the same as before.

規約 (kiyaku): is the same as before.

は (wa): is the topical particle.

こちら (kochira): is a polite noun meaning “this one.”

から (kara): is a conjugation, here meaning “because.”

ご確認 (go-kakunin): is the honorific prefix plus the noun “kakunin,” meaning “confirmation.”

いただけます (itadakemasu): is the polite, potential, affirmative, present conjugation of “itadaku.”

What it seems to be saying that because we’re giving you a link to the full agreement, we can receive the confirmation, i.e. we’re giving you the option to read the entire thing and not just putting our hand over the dotted line. Thus, go read it!

Translation: “As to the use agreement, because of this [link] we can receive your confirmation.”

I will not be translating the use agreement.

[同意する]  [同意しない]

I consent         I do not consent

Words Worth Memorizing

購入 (kounyuu): purchase
同意 (doui): consent, agree
利用 (riyou): use
規約 (kiyoku): agreement
いただく (itadaku): to receive (humble)
始める (hajimeru): to start something
こちら (kochira): this one

Dragon Ball: Xenoverse (Part 1)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

I wanted to do a video game as an experiment, trying to find out how long it takes me to transcribe something and play through things. So this is what has come from that initial attempt. I won’t be doing anything regarding video games for the next few weeks because I want to finish Lucky Star and we’re halfway there.

So, you put in the game disc and when the game starts you see a couple of things before actually getting to play the game. Let’s look at that first.

ご注意: ゲームソフトを権利者の許諾 なくインターネットを通じて配信配布する行為 、また 、違法なインターネット配信と知りながらダウンロードする行為は法律で 固く禁じられております 。 みなさまのご理解と ご協力をお願いいたします 。

このゲームはオートセーブ機能に対応しています 。[Icon] が表示されて いるときは本体の電源 を 切らないでください 。

「DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE 」 の セーブ データ が 見つかりませ んでした。 新規にセーブ データを作成してもよろしいですか? [はい] [いいえ]

(The first thing is an announcement)

ご注意: ゲーム ソフトを権利者の許諾なくインターネットを通じて配信配布 する 行為 、また 、違法なインターネット配信と知りながらダウンロードする 行為は法律で固く禁じられております。みなさまのご理解とご協力を お願いいたします 。
(Go-chuui: geemu sofuto wo kenri-sha no kyodaku naku intaanetto wo tsuujite haishin haiku suru koui, mata, ihou-na intaanetto haishin to shiri-nagara daunroodo suru koui wa houritsu de kataku kinjirarete-orimasu. Mina-sama no go-rikai to go-kyouryoku wo onegai-itashimasu)

ご注意 (go-chuui): is a noun meaning “warning.” It has the honorific prefix “go” at the beginning, but the meaning remains basically the same.

ゲーム (geemu): is a noun meaning “game.”

ソフト (sofuto): is a noun meaning “software.”

を (wo): is our accusative particle, marking the direct object. I believe this “wo” goes with “haifu,” which is further down the line.

権利者 (kenri-sha): is a noun meaning “rights holder.” “Kenri” means “right” and “sha” is a suffix meaning “person.”

の (no): is our genitive particle, meaning than in “X no Y” Y belongs to X.

許諾 (kyodaku): is a noun meaning “permission.”

なく (naku): is a literary truncation of the negative, Te-form conjugation of the copula “aru,” meaning “to be” or sometimes translated as “to have.” Normally it is “nakute,” but the “te” drops out. Either way, it functions the same by joining this IP to the rest of the sentence. [Option 1, which I’m not crazy about for now.]

Or, alternatively, we should interpret this as the adverbial form of the verb and make everything from Kenrish-sha to naku an adverbial phrase. I’m going to go with this. [Option 2, which I like better.]

So far: “Warning: Not having permission from the right holders, this game…

インターネット (Intaanetto): is a noun meaning “internet.”

を (wo): is our accusative marker.

通じて (tsuushite): is an adverb (albeit an adverb that comes from a Te-form) meaning “through.”

配信 (haishin): is a noun meaning “transmission.”

配布 (haifu): is a noun meaning “distribution.” Both words seem to mean basically the same thing, but the first one appears to have a more general meaning of getting things from one place to another.

する (suru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to do.” This works with the two previous nouns to make them verbs.

行為 (koui): is a noun meaning “an act.”

So far: “Warning: Not having permission from the right holders, the act of transmitting and distributing the game software through the internet…”

また (mata): is an adverb that gives continuity to things. It’s translated often as “again” or “also.”

違法な (ihou-na): is a noun meaning “illegal” with the adjectival verb suffix “na.”

インターネット (intaanetto): is the same as before.

配信 (haishin): is the same as before.

と (to): is working as part of an expression: “X to shirinagara Y” which means “to knowingly Y X.” What the construction seems to imply is that “while one knows X, one does why.” So this is a quotative particle, even if it looks confusing.

知りながら (shiri-nagara): is the verbal stem, or participle of the verb “shiru,” meaning “to know,” and the suffix “nagara,” which means “while.”

ダウンロード (daunroodo): is a noun meaning “download.”

する (suru): is the same as before, now acting with “daunroodo,”

行為 (koui): is the same as before.

So far: “Warning: Not having the permission from the right holders, the act of transmitting and distributing the game software through the Internet, also, the act of knowingly downloading an illegal internet distribution”

は (wa): is our topical particle, indicating not the subject, the topic of a sentence.

法律 (houritsu): is a noun meaning “the law.”

で (de): is our instrumental particle, indicating a cause. We’ll be translating this as “by.”

固く (hataku): is an adverb meaning “strongly” or in this case “strictly.”

禁じられております: is a polite and humble configuration of what would otherwise just be “kinjiru,” meaning “to prohibit.” The humble configuration normally means that you take the Te-form of the verb you’re want to use and attach it to “oru.” And if it’s the main verb in sentence, then the “oru” be conjugated for politeness. That means that you take the verbal stem and attach the -masu suffix. Here our verb “kinjiru,” is conjugated for the passive, affirmative, Te-form, meaning our translated should be passive “to be prohibited.”

So far: “Warning: Not having the permission from the right holders, the act of transmitting and distributing the game software through the Internet, also, the act of knowingly downloading an illegal internet distribution is strictly prohibited by law.”

みなさま (mina-sama): is the pronoun “minna,” meaning “everybody” and the honorific suffix “sama.”

の (no): is our genitive suffix.

ご理解 (go-rikai): is the noun “rikai” meaning “understanding” and “comprehension” and is where the name for the Rikai plug-ins comes from. And it has the honorific prefix “go.”

と (to): is our conjunction for two Noun Phrases.

ご協力 (go-kyouryoku): is a noun meaning “cooperation” with the same honorific prefix.

を (wo): is our direct object marker.

お願いいたします (o-negai-itashimasu): is a polite configuration of the popular phrase “o-neigai-shimasu,” which itself is the verb “suru,” conjugated for the polite, affirmative, present plus the noun “onegai,” meaning “request,” and the honorific prefix “o,” which is a counterpart to “go.” The phrase is a way of saying “please” or “[I] am requesting X” if you want to be a tad more literal. “Itasu,” is the verb used in “humble language” in lieu of “suru.”

Someone remind me to make a post about polite, honorific, and humble language one of these days. Also, remind me to not rant about it.

Okay, so let’s get this official translation looking a bit more normal, shall we?

Translation: Warning: The act of transmitting and distributing the game software through the Internet without the permission from the right holders and the act of knowingly downloading an illegal internet distribution is strictly prohibited by law. We [humbly] ask for everybody’s understanding and cooperation.”

The second notification one gets is from the game itself, not one of these general warnings. The [Icon] is a little icon that appears at the bottom right when the game is autosaving.

この ゲーム はオートセーブ機能に対応しています 。 [Icon]が表示されているときは本体の電源を切らないでください 。
(Kono geemu wa ooto-seebu kinou ni taihou shite-imasu. [Icon] ga hyouji sarete iru toki wa hontai no dengen wo kiranai de kudasai.)

この (kono): is an adjective (it’s a lexical stem with a “no” attached, but we’ll let it slide) meaning “this.”

ゲーム (geemu): is the same as before.

は (wa): is our topical particle.

オートセーブ (ooto-seebu): is a loanword/phrase meaning “auto save.” It’s working adjectivally with the following word.

機能 (kinou): is a noun meaning “function”

に (ni): is our dative particle, indicating the object of the verb here.

対応 (taiou): is a noun meaning “support” or “correspondence.”

しています  (shite-imasu): is the polite, affirmative, present progressive conjugation of “suru.” One gets the present progressive by taking the Te-form of “suru” and adding “iru” to it. Then to make it polite one adds -masu to the stem of “iru.” “Taiou suru” means “to correspond.” I suspect that this verb may be Japanese’s equivalent to English’s “to support,” like a game supports a certain feature.

So far: “This game supports an auto save function.” 

が (ga): is our nominative particle, meaning the [Icon] is the subject of the sentence.

表示 (hyouji): is a noun meaning “indication” or “display.”

されている (sarete-iru): is the passive, affirmative, present progressive of “suru.” The passive conjugation of “suru” is “sareru.” “Suru” is a verb that conjugates irregularly. We’ll be translating this passively, “to be indicated.”

とき (toki): is a noun meaning “time.”

は (wa): is our topic particle.

本体 (hondai): is a noun meaning “body.” It may be a shortening of a larger phrase, but what it’s referring to is the console unit.

の (no): is our genitive marker.

電源 (dengen): is a noun meaning “electric source,” i.e. the power.

を (wo): is our accusative particle.

切らない (kiranai): is the negative, present conjugation of the verb “kiru,” meaning “to cut” or metaphorically “to turn off.”

で (de): is the instrumental particle. This is an expression, really, and it’s one that’s so old that it’s hard sometimes to see what’s going on syntactically.

ください (kudasai): is an expression that makes requests. It comes from the humble verb “kudasaru,” which often means “to give.” And it seems to be a contraction of what would be the imperative *”kudasaranasai.” “Vnai de kudasai” means “Please do not V.”

Translation: “This game supports an auto save function. When this [Icon] is being displayed, please do not turn off the console’s power.”

This third notification appears from the Playstation itself when you’re playing the game for the first time; and you need to give the game an answer.

「DRAGON BALL XENOVERSE 」のセーブデータが見つかりませんでした。新規にセーブデータを作成してもよろしいですか? [はい] [いいえ]
(”Dragon Ball Xenoverse” no seebu-deeta ga tsukarimasen-deshita. Shinki ni seebu deeta wo sakusei shite mo yoroshii desu ga? [Hai] [Iie])

の (no): is the genitive particle.

セーブデータ (seebu-deeta): is a loan phrase meaning “save data.”

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

見つかりませんでした (mitsukarimasen-deshita): is the polite, negative, past conjugation of the verb “mitsukaru,” meaning “to be found.” The polite, negative, past is like its present counterpart except that the temporal suffix -u is replaced with -en (which is a historical thing and I believe it’s underground form starts with some aspirant) and the polite, affimative, past conjugation of the copula “da,” “deshita.”

新規 (shinki): is a noun meaning “new.”

に (ni): is the adverbial suffix. So this is “newly,” though it’s sometimes translated as “new” because otherwise it’d sound weird in English. Just know that this is a new thing in general.

セーブデータ (seebu-deeta): is the same as before.

を (wo): is our accusative particle.

作成 (sakusei): is a noun meaning “making.”

して (shite): is the Te-form of “suru.” This is part of an expression.

も (mo): is a secondary particle meaning “too” or “even.” And this is just part of the expression.

よろしい (yoroshii): is an adjective (which really isn’t an adjective) conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “good.” And this is a very nice way of saying “good.” The expression is “Vte mo ii?,” which means “May I V?” To my understanding the idea is that “Is even doing also good?” means that everything one does is done because it pleases the person in charge and this one thing is just one more of those many things.

です (desu): is the polite, affirmative, present conjugation fo the verb “da.”

か (ka): is the interrogative ending particle.

はい (hai): is an interjection meaning “yes.”

いいえ (iie): is an interjection meaning “no.”

Translation: “[We] did not find “Dragon Ball Xenoverse” save data. May we make new save data? [Yes] [No]”

Words Worth Memorizing

ご注意 (go-chuui): warning
ゲーム (geemu): game
権利者 (kenri-sha): rights holder
許諾  (kyodaku): consent
インターネット (intaanetto): internet
通じて (tsuujite): through
配信 (haishin): distribution, transmission
配布 (haifu): distribution
する (suru): to do
行為 (koui): act, deed
また (mata): also, and, still
違法 (ihou): illegal
知る (shiru): to know
法律  (houritsu): law
固い (katai): hard, firm
禁じる (kinjiru): to prohibit
みな (mina): everybody
理解 (rikai): understanding, comprehension
協力 (kyouryoku): cooperation
願い (negai): request; desire, wish
いたす (itasu): to do (humble)
表示 (hyouji): indication, display
いる (iru): copula, used in progressive aspect conjugations
とき (toki): time
電源 (dengen): power source
切る (kiru): to cut; to cut off (power) to turn off
見つかる (tsukaru): to be found
新規 (shinki): new
作成 (sakusei): making
よろしい (yoroshii): new

“Cha-La Head-Cha-La” (Dragon Ball Z Theme) & Dragon Ball: Xenoverse (Part 2)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

I felt so bad for telling you guys about social media stuff that I wanted to make up for it with something we’re going to need for our next little project, which is Dragon Ball Xenoverse. The game’s theme song is Flow’s rendition of “Cha-La Head Cha-La.” Here are the lyrics and the complete parsing. Enjoy!

光る雲を突き抜けFly Away (Fly Away)
からだじゅうに広がるパノラマ
頭を蹴られた地球が怒って (怒って)
火山を爆発させる

溶けた北极の中に
恐竜がいたら玉り仕込みたいね

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
何が起きても気分はヘのヘのカッパ
CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
胸がパチパチするほど
騒ぐ元気玉…Sparking!

空を急降下 Jet Coaster (Coaster)
落ちてゆくよパニックの楽园へ
景色 逆さになると愉快さ (愉快さ)
山さえ お尻に見える

悩む時間はないよ
何処かに潜む「ビックリ!」 に逢いたいから

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
頭カラッポの方が夢詰め込める
CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
笑顔ウルトラゼットで
今日もアイヤイヤイヤイヤイ

So, without further ado…

光る雲を突き抜けFly Away (Fly Away)
(HIkaru kumo wo tsukinuke Fly Away (Fly Away))

光る (hikaru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to shine.” This Verb Phrase (which will automatically be an Inflexional Phrase) is in the attributive position, i.e. preceding a Noun Phrase.

雲 (kumo): is a noun meaning “cloud.” So this is the “clouds that shine.”

を (wo): is our accusative marker. The accusative marker is that which indicates that the preceding Noun Phrase is the direct object of the verb.

突き抜け (tsukinuke): is the imperative of the verb “tsukinuku,” which means “to penetrate” or “to pierce through.”

からだじゅうに広がるパノラマ
(Karada-juu-ni hirogaru panorama)

からだじゅうに (Karada-juu-ni): is an adverb made up of “karada,” a noun meaning body, “juu,” a suffix meaning “inside,” and the adverbial suffix “ni.” Thus the adverb meaning “inside my body” or “throughout the body.”

広がる (hirogaru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to spread out.”

パノラマ (panorama): is a loanword noun meaning “panorama.”

頭を蹴られた地球が怒って (怒って)
(Atama wo kerareta chikyuu ga okotte (okotte))

頭 (atama): is a noun meaning “head.”

を (wo): is the same as before.

蹴られた (kerareta): is the passive, affirmative, past conjugation of the verb “keru,” meaning “to kick.” In a passive voice sentence, you’d expect the thing affected by the verb to be in the nominative case, but not here. Why? Because this is something interesting about Japanese, where the only thing that changes in an otherwise active voiced sentence is the verb. This is sometimes called the “suffering passive,” which is a kind of expression that just states that the events in this sentence are inconvenient.

地球 (chikyuu): is a noun meaning “the earth.”

が (ga): is our nominative marker, indicating the subject of the sentence.

怒って (okotte): is the Te-form, or gerund (so to speak), of the verb “okoru,” meaning “to get angry.” The Te-form allows us to link verbs in sequence.

火山を爆発させる
(Kazan wo bakuhatsu sareru)

火山 (kazan): is a noun meaning “volcano.” It literally means “fire mountain.”

を (wo): is the same as always.

爆発 (bakuhatsu): is a noun meaning “explosion.” This is one of those nouns that works in conjunction with “suru” to become a verb.

させる (saseru): is the causative, affirmative, present of “suru.” The causative mood indicates that one thing is made to happen.

Translation:
“I piece through the shining clouds “Fly Away”
A panorama spreads out through my body
The earth, kicked in the face, gets angry
And a volcano is made to explode”

溶けた北極の中に
(Toketa hokkyoku no naka ni)

溶けた (toketa): a verb conjugated for the affirmative, past meaning “to melt.”

北極 (hokkyoku): in a noun meaning “the North Pole.”

の (no): is our genitive particle. “X no Y” translates to “Y of X.”

中 (naka): is the Japanese-reading counterpart of the “juu” we saw a moment ago. It means “in the middle” or “within” or “inside.”

に (ni): is our dative particle, indicating location.

恐竜がいたら玉乗り仕込みたいね
(Kyouryou ga itara tamanori shikomitai ne)

恐竜 (kyouryou): is a noun meaning “dinosaur.” It literally translates to “scary dragon.”

が (ga): is our nominative particle.

いたら (itara): is the conditional, affirmative conjugation of “iru,” one of Japanese’s three copula.

玉乗り (tamanori): is a noun meaning “balancing on a ball.” It comes from “tama,” meaning “ball,” and “nori,” the participle of “noru,” meaning “to ride.”

仕込みたい (shikomitai): is the desiderative, affirmative conjugation of “shikomu,” meaning “to train.”

ね (ne): is the dubitative/softening ending particle. The desiderative in Japanese is very strong. It’s often warranted to add a “ne” at the end, or to use the gerund of the verb and conjugate “miru” to the desiderative.

Translation:
“Within the melted North Pole,
If there is a dragon, I want to train it to balance on a ball.”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Means as much in English as it does in Japanese

何が起きても気分はヘのヘのカッパ
(Nani ga okite mo kibun wa he no he no kappa)

何 (nani): is an interrogative pronoun meaning “what?”

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

起きて (okite): is the gerund of “okiru,” meaning “to get up” or “to occur.”

も (mo): is a secondary particle meaning “even” and “too.” This is an expression. I don’t believe this sentence makes grammatical sense. “Nani ga Xte mmo” means “No matter what X.”

気分 (kibun): is a noun meaning “mood” or “feeling.”

は (wa): is our topical particle. This is not the subject, but the topic, which is something that exists syntactically outside of the basic structure of an IP.

(ヘの)ヘのカッパ (he no kappa): is an expression. I have no idea why it means what it means, but it means “easy to do.”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Is the same verse as before.

胸がパチパチするほど
(Mune ga pachi-pachi suru hodo)

胸 (mune): is a noun meaning “chest.”

が (ga): is our nominative particle.

パチパチ (pachi-pachi): is an onomatopoetic adverb referring to something popping open or clapping along. This is one’s heard thumping.

する (suru): is the affirmative, present conjugation of our verb meaning “to do.” It’s working in conjunction with “pachi-pachi,” meaning “to pachi-pachi.”

ほど (hodo): is a tricky word meaning “extent.” It’s a sort of noun with an adverbial meaning. What exactly “hodo” is communicating depends on context. Here I’ll tell you that “hodo” is comparing two things. So S1 is happening to the same extent as S2 is happening.

騒ぐ元気玉…Sparking!
(Sawagu genki-dama… Sparkling!)

騒ぐ (sawagu): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to make a sound.” I wish there were a good way of translating this without making it sound dumb.

元気玉 (genki-dama): is an attack used by Goku, it’s the “spirit bomb” in English. In Japanese, it means the “energy (or “spirit”) ball.”
Translation:
“Cha-la Head-Cha-la
No matter what occurs, the feeling is no big deal
Cha-la Head-Cha-la
To the extend that my chest is beating
The Spirit Bomb sounds… Sparking!“

空を急降下 Jet Coaster (Coaster)
(Sora wo kyuukouka Jet Coaster (Coaster))

空 (sora): is a noun meaning “sky.” If you know Sora from Kingdom Hearts, this is where he gets his name from.

を (wo): is the same as always.

急降下 (kyuukouka): is a noun meaning “nose dive” or “swoop”

落ちてゆくよパニックの楽園へ
(Ochite yuku yo paniku no rakuen he)

落ちて (ochite): is the Te-form of “ochiru,” meaning “to fall.” This Te-form will indicate a series of actions.

ゆく (yuku): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to proceed” or “to go.” My understanding is that it’s a poetic word.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

パニック (paniku): is a loanword noun meaning “panic.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

楽園 (rakuen): is a noun meaning “paradise.”

へ (he): is our locative particle. It only indicates location. It’s good to note that the particle “he” tends to be pronounced “e.” This last noun phrase is displaced and should go before the “yo” in your translation.

景色 逆さになると愉快さ (愉快さ)
(Keshiki sakasa ni naru to yukai-sa)

景色 (keshiki): is a noun meaning “scenery.” There is an omitted “wa” here.

逆さ (sakasa): Is a noun meaning “the reverse” or “upside down.”

に (ni): is the dative particle working with “naru.”

なる (naru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to become.”

と (to): is a conditional conjunction. A very strong conditional is established with “to.” If the antecedent is true, then the consequent will definitively happen.

愉快 (yukai): is a noun meaning “pleasantness” or “happiness.”

さ (sa): is an emphatic ending particle.

山さえお尻に見える
(Yama-sae o-shiri ni mieru)

山さえ (yama-sae): is the noun “yama,” meaning “mountain,” and the suffix “-sae” which indicates that the subject is something unexpected, often translated to “even.”

お尻 (o-shiri): is the noun “shiri,” meaning “butt,” with the honorable suffix “o.”

に (ni): is the dative particle, which the verb “mieru” uses.

見える (mieru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to be seen” or “to look like.”

Translation:
“A jet coaster that swoops through the sky
it falls and goes a paradise of panic
When the scenery is turned upside down there is happiness!
Even the mountains look like butts!”

悩む時間はないよ
(Nayamu jikan wa nai yo)

悩む (nayamu): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to be worried.”

時間 (jikan): is a noun meaning “a period of time” but can just be translated as “a time.”

は (wa): is our topical particle.

ない (nai): is a verb conjugated for the negative, present, of the copula “aru.”

よ (yo): is the same as before.


何処かに潜む「ビックリ!」 に逢いたいから

何処か (dokoka): is an indefinite pronoun meaning “somewhere” or “anywhere.”

に (ni): is our dative particle.

潜む (hisomu): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to lurk” or “to be hidden.”

ビックリ (bikkuri): is a noun meaning “surprise.” Fun fact: in Japanese a jack-in-the-box is called is “bikkuri bago,” a “surprise box.”

に (ni): is the dative particle working with this conjugation of “au.”

逢いたい (aitai): is the desiderative, affirmative conjugation of “au,” meaning “to meet.”

から (kara): is a conjugation meaning “because.”

Translation:
“There is no time to be worried!
Because I want to meet the ‘surprise’ hidden somewhere!”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Same as always.

頭カラッポの方が夢詰め込める
(Atama karappo no hou ga yume tsumekomeru)

頭 (atama): is the same as before.

カラッポ (karappo): is a noun meaning “empty.”

の方が (no-hou-ga): is an expression. It’s a way of describing preference. “No” is the genitive particle. “Hou” is a noun meaning “way” or “direction.” And “ga” is the nominative particle. It’s a way of saying that this way is the definitive way. (It works often with “yori.”) So one would rather an “atama karappo”

夢 (yume): is a noun meaning “dream.”

詰め込める (tsumekomeru): is a verb conjugated for the potential, affirmative, present, from “tsumekomu,” meaning “to stuff” or “to jam.”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Same as always.

笑顔ウルトラゼットで
(Egao urutora zetto de)

笑顔 (egao): is a noun meaning “smiling face.”

ウルトラ (urutora): is a loanword noun meaning “ultra.”

ゼット (zetto): is another loanword noun meaning the letter “Z,” which in many placed is pronounced “zed.”

で (de): is the Te-form of the copula “da.”


今日もアイヤイヤイヤイヤイ

今日 (ima): is a noun meaning “today” or “now.”

も (mo): is a seconary particle meaning “too” or “even.”

アイヤイヤイヤイヤイ (ai-yai-yai-yai-yai): is gibberish.

Translation:
“Cha-La Head-Cha-La
I prefer an empty head to cram with dreams
Cha-La Head-Cha-La
My smiling face being ultra Z
Even now I am ‘ai-yai-yai-yai-yai’”

And we’re done! When we do DBX tomorrow, I’ll be referring you all to this post as a Part 2. And please check out our Facebook page while you’re here!

“Dan Dan Kokoro Hikareteku” (Dragon Ball GT Theme)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

I am back with something I haven’t done in about a year: parse anime opening lyrics. Here we have the iconic opening from Dragon Ball GT, which is probably the only worthwhile thing to come from the show.

[I’m making 3 edits, which you will see in brackets [] and italics and the original with a strikethrough A special thanks to @grapefruitcake for always pointing things out and keeping me on my toes in these matters.]

This is going to be an entire parsing in one go.


DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
その眩しい笑顏に
果てない暗闇 から 飛び出そう  Hold my hand

君と出合った時
子供のころ大切に想っていた景色 を思い出したんだ
僕と踊ってくれないか
光と彩 のWinding Road, 今でもあいつに 夢中なの?
少しだけ 振り向きたくなるような時もあるけど
愛と勇氣と誇りを 持って戦うよ

DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
この宇宙の希望のかけら
きっと誰もが永遠を手に人れたい
ZEN ZEN 気にしないフリしても
ほら君に戀してる
果てない暗闇から飛びだそう  Hold your hand

怒った顏も疲れてる君も好きだげど
あんなに飛ばして生きて大丈夫かなと思う
僕は…何気ないしぐさに踏み回されてる
Sea Side Blue
それでもあいつに夢中なの?
もっと聞きたいことかあったのに
二人の会話か車の音にはばまれて通りに舞うよ

DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
自分でも不思議なんだけど
何かあるとすぐに君に電話したくなる
ZEN ZEN 気のないフリしても
結局君のことだけ見ていた
海の彼方へ飛ぴ出そうよ Hold my hand

The first order of business is to get everything into Romaji. I promise that it’s all transliterated into the same format of verses and stanzas as I have above.

1.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
Sono mabushii eigao [egao] ni
Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold my hand”

2.
Kimi to deatta toki
Kodomo no koro taisetsu ni motteita basho wo omoidashitanda
Boku to odotte kurenai ka
hikari to kage no “winding road”, ima demo aitsu ni muchuu nano
Sukoshi dake furimukitakunaru youna toki mo aru kedo
Ai to yuuki to hokori wo motte tatakau yo

3.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
kono uchuu no kibou no kakera
Kitto daremo ga eien wo te ni iretai
Zen Zen ki ni shinai furi shitemo
Hora kimi ni koi shiteru
Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold your hand”

4.
Okotta kao mo tsukareteru kimi mo suki da kedo
Anna ni tobashiteikite daijoubu ka na to omou
Boku wa nanigenai shigusa ni furimawasareteru
”Sea Side Blue”
Sore demo aitsu ni muchuu nano
motto kikitai koto ga atta no ni
Futari no kaiwa ga kuruma no noto ni habamarete toori ni mau yo

5.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
Jibundemo fushigi nanda kedo
Nanika aru to ichisugu ni kimi ni denwa shitakunaru
Zen Zen ki no nai furi shitemo
Kekkyoku kimi no koto dake miteita
Umi no kanata he tobidasou yo “Hold my hand”

1.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

Dan Dan is an onomatopoeia meaning “slowly.”

Kokoro is a noun meaning “heart” in the metaphorical sense, so not the organ.

Hikareteku is a contraction of “hikarete iku.” “Hikarete” is the Te-form, henceforth called the participle form, of “hikareru,” which means “to be charmed.” “Iku” is a verb meaning “to go.” What it is doing here is functioning similarly to “Iru” in the “te iru” construction, i.e. the periphrastic present progressive. The agent of this verb takes the Ni particle.

Sono mabushii eigao [egao] ni (By that radiant smile)

Sono is an adjective (adjective! gasp!) meaning “that.”

Mabushii is a so-called i-adjective, which is actually a verb, conjugated for the present, meaning “radiant.” It modifies the next word.

Eigao is a noun meaning “smile.”

Ni is an ablative particle. Here it functions as an “ablative of agent.”

Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold my hand” (Let us jump out of this darkness that does not end. Hold my hand.)

Hatenai is the present, negative conjugation of the verb “hateru,” which means “to end.” Because it precedes a noun, it means that this verb, the sole constituent of this inflexional phrase, it modifies the noun.

Kurayami is a noun meaning “darkness.” So this is the “darkness that does not end.”

Kara is a post-position that means movement away from. It’s usually translated as “from,” but because of the main verb in this phrase, it’d be prudent to use a stronger translation. I’ve chosen “out of.”

Tobidasou is a conjunction of two verbs: “Tobi” and “Dasu.” “Tobi” means “to leap” or “to fly.” “Dasu” is a verb meaning “to take out” or “to bring something out.” Together they mean “to jump out.”

2.

Kimi to deatta toki (When I met you)

Kimi is a 2nd person singular pronoun. It’s not a formal pronoun and tends to refer to males. The context of this song leads me to believe that it’s in this case referring to a woman.

to is a post-position. It tends to be translated as “with,” but its function is to state that the noun accompanies something else in an operation, an operation described with the verb.

Deatta is a verb conjugated for the past, affirmative meaning “to meet by chance” (describing meeting someone unexpectedly for the first time.) These three words make up an inflexional phrase. Since it precedes a noun, it modifies the noun.

Toki is a noun meaning “time.” When it has an IP modifying it, it tends to be translated as “When [IP].”

Kodomo no koro taisetsu ni motteita basho wo omoidashita n da (It is that I remember a place that I held fondly (dear) when I was a child.)

Komodo is a noun meaning “child”

no is a genitive particle. “X no Y” tends to be translated, thus, as “Y of X.”

Koro is a noun meaning “time.” It takes the genitive to describe the time exact period, so in this case it’s the “time as a child”

Taisetsu is a noun meaning “important” or “fond.” In English it has an adjectival meaning but it is grammatically a noun in English.

ni is a suffix that makes the noun an adverb.

Motteita is a past progressive verb in the style of “hikareteku” in that the main verb is “iku.” “Motte” is the participial form of “motsu,” which means “to hold.”

Basho is a noun meaning “place.”

wo is an accusative particle. So this is the object of the next verb.

Omoidashita is a verb conjugated in the affirmative perfect (past) meaning “to remember.”

n is functionally a noun (I believe) but it carries no meaning in itself. All it does is allow us to use an IP as a noun. Here you’ll see me use the “It is” translation just to give it some representation.

Da is our copula, conjugated for the present, affirmative.

Boku to odotte kurenai ka (Will you dance with [me]?)

Boku is a first person singular pronoun, tends to denote masculinity.

to is the same “to” we saw before.

Odotte is the participial form of the verb “Odoru,” which means “to dance.” It’s in the participial form because it works alongside the next verb.

Kurenai is a verb conjugated in the negative, present meaning “to give.” When it is paired with the participial form of a verb, it means “to give (the speaker) X,” i.e. to do something for the speaker’s benefit. It’s in the negative conjugation because in an interrogative sentence, the negative can be an invitation.

ka is an interrogative particle. So this is the speaker asking to something.

Hikari to kage no WINDING ROAD, ima demo aitsu ni muchuu nano (On the winding road of light and shadow, even now [does there exist] a daze [in you] by that person]?)

Hikari is a noun meaning “light.”

to is the same as before.

Kage is a noun meaning “shadow.”

no is the same as before.

“Winding road” is English.

Imademo is an adverb meaning “even now.” It’s made up of the adverb “ima,” meaning “now,” and the conjunction “demo,” meaning “but.”

Aitsu is a 3rd person singular pronoun meaning “that person.”

ni is the same marker as before with basically the same function of agency. The difference here is that there is no verb.

Muchuu is a noun meaning “daze.”

Nano is a sentence ending that is a casual feminine version of “da ka.” So it’s a copula and an interrogative ending particle.

(Because there is no verb, we are going to write a faithful translation that’s clunky as all hell. What you’d want to do for a smoother translation is to make “muchuu” a verb.)

Sukoshi dake furimukitakunaru youna toki mo aru kedo (Despite there even being just a few times when I want to start to turn [start to want to turn] around)

Sukoshi is an adverb meaning “a little bit”

Dake is a restrictive noun suffix meaning “only”

Furimukitakunaru is a lot of things at once. We’ll look at things one by one. We’re looking at a conjunction of verbs that ends in “naru.” “Xnaru” tends to mean “to become” or “to start Xing.” “Taku” is the adverbial form of the “tai” conjugation of verbs. “Tai” is the desiderative mood, meaning it expresses desire. So “takunaru” is about “starting to want to” do something. Now we just have to deal with the meat and potatoes: “furimuki,” which is the stem of the verb “furimuku,” which means “to turn around.” So the whole thing means “to want to start to turn around.”

Youna is a na-adjective (but actually a verb) meaning “similar to.” It doesn’t have any meaning in itself, but connects an IP and a Noun, where the noun is “like” the IP.

Toki is the same as before. But “youna” is going to require us to translate it as “time” and not as “when.” We’ll say it is a “time like I wanted to turn around.”

Mo is a post-position that gets translated as “even.” It can be called a “supplemental” marker as well since it designates that the noun is not the only thing that can be the object of the verb.

aru is a copula. It and “iru” get translated often as “there is”

kedo is a conjugation that translates to “despite.”

Ai to yuuki to hokori wo motte tatakau yo (I hold onto love and courage and pride and fight!)

Ai is a noun meaning “love.”

to is the same as before

Yuuki is a noun meaning “courage.”

to is the same as before.

Hokori is a noun meaning “pride.”

wo is the same as before.

Motte is the participial form of “motsu,” meaning “to hold.” Using the pariticipial form before a definite verb is a way of conjoining those two verbs. So you do them both at the same time or in immediate succession.

Tatakau is a present, affirmative verb meaning “to fight.”

yo is an emphatic ending particle.

3.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

kono uchuu no kibou no kakera (The fragments of the hope of this universe)

Kono is an an adjective meaning “this”

Uchuu is a noun meaning “the universe”

no is the same as before.

Kibou is a noun meaning “hope.”

no is the same as before.

Kakera is a noun meaning “fragments”

Kitto daremo ga eien wo te ni iretai (Surely everybody wants to obtain eternity.)

Kitto is an adverb meaning “surely.”

daremo is a 3rd person plural pronoun meaning “everybody.”

ga is a nominative particle, meaning that it indicates the subject of the sentence.

Eien is a noun meaning “eternity.”

wo is the same as before.

Te is a noun meaning “hand.”

ni is the same as before.

iretai is the desiderative mood, present affirmative of the verb “ireru,” meaning “to put in.” The expression “te ni ireru” means “to obtain.” So we’ll translate it as such and not as “to put a hand in.”

Zen Zen ki ni shinai furi shitemo (Even if [I] pretend to not care at all)

Zen Zen is an adverb meaning “wholly.” When the verb it modifies is conjugated for negativity, we get “wholly not…” which normally gets translated to “not … at all.”

Ki is a noun meaning “energy.” It is going to be part of an expression.

ni is the same particle as before.

Shinai is the present, negative conjugation of the verb “suru.” “Ki ni suru” is an expression meaning “to care.”

Furishite is the participial form of “furi suru,” which means “to pretend.”

mo is the same as before. With this participle, it is a circumstantial clause, translating to “even if.”

Hora kimi ni koi shiteru (Look! I am in love with you.)

Hora is an interjection meaning “Look!”

Kimi is the same as before.

ni is the same as before, but here more of an ablative of accompaniment. So we’ll translate it as “with.”

koi is a noun meaning “love,” in a romantic sense.

shiteru is a contraction of “shite iru,” which is the present progressive conjugation of the verb “suru.” “Koi suru” means “to love.”

Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold your hand” (Let us jump out of this darkness that does not end. Hold your hand.)

4.

Okotta kao mo tsukareteru kimi mo suki da kedo (Although I even like [your] face that got angry and even you when you are tired)

Okotta is the verb “okoru,” conjugated for the past, affirmative, meaning “to be angry.” This verb modifies the noun it precedes.

Kao is a noun meaning “face.”

mo is the same as before. It is substituting a nominative marker.

Tsukareteru is a contraction of “tsukarete iru,” meaning it is the present progressive of “tsukareru,” meaning “to get tired.”

Kimi is the same as before.

mo is the same as before. Both nouns, “kimi” and “kao” are the the subjects of the sentence.

Suki is a noun meaning “the thing that I like.” So here’s the deal. “X ga suki” tends to be translated as “[I] like X.” That words perfectly fine; but don’t get the idea that “suki” in Japanese is a verb just because of the translation.

Da is the copula conjugated for the present, affirmative.

Kedo is the same as before. Here we’re going to translate it as “Although.”

Anna ni tobashite ikite daijoubu ka na to omou (I wonder if living going fast to this extent is alright.)

Anna is an adjective (gasp) meaning “such.”

ni is the adverbial suffix. “Anna ni,” thus means “suchly” or, more colloqually, “to this/that extent.”

Tobashite is the participial form of the verb “tobasu.” “Tobasu” is the transitive counterpart of “tobu.” “Tobasu” does not only mean “to fly” but also “to go fast,” among other things. It is in the participial form because it is being compounded with “ikite”

ikite is the participial form of “ikiru,” which means “to live.” It is in the participial form because the following noun tends to take the participial form has its subject. (This happens sometimes.)

Daijoubu is a noun meaning “okay” or “alright.” What’s alright? The preceding IP.

ka is the interrogative ending particle.

Na is a dubitative ending particle.

to is the quotative particle.

Omou is a verb conjugated for the present, affirmative, meaning “to think [about something.]” or “to wonder” or “to consider.” Anything that appeals to the noetic should work just fine.

Boku wa nanigenai shigusa ni furimawasareteru (I am spun around by your casual actions)

Boku is the same as before.

wa is a topic marker.

Nanigenai is an i-adjective (but actually a verb) conjugated for the present, affirmative, meaning “casual.”

Shigusa is a noun meaning “action.” Here we will translate it as “actions.”

ni is the object marker for passive verbs.

Furimawasareteru is the passive, progressive, affirmative of “furimawasu” in a contracted state. “Furimawasu” means “for one’s steps to turn around” or “to spin around”

”Sea Side Blue”

Sore demo aitsu ni muchuu nano (Even still, [does there exist] a daze [in you] by that person]?)

Sore is a noun meaning “that thing.”

Demo is the same as before. This is another expression, “sore demo,” meaning “even so.”

Aitsu ni Muchuu Nano is the same as before.


Motto kikitai koto ga atta no ni (Despite me wanting to hear more.)

Motto is an adverb meaning “more.”

Kikitai is the verb “kiku,” meaning “to hear,” conjugated in the desiderative, present, affirmative. [grapefruitcake made the wise observation that “kiku” can also mean “to ask,” and you can translate it as such and it’s a legitimate option; but which way we’re supposed to take it ultimately is unknown because we’re not given much more context.]

Koto is a noun meaning “thing.”

ga is our subject marker.

Atta is a copula, “aru,” conjugated for the past, affirmative.

no is the same as the “n” we saw before. It makes an IP a noun.

ni is a conjunction. “No ni” translates to “despite [IP]

Futari no kaiwa ga kuruma no oto ni habamarete toori ni mau yo (Our conversation was interrupted by the sounds of cars and dances in the street.)

Futari is a noun meaning “two people,” in this context “the two of us.”

no is the genitive marker.

Kaiwa is a noun meaning “conversation.” So “our conversation”

ga is the same as before.

Kuruma is a noun meaning “car.”

no is the same as before.

Oto is a noun meaning “sound.” So “the sound of cars.”

ni is the marker for the object of a passive verb.

Habamarete is the passive, participial conjugation of the verb “habamu,” meaning “to interrupt.” What I will suggest here is that this participle be connected with the verb “mau” and that “toori ni” be taken as a separate Noun Phrase.

Toori is a noun meaning “street.”

ni is again a locative ablative. So it is telling us where all this is taking place.

Mau is a verb conjugated for the present, affirmative meaning “to dance.” “Odoru” traditionally means “to hop,” and “Mau” is more of a whirling thing. So that’s the nuance. What I believe is being suggested in this verse is that the conversation because one of many sounds on the street.

yo is the same as before.

5.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

Jibun demo fushigi nanda kedo (Even though assuredly [it] is a miracle to me myself.)

Jibun is a first person, singular, reflexive pronoun meaning “myself.” It tends to be used as the indirect object. So we’ll use it as such.

demo is the same as before. Yet again, we have another expression: “Jibundemo,” meaning “I myself.”

fushigi is a noun meaning “miracle.”

nanda is an expression meaning “assuredly,” or can be translated verbally (WITH CAUTION) as “I’m sure.”

kedo is the same as before.

Nanika aru to ichusugu ni kimi ni denwa shitakunaru (If there is anything (if anything comes up), [i] Immediately want to start to call [start to want to call] you.)

Nanika is a pronoun meaning “anything.”

aru is a copula conjugated for the present, affirmative.

to is a conditional conjunction meaning “if.” It’s a very strong “if,” as well. So “X to, Y” implies that once X happens, Y will definitely happen

ichisugu is an adverb meaning “immediate.”

ni is the same adverb marker as before. So “immediately.”

kimi is the same as before.

ni is the indirect object marker.

denwa is a noun meaning “phone.” It’s also the direct object of the verb; but the direct object marker tends to be dropped or perhaps never existed in the first place.

shitakunaru is a verb mirroring another we’ve already seen before, because it is the adverbial form of the desiderative conjugation plus “naru,” which means “I want to start to X.” In this case, the verb is “suru.” The expression “denwa suru” means “to call by phone.”

Zen Zen ki no nai furi shitemo (Even if I pretend to be wholly indifferent.)

Ki no nai is the only difference between this verse and the fourth verse of the third starza. “Ki no nai” is an expression that means “indifferent,” or “half-hearted.”

Kekkyoku kimi no koto dake miteita (In the end, [I] was looking only at you.)

Kekkyoku is an adverb meaning “in the end.”

kimi is the same as before.

no is the genitive particle. (It might be the participle of the copula, but I’m not entirely sure it makes much of a difference right now. I also want to say that all genitive markers are just participles of the copula, but that’s another story.)

koto is the same as before. “Kimi no koto” translates “thing of you,” but it means “you.”

dake is the same as before.

miteita is the past, progressive, affirmative of “miru,” which means “to look at.”

Umi no kanata he tobidasou yo “Hold my hand” (Let us jump towards the other side of the ocean. Hold my hand.)

Umi is a noun meaning “ocean.”

no is the genitive particle.

kanata is a noun meaning “that way,” or, if you want to be technical, “the side that is not closest to here.” Here we can translate it at “the other side.”

he (which tends to be pronounced e, mind you) it a locative particle, which identifies motion towards. So the verb will be working towards this “other side of the ocean.”

tobidasou is the same as before. Here we can omit the “out” in our translation. Otherwise we would have to say “Let’s jump out [of one place] [and]…”

yo is the same as before.

“Hold my hand” is English.