“Hohoemi no Bakudan” from Yu Yu Hakusho

This is “Hohoemi no Bakudan,” the theme song of Yu Yu Hakusho, by Matsuko Mawatari

When compared to “Bokura wa Ima no Maka de,” this runthough is divided into 3 different pages. This is the Master Page. This is the page with the song and all the links.

Clicking the words will take you to the Vocabulary Page, where you can read the definitions of the words.

Clicking the numbers takes you to the Parsing Page, where we give you the transliteration, a crude translation, and notes on how to interpret the verses.

Enjoy!

1. 都会人ごみ ぶつかって ひとりぼっち
2. 果てない草原 ビュビュン ひとりぼっち
3. どっちだろう 泣きたくなる場所
4. 二つマルつけて ちょっぴりオトナ

5. メチャメチャ苦しいだって ふい なぜか
6. ぶち壊す 勇気POWER 湧いてくる
7. メチャメチャきびしい人達 ふい 見せた
8. やさし せいだった するだろう

9. ア・リ・ガ・ト・ウ・ゴ・ザ・イ・ます

10. まで ヨロシク元気 叫んだだろう
11. まで サヨナラ泣いて 別れただろう
12. どっちだろう 比べて多い
13. イコール書いて ちょっぴりオトナ

14. メチャメチャ悲しいときだって ふい なぜか
15. 乗り越える 勇気POWER 湧いてくる
16. メチャメチャやさしい人達 ふい 見せた
17. きびし せいだった するだろう

18. ア・リ・ガ・ト・ウ・ゴ・ザ・イ・ます

19. メチャメチャ苦しいだって ふい なぜか
20. ぶち壊す 勇気POWER 湧いてくる
21. メチャメチャきびしい人達 ふい 見せた
22. やさし せいだった するだろう

23. ア・リ・ガ・ト・ウ・ゴ・ザ・イ・ます

24. メチャメチャ楽しいときだって 忘れない
25. いつまでも 勇気POWER なくさない
26. メチャメチャひとりぼっち あげる
27.  裏側 隠してある

28. ホ・ホ・エ・ミバ・ク・ダン

 

Special Thank You to our $10 Patrons:

C.M and L.C

 

 

“Bokura wa Ima no Naka de” Love Live! OP 1

Welcome to a new format!

We have three sections in this new format. The text, the runthrough remarks, and the glossary. Click on the words you don’t know to read the glossary entry. Click the number of the phrase to see the runthough remarks.

We are currently employing some new terms for verbs. We are trying to find shorthand terms for conjugations we see all the time. If you find them too confusing, let us know! This is a time to try out different things!

Song Lyrics

1  真っ直ぐな想いみんな結ぶ
2  本気でも不器用 ぶつかり合うこころ
3  それでも見たい大きな
4  ここある 始まったばかり

5  (わかってる)
6  楽しいだけじゃない 試されるだろう
7  (わかってる)
8  だってその苦しさミライ
9  (行く)
10  集まったら強い自分なって
11  (きっと)変わり続けて(We’ll be star!)

12  それぞれ好きなこと頑張れるなら
13  新しい(場所)ゴール
14  それぞれ好きなこと信じていれば
15  ときめき(抱いて)進めるだろう

16  (恐がる捨てちゃえ)とびきりの笑顔
17  (跳んで跳んで高く) 僕らなか

18  考えるだけよりみんな走ろう
19  明日未完成 予想できないちから
20  それなら起こる奇跡必然
21  これから 何もかも全部

22  (わかってる)
23  悲しいこそ 向いてみよう
24  (わかってる)
25  もっと素晴らしくなれセカイ
26  (欲しい)
27  輝き宿したいから
28  (ぐっと) 競い合おう(We can fly!)

29  振り返るなんてない そんな気分
30  広がる()どこまでも
31  振り返るなんてない感じている
32  刺激(期待)盛り上がって

33  (弱気なさよなら)消さないで笑顔
34  (跳んで跳んで高く)僕らなか

35  大きくなるほど(試されるだろう)
36  熱さ乗り切れ(温度)
37  熱いから(すぎて)とまらない
38  無謀な賭け? 勝ちいこう!

39  それぞれ好きなこと頑張れるなら
40  新しい(場所)ゴール
41  それぞれ好きなこと信じていれば
42  ときめき(抱いて)進めるだろう

43  (恐がる捨てちゃえ)とびきりの笑顔
44  (跳んで跳んで高く)僕らなか
45  (弱気なさよなら)消さないで笑顔
46  (跳んで跳んで高く) 僕らなか

47  輝き待ってた

Runthrough Text

1

真っ直ぐな想いみんな結ぶ
(Massugu na omoi ga minna wo musubu)
(A honest desire unites all)

Massugu uses the pseudo-copula na to modify omoi. With ga, “massugu-na omoi“constitutes the subject of the sentence. Minna with wo constitutes the direct object. Our verb is musubu, in N-conjugation.

For translation purposes, you may want to supply an “of us” next to “all.” The song seems to imply that it is about the singers themselves.

2

本気でも不器用 ぶつかり合うこころ
(Honki demo bukiyou butsukari au kokoro)
(Though serious [it is] awkward, [our] hearts meet colliding)

Demo is a conjunction. It comes from the Te-form of the copula da and the secondary particle mo, meaning “too” or “even.”

We’re allowed to supply an “it is” for translation purposes. One could also say “Though [it is] serious” if one wants to.

Butsukari is the participial form of butsukaru. Here it is conjunctival, linking a series of actions together. So we have butsukari and au. We could also take it adverbially, meaning that au occurs in a manner of butsukaru.

3

それでも見たい大きな
(Soredemo mitai yo ookina yume wa)
(Even so, I want to see [it.] The big dream,)

Mitai is the desiderative conjugation of miru.

Ookina is one of the very few adjectives in Japanese. You will note, nevertheless, that it seems to be some combination of ookii and the pseudo-copula na. The reason we call it an adjective is because it cannot act as a noun, in predicative position.

If one wants to marks the topical particle as topical in translation, that is to say, to give it a lexical translation, one may say “on the subject of “ or “as for.” It is very rarely necessary, but it may help you remember to not think of this as the subject.

4

ここある 始まったばかり
(Koko ni aru yo hajimatta bakari)
([It] is here[;] It has merely begun)

Hajimatta is the NP conjugation of hajimaru.

5

わかってる
(Wakatteru)
(I understand.)

This is the TPPN conjugation of wakaru.

In Japanese, we’ve noticed that several noetic verbs tend to be said with progressive aspect to express that the action is currently taking place in the mind. So wakatteru is expressing that the act of understanding is occurring right now.

When it is expressed in the perfect tense, it means that the explanation/lesson has been given and that the mental exercise has been completed. That also gets translated as “I understand.”

6

楽しいだけじゃない 試されるだろう
(Tanoshii dake ja nai tamesareru darou)
(It is not just fun. We will be tested, won’t we?)

Nai is the NegN-conjugation of the copula aru. Ja is normally seen only with nai.

Tamerasareru is the PasN-conjugation of the verb tamesu.

7

わかってる
(Wakatteru)
(I understand.)

This is the same as verse 5.

8

だってその苦しさミライ
(Datte sono kurushi-sa mo mirai)
(Still, as for that difficulty, too, [to] the future)

Kurushisa is the adjectival verb kurushii with the suffix -sa substituting the semi-copula -i. The -sa suffix makes adjectival verbs nouns- it is a nominalizing suffix.

The mo particle has caused the topical particle wa to drop out.

Mirai has no case particle, but it would be the dative ni, serving a directional function. We have supplied a to in our translation to reflect that.

9

行く
(Iku n da yo)
(It is the case that we will go)

One does not need to translate n lexically. But if one wants to do so, one can say “it is that” or “it is the case that.”

We have translated iku as future tense, which we are allowed to do because the imperfective tense, which is what it is in Japanese, is ambiguous as to whether it is present or future.

10

集まったら強い自分なって
(Atsumattara tsuyoi jibun ni natte’ku yo)
(When [we] gather we start to become our strong selves)

Atsumattara is the -ra conditional of atsumaru. The -ra conditional often expresses a natural consequence. X-ra happens, and Y (naturally) happens. “If I drop an egg, it will break.” Because of this, it is often translated as “when” when it is is understood that X will or does, in fact, happen.

A more literal translation of this phrase would be “When we gather, we start to become ourselves, who are strong.” There is no way of making that not sound awkward in English, so we have taken a liberty with the pronoun putting the adjectival verb between the two parts of “ourselves.”

11

(きっと)変わり続けて(We’ll be star!)
((Kitto ne) kawari tsudzukete (We’ll be star!))
((Surely, right?) We will continue to change, and (We’ll be star!))

The use of the Te-form here is conjunctival. It links two actions together, in this case, “kawari tsudzukete” and “We’ll be star [sic.]” So one changes and one will be a star.

12

それぞれ好きなこと頑張れるなら
(Sorezore ga suki na koto de ganbareru nara)
(If each tries one’s best with [one’s] beloved thing)

The use of the instrumental de here is curious. It marks the medium by which one tries one’s best, but it is also on a semantic the thing one is trying one’s best from. In the song, they’re referring to their idol act and the singing and dancing involved.

Suki is a noun that tends to be glossed over. “X wa Y ga suki desu” is the paradigm usually taught as translating to “X likes Y.” But what’s really going on is that suki is a noun (with an adjectival meaning) and what you’re actually saying is “As for X, Y is liked (by X).” It’s important to keep the syntactic structure in mind.

Ganbareru is in the potential mood. The potential mood indicates whether something can or cannot happen, as opposed to the indicative mood (all the N-conjugations are indicative) which marks whether something does or does not happen. Hence it is translated as “can X.”

13

新しい(場所)ゴール
(Atarashii (basho ga) gooru da ne)
(A new place will be the goal, right?)

Note that we are translating the copula da as future tense.

14

それぞれ好きなこと信じていれば
(Sorezore no suki na koto wo shinjite ireba)
(If we believe in the thing beloved to each)

Shinjite ireba uses the -eba conditional. The -eba conditional, unlike the -ra conditional, focuses on the condition, where the if is a bigger if than usual.

Note that “sorezore no suki na koto” can’t quite translate to “beloved thing of each” because that is not grammatical. Instead, English would use “to.”

15

ときめき(抱いて)進めるだろう
(Tokimeki wo (daite) susumeru darou)
(We can embrace the thrill and move forward, right?)

Daite, the Te-form of daku, is conjunctival.

Susumeru is in the potential mood, like ganbareru in verse 12. Note that the mood applies to both daite and susumeru.

16

(恐がる捨てちゃえ)とびきりの笑顔
((Kowagaru kuse wa sute-chae) tobikiri no egao de)
((The habit of being fearful, completely throw [it] away) with an extraordinary smile)

A more literal translation of kowagaru kuse would be “a habit that is being fearful.”

Chae is the imperative conjugation of chau. Here it means “to complete,” which is a bit of an awkward translation, but it means to do something completely.

17

(跳んで跳んで高く) 僕らなか
((Tonde tonde tataku) bokura wa ima no naka de)
((Fly, fly high) we [are] in the middle of the present moment)

The Te-form here is imperative.

Tataku is the adverbial conjugation of takai. The adverbial form is made by putting the suffix -ku in place of the semi-copula -i.

One can translation “ima no naka de” as just “in the present moment” but we translated it as we did to reflect the syntactic structure as the original Japanese. The exact location with location nouns tends to be in the genitive (the middle of X, under Y, to the right of Z, etc.)

18

考えるだけよりみんな走ろう
(Kangaeru dake yori minna de hashirou)
(Rather than only think about [it], let us run with everyone)

Hashirou is the volitional conjugation of hashiru. The volitional mood in Japanese is very often cohortative, inviting the listener to do something with the speaker: “Let us…”

19

明日未完成 予想できないちから
(Ashita wa mikansei yosou dekinai chikara)
(Tomorrow, [it is] incomplete, [we have] an ability that cannot predict)

Yousou dekinai chikara” is a rather odd phrase. It does actually translate to “an ability that cannot predict.” Verb phrases that precede nouns always modify the noun.

20

それなら起こる奇跡必然
(Sorenara okoru yo kiseki wa hitsuzen)
(If that is so, it will happen, as for a miracle, [it is] necessary)

We have supplied an “it is” because we are lacking a subject and a copula.

21

これから 何もかも全部
(kore kara da yo nanimokamo zenbu ga)
(Anything and everything, all is after this.)

This is a case of word scrambling. The order it would normally be in is “nanimokamo zenbu ga kore kara da yo.”

If you want to omit nanimokamo in your translation because semantically it is redundant — zenbu meaning something very similar — you can do that.

22

わかってる
(Wakatteru)
(I understand.)

This is the same as verse 5.

23

悲しいこそ 向いてみよう
(Kanashii toki ni koso ue wo muite miyou)
(During sad times, for sure, let us face and look above)

This dative is the dative of time.

Muite is the Te-form of muku, functioning conjunctively.

Miyou is the volitional conjugation of miru, functioning cohortatively.

24

わかってる
(Wakatteru)
(I understand.)

This is the same as verse 5.

25

もっと素晴らしくなれセカイ
(Motto subarashiku nare sekai)
([It is] the world that will become more wonderful)

To express “to become X” where X is an adjectival verb, the adjectival verb will take its adverbial form.

Nare seems to be a variation of the N-conjugation (poetic licensing).

We are assuming in our translation that verses 23 and 25 are connected, i.e. the listener is told to look up, and up there lies the world that will become more wonderful.

26

欲しい
(Hoshii n da yo)
(It is the case that [it] is desired)

This is merely an adjectival verb with a substantivizing dependent noun. Nothing worth noting here.

27

輝き宿したいから
(Kagayaki wo mune ni yadoshitai kara)
(Because I want to keep the radiance in [my] chest)

Yadoshitai is the desiderative conjugation of yadosu. All things expressing inner thoughts and desires in Japanese are taken to be very personal. If one wants to express the thoughts of desires of others, one must say something like “it appears he/she wants…” So any time you see a desiderative conjugation that is not in a subordinate clause, then you know it is about the speaker him/herself.

28

(ぐっと) 競い合おう(We can fly!)
((Gutto ne) kisoiaou yo (We can fly!))
((Firmly, right?) Let us compete for it (We can fly!))

Kisoiaou is the volitional conjugation of kisoiau, functioning cohortatively.

29

振り返るなんてない そんな気分
(Fukikaeru hima nante nai ne sonna kibun sa)
(There isn’t anything like free time to look back, such [is] the feeling!)

We have translated “fukukaeru hima” as “free time to look back” instead of as “free time that looks back.” This is because the latter sounds awkward in English and in Japanese this is how “free time (to do X)” is expressed in Japanese. It’s quite common.

We have translated sa as an exclamation mark. Sa is quite strong. Stronger than yo, certainly. We tend to advise against translating yo as an exclamation mark because it is so common and exclamation marks are uncommon, but we believe translation sa with an exclamation mark is often appropriate because of its strength and rarity.

30

広がる()どこまでも
((Hirogaru yo (kimi to) dokomademo)
(([I] will spread out (with you) anywhere)

This is another case of scrambling. It would otherwise read “Dokomademo kimi to hirogaru yo.”

31

振り返るなんてない感じている
(Furikaeru hima nante nai to kanjite iru yo)
(I feel like there isn’t anything like free time to look back)

Kanjite iru is the PPN-conjugation of kanjiru. This is like wakaru that uses the progressive aspect for the same reason.

32

刺激(期待)盛り上がって
(Shigeki e no (kitai) moriagatte’ku)
((The hope) that is for the stimulus begins to swell)

The use of e here is a bit peculiar. The object of shigeki tends to take the dative. The use of the locative here seems to be an artistic license.

The use of the attributive no here should not be confused for a compound particle.

Moriagatte’ku has the same conjugation as natte’ku in verse 10.

33

(弱気なさよなら)消さないで笑顔
((Yowaki na boku ni sayoranara) kesanai de egao de)
((To timid me, goodbye) do not extinguish it, with a smile)

Kesanai de is a truncation of the polite negative request expression “Vnai de kudasai.” What exactly that de is, we are unsure. We believe it is the instrumental particle and that this use of a case particle with a verb phrase implies that there used to be a no between the verb and the de, but that is speculative.

34

(跳んで跳んで高く)僕らなか
((Tonde tonde takaku) boku-ra to ima no naka wo)
((Fly, fly high) with us through the middle of the present moment)

This is largely the same as verse 17.

Note the rare use of the accusative particle wo to mark movement through.

35

大きくなるほど(試されるだろう)
(Yume ga ookiku naru hodo (tamesareru darou))
([To the] the extent that the dream will become large (we will be tested, right?))

What part of speech hodo is exactly is hard to identify. It works adverbially inasmuch as it modifies a verb phrase, but it itself is modified by an inflexional phrase. What it “X hodo Y” means is that Y happens to the extent that X happens. Jay Rubin has pointed out that it’s like the Johnny Carson jokes, “It’s so hot that…X” or “She’s so old that…X” So if you’re old enough to remember Johnny Carson you’ll have a nice reference point.

Here what’s being expressed is that the more the dream grows, the more they are put the test. And that makes sense, right?

36

熱さ乗り切れ(温度)
(Mune no atsu-sa de norikire (boku no ondo wa))
(I will overcome with the heat of [my] chest (as for my temperature))

Norikire is probably a variation of the N-conjugation, like nare in verse 25.

37

熱いから(すぎて)とまらない
(Atsui kara (atsu-sugite) tomaranai)
(Because it is hot, (it is too hot, and) I will not stop)

Sugite is conjunctival here.

38

無謀な賭け? 勝ちいこう!
(Mupou na kake? Kachi ni ikou!)
([Is it] a reckless gamble? Let us go to victory!)

We have supplied an “it is” because of a lack of a copula.

Ikou is the volitional conjugation, which is once again functioning cohortatively.

39

それぞれ好きなこと頑張れるなら
(Sorezore ga suki na koto de ganbareru nara)
(If each tries one’s best with [one’s] beloved thing)

This is the same as verse 12.

40

新しい(場所)ゴール
(Atarashii (basho ga) gooru da ne)
(A new (place) will be the goal, right?)

This is the same as verse 13.

41

それぞれ好きなこと信じていれば
(Sorezore no suki na koto wo shinjite ireba)
(If we believe in the thing beloved to each)

This is the same as verse 14.

42

ときめき(抱いて)進めるだろう
(Tokimeki wo (daite) susumeru darou)
(We can (embrace) the thrill and move forward, right?)

This is the same as verse 15.

43

(恐がる捨てちゃえ)とびきりの笑顔
(Kowagaru kuse wa sute-chae) tobikiri no egao de)
((The habit of being fearful, completely throw [it] away) with an extraordinary smile)

This is the same as verse 16.

44

(跳んで跳んで高く)僕らなか
((Tonde tonde takaku) boku-ra to ima wo)
((Fly, fly high) with us through the present moment)

This sentence is a shorter version of verse 34.

45

(弱気なさよなら)消さないで笑顔
((Yowaki na boku ni sayoranara) kesanai de egao de)
((To timid me, goodbye) do not extinguish it, with a smile)

This is the same as verse 33.

46

(跳んで跳んで高く) 僕らなか
((Tonde tonde tataku) bokura wa ima no naka de)
(Fly, fly high) we [are] in the middle of the present moment)

This is the same as verse 17.

47

輝き待ってた
(Kagayaki wo matte’ta)
([We] have looked forward to the radiance)

Matte’ta is the TPPN- conjugation of matsu.

Glossary

_

Desiderative conjugation — the conjugation made by adding -tai to the participial conjugation.

_

-eba conditional — the conditional conjugation formed by using -eba in place of the final temporal/polar suffix (-u or -i.) Note that when it takes the place of -i, a series of underlying letters will appear to create -kereba.

_

Imperative conjugation — the imperative conjugation formed by placing the suffix -e in place of the final temporal/polar suffix. In the case of the so-called -ru verbs, the suffix is -yo or -ro.

_

N-conjugation — the “normal” conjugation. This is also sometimes called the “dictionary form,” or the indicative, active, imperfective, affirmative.

_

NegN-conjugation — the “negative normal conjugation,” like the “normal conjugation” in all aspects except negative.

_

NP-conjugation — the “normal perfect” conjugation. This is the same as the “normal” conjugation, except with perfect tense.

_

PasN-conjugation — the “passive normal” conjugation. This is the same as the “normal” conjugation, except with passive voice.

_

PPN-conjugation – the “periphrastic progressive normal” conjugation. This is the Te-form of a verb plus the copula iru, giving the verb progressive aspect. Otherwise, it has all the other characteristics of an N-conjugation.

_

-ra conditional — the conditional created through the indicative perfect conjugation of a verb plus the -ra suffix

_

TPPN-conjugation — the “truncated periphrastic progressive normal” conjugation. This is the Te-form of a verb plus the copula iru, giving the verb progressive aspect. Otherwise, it has all the other characteristics of an N-conjugation. The truncation comes from the /i/ in iru dropping out.

_

Volitional conjugation — the conjugation created by using the -ou suffix in place of the polar/temporal suffix. For the so-called ru verbs, the suffix will be -you. (What really happens is that the suffix is always -you, but the /y/ is only visible in the underlying form. There is an underlying vowel that -ru verbs have that makes that /y/ appear.)

_

ある (aru) — (verb) copula. This copula is used for non-animated objects. It, and iru, are used to express the existence of a thing. The negative pole of aru is nai.

_

明日 (ashita) — (noun) tomorrow

_

新しい (atarashii) — (adjectival verb) new

_

熱い (atsui) — (adjectival verb) hot (to the touch)

_

集まる (atsumaru) — (verb) to come together

_

合う (au) — (verb) to come together, to merge

_

ばかり (bakari) — (suffix) only, merely

_

場所 (basho) — (noun) place, location

_

僕 (boku) — (pronoun) masculine first-person singular pronoun. To pluralize it, one uses the suffix -ra.

_

不器用  (bukiyou) — (noun) unskilled, awkward, clumsy [na]

_

ぶつかる (butsukaru) — (verb) to clash, to collide with

_

ちゃう (chau) — (verb) to complete X, for X to happen and it to be an inconvenience

_

ちから (chikara) — (noun) power, ability

_

だ (da) — (verb) copula. Establishes a relationship of identity or categorization between two things. “X is Y.” Contrast this to aru and iru, which only establish the existence of a thing. “There is an X.”

_

だろう (darou) — (ending particle) verbal expression acting as an ending particle. Essentially equivalent to ne, being dubitative, if only more casual.

_

だけ (dake) — (suffix) only

_

抱く (daku) — (verb) to embrace

_

だって (datte) — (conjunction) though, still. This is a verbal expression, with the copula da and the causal topical particle tte

_

で (de) — (inflection particle) instrumental particle. The instrumental case marks the means by which (tools) or the reason for which an action is performed. It will also mark company from time to time, with whom something is done.

_

で (de) — (post-position) at, in. It marks a location (or sometimes time)

_

できる (dekiru) — (verb) to be able to do. This is the verb used in lieu of a potential conjugation of suru, the verb meaning “to do.”

_

でも (demo) — (conjunction) though. From the Te-form of the copula da and secondary particle mo, meaning, “too” or “even.”

_

どこまでも (dokomademo) — (adverb) anywhere. From dokomade (from the pronoun doko and the post-position made) and the suffix mo.

_

へ (e) — (inflection particle) locative particle. The location case marks a direction towards, which is a function it shares with the dative particle.

_

笑顔 (egao) — (noun) smile

_

振り返る (furikaeru) — (verb) to look back

_

が (ga) — (inflection particle) nominative particle. The nominative case mainly marks the subject of an inflexional phrase. It will on occasion mark the direct object of a verb in an emphatic sense.

_

頑張る (ganbaru) — (verb) to do one’s best, to persist

_

ゴール (gooru) — (noun) goal

_

ぐっと (gutto) — (adverb) firm(ly)

_

走る (hashiru) — (verb) to run

_

始まった (hajimaru) — (verb) to begin, to start

_

暇 (hima) — (noun) free time

_

広がる (hirogaru) — (verb) to spread out

_

必然 (hitsuzen) — (noun) necessary [no]

_

ほど (hodo) — (noun) extent, degree (We are still undecided about what exactly this word is. It is probably an adverb as well as a noun, but we do not want to say for sure yet.)

_

本気 (honki) — (noun) truth; serious [na/no]

_

欲しい (hoshii) — (adjectival verb) wanted, desired

_

行く (iku) — (verb) to go; (with Te-form) to start to X, to go on X-ing

_

今 (ima) — (noun/adverb) now; the present moment

_

じゃ (ja) — contracted form of the compound particle de wa, which is equivalent to the topical wa.

_

自分 (jibun) — (pronoun) oneself, myself (reflexive pronoun)

_

勝ち (kachi) — (noun) victory

_

輝き (kagayaki) — (noun) radiance

_

賭け (kake) — (noun) gamble

_

悲しい (kanashii) — (adjectival verb) sad

_

考える (kangaeru) — (verb) to think about, to consider

_

感じる (kanjiru) — to have a feeling, to feel, to sense

_

から (kara) — (conjunction) because

_

から (kara) — (post-position) from, after

_

消す (kesu) — (verb) to extinguish, to turn off; to erase

_

変わる (kawaru) — (verb) to change, to be transformed

_

気分 (kibun) — (noun) feeling

_

君 (kimi) — (pronoun) masculine second person pronoun

_

奇跡 (kiseki) — (noun) miracle

_

競い合おう (kisoiau) — (verb) to compete for. From kisou, meaning “to vie for” and au, meaning “to meet.”

_

期待 (kitai) — (noun) hope, expectation

_

きっと (kitto) — (adverb) surely, undoubtedly

_

ここ (koko) — (pronoun) here

_

こころ (kokoro) — (noun) mind, heart (not the biological organ)

_

これ (kore) — (pronoun) this (thing)

_

こそ (koso) — (secondary particle) for sure

_

こと (koto) — (noun) thing. Sometimes it is used like the dependent nouns no and n.

_

恐がる (kowagaru) — (verb) to be fearful; to be shy

_

苦しい (kurushii) — (adjectival verb) difficult, painful

_

癖 (kuse) — (noun) habit

_

真っ直ぐ (massugu) — (noun) honest, direct, straightforward [na]

_

待つ (matsu) — (verb) to wait; to look forward to

_

未完成 (mikansei) — (noun) complete [na]

_

みんな (minna) — (noun) everyone, all

_

ミライ (mirai) — (noun) the (distant) future

_

見る (miru) — (verb) to see

_

も (mo) — (secondary particle) too, even. This particle will cause wa, wo, and ga to drop out if it follows any of them.

_

盛り上がる (moriagaru) — (verb) to swell, to rise

_

もっと (motto) — (adverb) more

_

向く (muku) — (verb) to face, to turn towards

_

胸 (mune) — (noun) chest

_

無謀 (mupou) — (noun) reckless [na]

_

結ぶ (musubu) — (verb) to bind, to link

_

ん (n) — substantivizing dependent noun. It makes the entire verb phrase syntactically a noun.

_

なか (naka) — (noun) the middle, the center, in

_

何もかも (nanimokamo) — (adverb) anything and everything. From nanimo (from nani and the secondary suffix mo) and the secondary suffix kamo

_

なんて (nante) — (suffix) something like…

_

なら (nara) — (conjunction) if

_

なる (naru) — (verb) to become

_

ね (ne) — (ending particle) dubitative ending particle. Expresses a desire for a confirmation from the user. Often it will soften a statement. It is often translated to “,right?” or “isn’t it?”

_

に (ni) — (inflectional particle) dative particle. The dative case marks the location for the copulae aru and iru. It marks the direction of verbs involving movement. It marks the exact time of an action. It marks the indirect object, and the direct object of certain verbs. It marks the manner in which something is done.

_

の (no) — (case particle) genitive particle. The genitive case marks categorization or possession. It will in subordinating clauses at times mark the subject of the very subordinate clause. “X no Y” tends to translate to “Y of X” and even when it doesn’t it puts one in a good ballpark of what it should be.

_

の (no) — (verb) attributive form of the copula da. When a copula is needed in a  verb phrase that is modifying a noun phrase, one uses no.

_

乗り切る (norikiru) — (verb) to overcome, to get over; to sail across

_

起こる (okoru) — (verb) to occur

_

想い (omoi) — (noun) thought; desire

_

温度 (ondo) — (noun) temperature

_

大きい (ookii) — (adjectival verb) large, big

_

大きな (ookina) — (adjective) big, large

_

さ (sa) — (ending particle) masculine emphatic ending particle. It also finds its way to other parts of the sentence from time to time, where it emphasizes the preceding phrase.

_

さよなら (sayorana) — (interjection) “goodbye.” From sayounara. This is a combination of “sa,” which is an adjective meaning “that;” “you” is a suffix meaning “like;” and “nara, the conditional conjunction. This means something like “If that’s the way it is.”

_

セカイ (sekai) — (noun) world

_

刺激 (shigeki) — (noun) stimulus

_

信じる (shinjiru) — (verb) to believe in, to trust in

_

その (sono) — (adjective) that. This is not really an adjective. This is a morpheme, /so/, and the attributive form of the copula da, no.

_

それでも (soredemo) — (conjunction) Even so, nevertheless. From the pronoun sore, meaning “that thing” and demo.

_

それなら (sorenara) — (conjunction) if that is so. This comes from the pronoun “sore” and the conditional conjunction “nara.”

_

それぞれ (sorezore) — (pronoun) each. This is the pronoun sore twice. Literally, “that that”

_

素晴らしい (subarashii) — (adjectival verb) wonderful

_

すぎる (sugiru) — (verb) (tends to work with the stem of another verb preceding it) to X in excess, to X too much

_

好き (suki) — (noun) liked, beloved [na]

_

進む (susumu) — (verb) to move forward, to advance

_

捨てる (suteru) — (verb) to throw away

_

高い (takai) — (adjectival verb) high; expensive

_

試す (tamesu) — to attempt; to test; to try out

_

楽しい (tanoshii) — (adjectival verb) fun

_

と (to) — (functional particle) quotative particle. This particle marks a subordinate clause, expressing the object of a verb. These verbs tend to be about thoughts and utterances. The quotative particle will also mark certain adverbs, mostly onomatopoeia.

_

と (to) — (inflection particle) comitative particle. The comitative case marks the person with whom something is done. It has limited uses.

_

とびきり (tobikiri) — (noun) extraordinary, exceptional [no]

_

跳ぶ (tobu) — (verb) to fly; to jump

_

時 (toki) — (noun) time

_

ときめき (tokimeki) — (noun) throbbing; thrill, excitement

_

とまる (tomaru) — (verb) to stop

_

続ける (tsudzukeru) — (verb) to continue; (with participial form) to continue to X

_

上 (ue) — (noun) top, above, up

_

は (wa) — (inflection particle) topical particle. The topical case marks the topic of the sentence. In certain cases, mostly when the topic and the subject of the sentence are on a semantic level the same, in translation, the topical phrase is made into the subject (Japanese sentences do not need a subject. Many other languages, such as English, do.)

_

わかる (wakaru) — to understand, to be known

_

を (wo) — (inflection particle) accusative particle. The accusative case mainly marks the direct object of a verb. It will on a few occasions mark a thing through which another thing has moved.

_

宿す (yadosu) — (verb) to carry; to keep within

_

よ (yo) — (ending particle) serves to emphasize a point. Also conveys that this is information the listener should remember.

_

より (yori) — (post-position) (rather) than

_

予想 (yosou) — (noun) expectation; prediction [suru]

_

弱気 (yowaki) — (noun) timid, shy [na]

_

夢 (yume) — (noun) dream

_

全部 (zenbu) — (noun) all, the whole

“Cha-La Head-Cha-La” (Dragon Ball Z Theme) & Dragon Ball: Xenoverse (Part 2)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

I felt so bad for telling you guys about social media stuff that I wanted to make up for it with something we’re going to need for our next little project, which is Dragon Ball Xenoverse. The game’s theme song is Flow’s rendition of “Cha-La Head Cha-La.” Here are the lyrics and the complete parsing. Enjoy!

光る雲を突き抜けFly Away (Fly Away)
からだじゅうに広がるパノラマ
頭を蹴られた地球が怒って (怒って)
火山を爆発させる

溶けた北极の中に
恐竜がいたら玉り仕込みたいね

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
何が起きても気分はヘのヘのカッパ
CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
胸がパチパチするほど
騒ぐ元気玉…Sparking!

空を急降下 Jet Coaster (Coaster)
落ちてゆくよパニックの楽园へ
景色 逆さになると愉快さ (愉快さ)
山さえ お尻に見える

悩む時間はないよ
何処かに潜む「ビックリ!」 に逢いたいから

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
頭カラッポの方が夢詰め込める
CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA
笑顔ウルトラゼットで
今日もアイヤイヤイヤイヤイ

So, without further ado…

光る雲を突き抜けFly Away (Fly Away)
(HIkaru kumo wo tsukinuke Fly Away (Fly Away))

光る (hikaru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to shine.” This Verb Phrase (which will automatically be an Inflexional Phrase) is in the attributive position, i.e. preceding a Noun Phrase.

雲 (kumo): is a noun meaning “cloud.” So this is the “clouds that shine.”

を (wo): is our accusative marker. The accusative marker is that which indicates that the preceding Noun Phrase is the direct object of the verb.

突き抜け (tsukinuke): is the imperative of the verb “tsukinuku,” which means “to penetrate” or “to pierce through.”

からだじゅうに広がるパノラマ
(Karada-juu-ni hirogaru panorama)

からだじゅうに (Karada-juu-ni): is an adverb made up of “karada,” a noun meaning body, “juu,” a suffix meaning “inside,” and the adverbial suffix “ni.” Thus the adverb meaning “inside my body” or “throughout the body.”

広がる (hirogaru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to spread out.”

パノラマ (panorama): is a loanword noun meaning “panorama.”

頭を蹴られた地球が怒って (怒って)
(Atama wo kerareta chikyuu ga okotte (okotte))

頭 (atama): is a noun meaning “head.”

を (wo): is the same as before.

蹴られた (kerareta): is the passive, affirmative, past conjugation of the verb “keru,” meaning “to kick.” In a passive voice sentence, you’d expect the thing affected by the verb to be in the nominative case, but not here. Why? Because this is something interesting about Japanese, where the only thing that changes in an otherwise active voiced sentence is the verb. This is sometimes called the “suffering passive,” which is a kind of expression that just states that the events in this sentence are inconvenient.

地球 (chikyuu): is a noun meaning “the earth.”

が (ga): is our nominative marker, indicating the subject of the sentence.

怒って (okotte): is the Te-form, or gerund (so to speak), of the verb “okoru,” meaning “to get angry.” The Te-form allows us to link verbs in sequence.

火山を爆発させる
(Kazan wo bakuhatsu sareru)

火山 (kazan): is a noun meaning “volcano.” It literally means “fire mountain.”

を (wo): is the same as always.

爆発 (bakuhatsu): is a noun meaning “explosion.” This is one of those nouns that works in conjunction with “suru” to become a verb.

させる (saseru): is the causative, affirmative, present of “suru.” The causative mood indicates that one thing is made to happen.

Translation:
“I piece through the shining clouds “Fly Away”
A panorama spreads out through my body
The earth, kicked in the face, gets angry
And a volcano is made to explode”

溶けた北極の中に
(Toketa hokkyoku no naka ni)

溶けた (toketa): a verb conjugated for the affirmative, past meaning “to melt.”

北極 (hokkyoku): in a noun meaning “the North Pole.”

の (no): is our genitive particle. “X no Y” translates to “Y of X.”

中 (naka): is the Japanese-reading counterpart of the “juu” we saw a moment ago. It means “in the middle” or “within” or “inside.”

に (ni): is our dative particle, indicating location.

恐竜がいたら玉乗り仕込みたいね
(Kyouryou ga itara tamanori shikomitai ne)

恐竜 (kyouryou): is a noun meaning “dinosaur.” It literally translates to “scary dragon.”

が (ga): is our nominative particle.

いたら (itara): is the conditional, affirmative conjugation of “iru,” one of Japanese’s three copula.

玉乗り (tamanori): is a noun meaning “balancing on a ball.” It comes from “tama,” meaning “ball,” and “nori,” the participle of “noru,” meaning “to ride.”

仕込みたい (shikomitai): is the desiderative, affirmative conjugation of “shikomu,” meaning “to train.”

ね (ne): is the dubitative/softening ending particle. The desiderative in Japanese is very strong. It’s often warranted to add a “ne” at the end, or to use the gerund of the verb and conjugate “miru” to the desiderative.

Translation:
“Within the melted North Pole,
If there is a dragon, I want to train it to balance on a ball.”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Means as much in English as it does in Japanese

何が起きても気分はヘのヘのカッパ
(Nani ga okite mo kibun wa he no he no kappa)

何 (nani): is an interrogative pronoun meaning “what?”

が (ga): is the nominative particle.

起きて (okite): is the gerund of “okiru,” meaning “to get up” or “to occur.”

も (mo): is a secondary particle meaning “even” and “too.” This is an expression. I don’t believe this sentence makes grammatical sense. “Nani ga Xte mmo” means “No matter what X.”

気分 (kibun): is a noun meaning “mood” or “feeling.”

は (wa): is our topical particle. This is not the subject, but the topic, which is something that exists syntactically outside of the basic structure of an IP.

(ヘの)ヘのカッパ (he no kappa): is an expression. I have no idea why it means what it means, but it means “easy to do.”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Is the same verse as before.

胸がパチパチするほど
(Mune ga pachi-pachi suru hodo)

胸 (mune): is a noun meaning “chest.”

が (ga): is our nominative particle.

パチパチ (pachi-pachi): is an onomatopoetic adverb referring to something popping open or clapping along. This is one’s heard thumping.

する (suru): is the affirmative, present conjugation of our verb meaning “to do.” It’s working in conjunction with “pachi-pachi,” meaning “to pachi-pachi.”

ほど (hodo): is a tricky word meaning “extent.” It’s a sort of noun with an adverbial meaning. What exactly “hodo” is communicating depends on context. Here I’ll tell you that “hodo” is comparing two things. So S1 is happening to the same extent as S2 is happening.

騒ぐ元気玉…Sparking!
(Sawagu genki-dama… Sparkling!)

騒ぐ (sawagu): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to make a sound.” I wish there were a good way of translating this without making it sound dumb.

元気玉 (genki-dama): is an attack used by Goku, it’s the “spirit bomb” in English. In Japanese, it means the “energy (or “spirit”) ball.”
Translation:
“Cha-la Head-Cha-la
No matter what occurs, the feeling is no big deal
Cha-la Head-Cha-la
To the extend that my chest is beating
The Spirit Bomb sounds… Sparking!“

空を急降下 Jet Coaster (Coaster)
(Sora wo kyuukouka Jet Coaster (Coaster))

空 (sora): is a noun meaning “sky.” If you know Sora from Kingdom Hearts, this is where he gets his name from.

を (wo): is the same as always.

急降下 (kyuukouka): is a noun meaning “nose dive” or “swoop”

落ちてゆくよパニックの楽園へ
(Ochite yuku yo paniku no rakuen he)

落ちて (ochite): is the Te-form of “ochiru,” meaning “to fall.” This Te-form will indicate a series of actions.

ゆく (yuku): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to proceed” or “to go.” My understanding is that it’s a poetic word.

よ (yo): is the emphatic ending particle.

パニック (paniku): is a loanword noun meaning “panic.”

の (no): is the genitive particle.

楽園 (rakuen): is a noun meaning “paradise.”

へ (he): is our locative particle. It only indicates location. It’s good to note that the particle “he” tends to be pronounced “e.” This last noun phrase is displaced and should go before the “yo” in your translation.

景色 逆さになると愉快さ (愉快さ)
(Keshiki sakasa ni naru to yukai-sa)

景色 (keshiki): is a noun meaning “scenery.” There is an omitted “wa” here.

逆さ (sakasa): Is a noun meaning “the reverse” or “upside down.”

に (ni): is the dative particle working with “naru.”

なる (naru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to become.”

と (to): is a conditional conjunction. A very strong conditional is established with “to.” If the antecedent is true, then the consequent will definitively happen.

愉快 (yukai): is a noun meaning “pleasantness” or “happiness.”

さ (sa): is an emphatic ending particle.

山さえお尻に見える
(Yama-sae o-shiri ni mieru)

山さえ (yama-sae): is the noun “yama,” meaning “mountain,” and the suffix “-sae” which indicates that the subject is something unexpected, often translated to “even.”

お尻 (o-shiri): is the noun “shiri,” meaning “butt,” with the honorable suffix “o.”

に (ni): is the dative particle, which the verb “mieru” uses.

見える (mieru): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present meaning “to be seen” or “to look like.”

Translation:
“A jet coaster that swoops through the sky
it falls and goes a paradise of panic
When the scenery is turned upside down there is happiness!
Even the mountains look like butts!”

悩む時間はないよ
(Nayamu jikan wa nai yo)

悩む (nayamu): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to be worried.”

時間 (jikan): is a noun meaning “a period of time” but can just be translated as “a time.”

は (wa): is our topical particle.

ない (nai): is a verb conjugated for the negative, present, of the copula “aru.”

よ (yo): is the same as before.


何処かに潜む「ビックリ!」 に逢いたいから

何処か (dokoka): is an indefinite pronoun meaning “somewhere” or “anywhere.”

に (ni): is our dative particle.

潜む (hisomu): is a verb conjugated for the affirmative, present, meaning “to lurk” or “to be hidden.”

ビックリ (bikkuri): is a noun meaning “surprise.” Fun fact: in Japanese a jack-in-the-box is called is “bikkuri bago,” a “surprise box.”

に (ni): is the dative particle working with this conjugation of “au.”

逢いたい (aitai): is the desiderative, affirmative conjugation of “au,” meaning “to meet.”

から (kara): is a conjugation meaning “because.”

Translation:
“There is no time to be worried!
Because I want to meet the ‘surprise’ hidden somewhere!”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Same as always.

頭カラッポの方が夢詰め込める
(Atama karappo no hou ga yume tsumekomeru)

頭 (atama): is the same as before.

カラッポ (karappo): is a noun meaning “empty.”

の方が (no-hou-ga): is an expression. It’s a way of describing preference. “No” is the genitive particle. “Hou” is a noun meaning “way” or “direction.” And “ga” is the nominative particle. It’s a way of saying that this way is the definitive way. (It works often with “yori.”) So one would rather an “atama karappo”

夢 (yume): is a noun meaning “dream.”

詰め込める (tsumekomeru): is a verb conjugated for the potential, affirmative, present, from “tsumekomu,” meaning “to stuff” or “to jam.”

CHA-LA HEAD-CHA-LA

Same as always.

笑顔ウルトラゼットで
(Egao urutora zetto de)

笑顔 (egao): is a noun meaning “smiling face.”

ウルトラ (urutora): is a loanword noun meaning “ultra.”

ゼット (zetto): is another loanword noun meaning the letter “Z,” which in many placed is pronounced “zed.”

で (de): is the Te-form of the copula “da.”


今日もアイヤイヤイヤイヤイ

今日 (ima): is a noun meaning “today” or “now.”

も (mo): is a seconary particle meaning “too” or “even.”

アイヤイヤイヤイヤイ (ai-yai-yai-yai-yai): is gibberish.

Translation:
“Cha-La Head-Cha-La
I prefer an empty head to cram with dreams
Cha-La Head-Cha-La
My smiling face being ultra Z
Even now I am ‘ai-yai-yai-yai-yai’”

And we’re done! When we do DBX tomorrow, I’ll be referring you all to this post as a Part 2. And please check out our Facebook page while you’re here!

“Dan Dan Kokoro Hikareteku” (Dragon Ball GT Theme)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

I am back with something I haven’t done in about a year: parse anime opening lyrics. Here we have the iconic opening from Dragon Ball GT, which is probably the only worthwhile thing to come from the show.

[I’m making 3 edits, which you will see in brackets [] and italics and the original with a strikethrough A special thanks to @grapefruitcake for always pointing things out and keeping me on my toes in these matters.]

This is going to be an entire parsing in one go.


DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
その眩しい笑顏に
果てない暗闇 から 飛び出そう  Hold my hand

君と出合った時
子供のころ大切に想っていた景色 を思い出したんだ
僕と踊ってくれないか
光と彩 のWinding Road, 今でもあいつに 夢中なの?
少しだけ 振り向きたくなるような時もあるけど
愛と勇氣と誇りを 持って戦うよ

DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
この宇宙の希望のかけら
きっと誰もが永遠を手に人れたい
ZEN ZEN 気にしないフリしても
ほら君に戀してる
果てない暗闇から飛びだそう  Hold your hand

怒った顏も疲れてる君も好きだげど
あんなに飛ばして生きて大丈夫かなと思う
僕は…何気ないしぐさに踏み回されてる
Sea Side Blue
それでもあいつに夢中なの?
もっと聞きたいことかあったのに
二人の会話か車の音にはばまれて通りに舞うよ

DAN DAN 心魅かれてく
自分でも不思議なんだけど
何かあるとすぐに君に電話したくなる
ZEN ZEN 気のないフリしても
結局君のことだけ見ていた
海の彼方へ飛ぴ出そうよ Hold my hand

The first order of business is to get everything into Romaji. I promise that it’s all transliterated into the same format of verses and stanzas as I have above.

1.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
Sono mabushii eigao [egao] ni
Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold my hand”

2.
Kimi to deatta toki
Kodomo no koro taisetsu ni motteita basho wo omoidashitanda
Boku to odotte kurenai ka
hikari to kage no “winding road”, ima demo aitsu ni muchuu nano
Sukoshi dake furimukitakunaru youna toki mo aru kedo
Ai to yuuki to hokori wo motte tatakau yo

3.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
kono uchuu no kibou no kakera
Kitto daremo ga eien wo te ni iretai
Zen Zen ki ni shinai furi shitemo
Hora kimi ni koi shiteru
Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold your hand”

4.
Okotta kao mo tsukareteru kimi mo suki da kedo
Anna ni tobashiteikite daijoubu ka na to omou
Boku wa nanigenai shigusa ni furimawasareteru
”Sea Side Blue”
Sore demo aitsu ni muchuu nano
motto kikitai koto ga atta no ni
Futari no kaiwa ga kuruma no noto ni habamarete toori ni mau yo

5.
Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku
Jibundemo fushigi nanda kedo
Nanika aru to ichisugu ni kimi ni denwa shitakunaru
Zen Zen ki no nai furi shitemo
Kekkyoku kimi no koto dake miteita
Umi no kanata he tobidasou yo “Hold my hand”

1.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

Dan Dan is an onomatopoeia meaning “slowly.”

Kokoro is a noun meaning “heart” in the metaphorical sense, so not the organ.

Hikareteku is a contraction of “hikarete iku.” “Hikarete” is the Te-form, henceforth called the participle form, of “hikareru,” which means “to be charmed.” “Iku” is a verb meaning “to go.” What it is doing here is functioning similarly to “Iru” in the “te iru” construction, i.e. the periphrastic present progressive. The agent of this verb takes the Ni particle.

Sono mabushii eigao [egao] ni (By that radiant smile)

Sono is an adjective (adjective! gasp!) meaning “that.”

Mabushii is a so-called i-adjective, which is actually a verb, conjugated for the present, meaning “radiant.” It modifies the next word.

Eigao is a noun meaning “smile.”

Ni is an ablative particle. Here it functions as an “ablative of agent.”

Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold my hand” (Let us jump out of this darkness that does not end. Hold my hand.)

Hatenai is the present, negative conjugation of the verb “hateru,” which means “to end.” Because it precedes a noun, it means that this verb, the sole constituent of this inflexional phrase, it modifies the noun.

Kurayami is a noun meaning “darkness.” So this is the “darkness that does not end.”

Kara is a post-position that means movement away from. It’s usually translated as “from,” but because of the main verb in this phrase, it’d be prudent to use a stronger translation. I’ve chosen “out of.”

Tobidasou is a conjunction of two verbs: “Tobi” and “Dasu.” “Tobi” means “to leap” or “to fly.” “Dasu” is a verb meaning “to take out” or “to bring something out.” Together they mean “to jump out.”

2.

Kimi to deatta toki (When I met you)

Kimi is a 2nd person singular pronoun. It’s not a formal pronoun and tends to refer to males. The context of this song leads me to believe that it’s in this case referring to a woman.

to is a post-position. It tends to be translated as “with,” but its function is to state that the noun accompanies something else in an operation, an operation described with the verb.

Deatta is a verb conjugated for the past, affirmative meaning “to meet by chance” (describing meeting someone unexpectedly for the first time.) These three words make up an inflexional phrase. Since it precedes a noun, it modifies the noun.

Toki is a noun meaning “time.” When it has an IP modifying it, it tends to be translated as “When [IP].”

Kodomo no koro taisetsu ni motteita basho wo omoidashita n da (It is that I remember a place that I held fondly (dear) when I was a child.)

Komodo is a noun meaning “child”

no is a genitive particle. “X no Y” tends to be translated, thus, as “Y of X.”

Koro is a noun meaning “time.” It takes the genitive to describe the time exact period, so in this case it’s the “time as a child”

Taisetsu is a noun meaning “important” or “fond.” In English it has an adjectival meaning but it is grammatically a noun in English.

ni is a suffix that makes the noun an adverb.

Motteita is a past progressive verb in the style of “hikareteku” in that the main verb is “iku.” “Motte” is the participial form of “motsu,” which means “to hold.”

Basho is a noun meaning “place.”

wo is an accusative particle. So this is the object of the next verb.

Omoidashita is a verb conjugated in the affirmative perfect (past) meaning “to remember.”

n is functionally a noun (I believe) but it carries no meaning in itself. All it does is allow us to use an IP as a noun. Here you’ll see me use the “It is” translation just to give it some representation.

Da is our copula, conjugated for the present, affirmative.

Boku to odotte kurenai ka (Will you dance with [me]?)

Boku is a first person singular pronoun, tends to denote masculinity.

to is the same “to” we saw before.

Odotte is the participial form of the verb “Odoru,” which means “to dance.” It’s in the participial form because it works alongside the next verb.

Kurenai is a verb conjugated in the negative, present meaning “to give.” When it is paired with the participial form of a verb, it means “to give (the speaker) X,” i.e. to do something for the speaker’s benefit. It’s in the negative conjugation because in an interrogative sentence, the negative can be an invitation.

ka is an interrogative particle. So this is the speaker asking to something.

Hikari to kage no WINDING ROAD, ima demo aitsu ni muchuu nano (On the winding road of light and shadow, even now [does there exist] a daze [in you] by that person]?)

Hikari is a noun meaning “light.”

to is the same as before.

Kage is a noun meaning “shadow.”

no is the same as before.

“Winding road” is English.

Imademo is an adverb meaning “even now.” It’s made up of the adverb “ima,” meaning “now,” and the conjunction “demo,” meaning “but.”

Aitsu is a 3rd person singular pronoun meaning “that person.”

ni is the same marker as before with basically the same function of agency. The difference here is that there is no verb.

Muchuu is a noun meaning “daze.”

Nano is a sentence ending that is a casual feminine version of “da ka.” So it’s a copula and an interrogative ending particle.

(Because there is no verb, we are going to write a faithful translation that’s clunky as all hell. What you’d want to do for a smoother translation is to make “muchuu” a verb.)

Sukoshi dake furimukitakunaru youna toki mo aru kedo (Despite there even being just a few times when I want to start to turn [start to want to turn] around)

Sukoshi is an adverb meaning “a little bit”

Dake is a restrictive noun suffix meaning “only”

Furimukitakunaru is a lot of things at once. We’ll look at things one by one. We’re looking at a conjunction of verbs that ends in “naru.” “Xnaru” tends to mean “to become” or “to start Xing.” “Taku” is the adverbial form of the “tai” conjugation of verbs. “Tai” is the desiderative mood, meaning it expresses desire. So “takunaru” is about “starting to want to” do something. Now we just have to deal with the meat and potatoes: “furimuki,” which is the stem of the verb “furimuku,” which means “to turn around.” So the whole thing means “to want to start to turn around.”

Youna is a na-adjective (but actually a verb) meaning “similar to.” It doesn’t have any meaning in itself, but connects an IP and a Noun, where the noun is “like” the IP.

Toki is the same as before. But “youna” is going to require us to translate it as “time” and not as “when.” We’ll say it is a “time like I wanted to turn around.”

Mo is a post-position that gets translated as “even.” It can be called a “supplemental” marker as well since it designates that the noun is not the only thing that can be the object of the verb.

aru is a copula. It and “iru” get translated often as “there is”

kedo is a conjugation that translates to “despite.”

Ai to yuuki to hokori wo motte tatakau yo (I hold onto love and courage and pride and fight!)

Ai is a noun meaning “love.”

to is the same as before

Yuuki is a noun meaning “courage.”

to is the same as before.

Hokori is a noun meaning “pride.”

wo is the same as before.

Motte is the participial form of “motsu,” meaning “to hold.” Using the pariticipial form before a definite verb is a way of conjoining those two verbs. So you do them both at the same time or in immediate succession.

Tatakau is a present, affirmative verb meaning “to fight.”

yo is an emphatic ending particle.

3.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

kono uchuu no kibou no kakera (The fragments of the hope of this universe)

Kono is an an adjective meaning “this”

Uchuu is a noun meaning “the universe”

no is the same as before.

Kibou is a noun meaning “hope.”

no is the same as before.

Kakera is a noun meaning “fragments”

Kitto daremo ga eien wo te ni iretai (Surely everybody wants to obtain eternity.)

Kitto is an adverb meaning “surely.”

daremo is a 3rd person plural pronoun meaning “everybody.”

ga is a nominative particle, meaning that it indicates the subject of the sentence.

Eien is a noun meaning “eternity.”

wo is the same as before.

Te is a noun meaning “hand.”

ni is the same as before.

iretai is the desiderative mood, present affirmative of the verb “ireru,” meaning “to put in.” The expression “te ni ireru” means “to obtain.” So we’ll translate it as such and not as “to put a hand in.”

Zen Zen ki ni shinai furi shitemo (Even if [I] pretend to not care at all)

Zen Zen is an adverb meaning “wholly.” When the verb it modifies is conjugated for negativity, we get “wholly not…” which normally gets translated to “not … at all.”

Ki is a noun meaning “energy.” It is going to be part of an expression.

ni is the same particle as before.

Shinai is the present, negative conjugation of the verb “suru.” “Ki ni suru” is an expression meaning “to care.”

Furishite is the participial form of “furi suru,” which means “to pretend.”

mo is the same as before. With this participle, it is a circumstantial clause, translating to “even if.”

Hora kimi ni koi shiteru (Look! I am in love with you.)

Hora is an interjection meaning “Look!”

Kimi is the same as before.

ni is the same as before, but here more of an ablative of accompaniment. So we’ll translate it as “with.”

koi is a noun meaning “love,” in a romantic sense.

shiteru is a contraction of “shite iru,” which is the present progressive conjugation of the verb “suru.” “Koi suru” means “to love.”

Hatenai kurayami kara tobidasou “Hold your hand” (Let us jump out of this darkness that does not end. Hold your hand.)

4.

Okotta kao mo tsukareteru kimi mo suki da kedo (Although I even like [your] face that got angry and even you when you are tired)

Okotta is the verb “okoru,” conjugated for the past, affirmative, meaning “to be angry.” This verb modifies the noun it precedes.

Kao is a noun meaning “face.”

mo is the same as before. It is substituting a nominative marker.

Tsukareteru is a contraction of “tsukarete iru,” meaning it is the present progressive of “tsukareru,” meaning “to get tired.”

Kimi is the same as before.

mo is the same as before. Both nouns, “kimi” and “kao” are the the subjects of the sentence.

Suki is a noun meaning “the thing that I like.” So here’s the deal. “X ga suki” tends to be translated as “[I] like X.” That words perfectly fine; but don’t get the idea that “suki” in Japanese is a verb just because of the translation.

Da is the copula conjugated for the present, affirmative.

Kedo is the same as before. Here we’re going to translate it as “Although.”

Anna ni tobashite ikite daijoubu ka na to omou (I wonder if living going fast to this extent is alright.)

Anna is an adjective (gasp) meaning “such.”

ni is the adverbial suffix. “Anna ni,” thus means “suchly” or, more colloqually, “to this/that extent.”

Tobashite is the participial form of the verb “tobasu.” “Tobasu” is the transitive counterpart of “tobu.” “Tobasu” does not only mean “to fly” but also “to go fast,” among other things. It is in the participial form because it is being compounded with “ikite”

ikite is the participial form of “ikiru,” which means “to live.” It is in the participial form because the following noun tends to take the participial form has its subject. (This happens sometimes.)

Daijoubu is a noun meaning “okay” or “alright.” What’s alright? The preceding IP.

ka is the interrogative ending particle.

Na is a dubitative ending particle.

to is the quotative particle.

Omou is a verb conjugated for the present, affirmative, meaning “to think [about something.]” or “to wonder” or “to consider.” Anything that appeals to the noetic should work just fine.

Boku wa nanigenai shigusa ni furimawasareteru (I am spun around by your casual actions)

Boku is the same as before.

wa is a topic marker.

Nanigenai is an i-adjective (but actually a verb) conjugated for the present, affirmative, meaning “casual.”

Shigusa is a noun meaning “action.” Here we will translate it as “actions.”

ni is the object marker for passive verbs.

Furimawasareteru is the passive, progressive, affirmative of “furimawasu” in a contracted state. “Furimawasu” means “for one’s steps to turn around” or “to spin around”

”Sea Side Blue”

Sore demo aitsu ni muchuu nano (Even still, [does there exist] a daze [in you] by that person]?)

Sore is a noun meaning “that thing.”

Demo is the same as before. This is another expression, “sore demo,” meaning “even so.”

Aitsu ni Muchuu Nano is the same as before.


Motto kikitai koto ga atta no ni (Despite me wanting to hear more.)

Motto is an adverb meaning “more.”

Kikitai is the verb “kiku,” meaning “to hear,” conjugated in the desiderative, present, affirmative. [grapefruitcake made the wise observation that “kiku” can also mean “to ask,” and you can translate it as such and it’s a legitimate option; but which way we’re supposed to take it ultimately is unknown because we’re not given much more context.]

Koto is a noun meaning “thing.”

ga is our subject marker.

Atta is a copula, “aru,” conjugated for the past, affirmative.

no is the same as the “n” we saw before. It makes an IP a noun.

ni is a conjunction. “No ni” translates to “despite [IP]

Futari no kaiwa ga kuruma no oto ni habamarete toori ni mau yo (Our conversation was interrupted by the sounds of cars and dances in the street.)

Futari is a noun meaning “two people,” in this context “the two of us.”

no is the genitive marker.

Kaiwa is a noun meaning “conversation.” So “our conversation”

ga is the same as before.

Kuruma is a noun meaning “car.”

no is the same as before.

Oto is a noun meaning “sound.” So “the sound of cars.”

ni is the marker for the object of a passive verb.

Habamarete is the passive, participial conjugation of the verb “habamu,” meaning “to interrupt.” What I will suggest here is that this participle be connected with the verb “mau” and that “toori ni” be taken as a separate Noun Phrase.

Toori is a noun meaning “street.”

ni is again a locative ablative. So it is telling us where all this is taking place.

Mau is a verb conjugated for the present, affirmative meaning “to dance.” “Odoru” traditionally means “to hop,” and “Mau” is more of a whirling thing. So that’s the nuance. What I believe is being suggested in this verse is that the conversation because one of many sounds on the street.

yo is the same as before.

5.

Dan Dan kokoro hikareteku (Slowly, you are charming my heart)

Jibun demo fushigi nanda kedo (Even though assuredly [it] is a miracle to me myself.)

Jibun is a first person, singular, reflexive pronoun meaning “myself.” It tends to be used as the indirect object. So we’ll use it as such.

demo is the same as before. Yet again, we have another expression: “Jibundemo,” meaning “I myself.”

fushigi is a noun meaning “miracle.”

nanda is an expression meaning “assuredly,” or can be translated verbally (WITH CAUTION) as “I’m sure.”

kedo is the same as before.

Nanika aru to ichusugu ni kimi ni denwa shitakunaru (If there is anything (if anything comes up), [i] Immediately want to start to call [start to want to call] you.)

Nanika is a pronoun meaning “anything.”

aru is a copula conjugated for the present, affirmative.

to is a conditional conjunction meaning “if.” It’s a very strong “if,” as well. So “X to, Y” implies that once X happens, Y will definitely happen

ichisugu is an adverb meaning “immediate.”

ni is the same adverb marker as before. So “immediately.”

kimi is the same as before.

ni is the indirect object marker.

denwa is a noun meaning “phone.” It’s also the direct object of the verb; but the direct object marker tends to be dropped or perhaps never existed in the first place.

shitakunaru is a verb mirroring another we’ve already seen before, because it is the adverbial form of the desiderative conjugation plus “naru,” which means “I want to start to X.” In this case, the verb is “suru.” The expression “denwa suru” means “to call by phone.”

Zen Zen ki no nai furi shitemo (Even if I pretend to be wholly indifferent.)

Ki no nai is the only difference between this verse and the fourth verse of the third starza. “Ki no nai” is an expression that means “indifferent,” or “half-hearted.”

Kekkyoku kimi no koto dake miteita (In the end, [I] was looking only at you.)

Kekkyoku is an adverb meaning “in the end.”

kimi is the same as before.

no is the genitive particle. (It might be the participle of the copula, but I’m not entirely sure it makes much of a difference right now. I also want to say that all genitive markers are just participles of the copula, but that’s another story.)

koto is the same as before. “Kimi no koto” translates “thing of you,” but it means “you.”

dake is the same as before.

miteita is the past, progressive, affirmative of “miru,” which means “to look at.”

Umi no kanata he tobidasou yo “Hold my hand” (Let us jump towards the other side of the ocean. Hold my hand.)

Umi is a noun meaning “ocean.”

no is the genitive particle.

kanata is a noun meaning “that way,” or, if you want to be technical, “the side that is not closest to here.” Here we can translate it at “the other side.”

he (which tends to be pronounced e, mind you) it a locative particle, which identifies motion towards. So the verb will be working towards this “other side of the ocean.”

tobidasou is the same as before. Here we can omit the “out” in our translation. Otherwise we would have to say “Let’s jump out [of one place] [and]…”

yo is the same as before.

“Hold my hand” is English.

“Moonlight Densetsu” (Sailor Moon Theme) (Part 3)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

Aaaand, we’re back! Part 3! So, without further ado!

ゴメンね 素直じゃなくて
Gomen ne sunao janakute
(Sorry, not being honest)

夢の中なら云える
Yume no naka nara ieru
(I can only tell you in a dream.)

思考回路はショート寸前
Shikou kairo wa shooto sunzen
(My train of thought is about to explode)
More literal: (My mental circuit is about to short)

今すぐ 会いたいよ
Ima sugu aitai yo
(I want to meet with you right away.)
Nicer English: (I want to see you right away.)

泣きたくなるようなmoonlight
Nakitaku naru you na moonlight
(At midnight I wanted to cry.)

電話も出来ないmidnight
Denwa mo dekinai midnight
(I couldn’t call you at midnight.)

だって純情 どうしよう
Datte junjou doushiyou
(However, I am pure hearted. What will I do?)

ハートは万華鏡
Haato wa mangekyou
(My heart is a kaleidoscope)

月の光に 導かれ
Tsuki no hikari ni michibikare

何度も 巡り会う
Nando mo meguriau

星座の瞬き数え 占う恋の行方
Seiza no matataki kazoe uranau koi no yukue

同じ地球に生まれたの ミラクル・ロマンス
Onaji kuni ni umareta no mirakuru romansu

信じているの ミラクル・ロマンス
Shinjite iru no mirakuru romansu

Let’s finish this!

月の光に 導かれ
Tsuki no hikari ni michibikare

We start off with a good old “X no Y” construction, meaning “Y of X”. Here X is “tsuki” and Y is “hikari”. “Tsuki” is “moon” and “hikari” is “light” (If any of you are Kingdom Hearts fans, you’ll remember the opening song Hikari, same word.) So, “The light of the moon”.
In order to understand what “ni” is doing here, we need to look at the verb: “michibikare”. The base form is “michibiku”. The “-are” suffix is from the passive conjugation. What does this mean? A passive form (or more technically the passive voice) is when the verb designates something happening to the subject rather than the subject doing. It’s the difference between “I ate the sandwich” and “The sandwich was eaten by me.” Here we have the later going on. “Ni”, then, becomes the indicator of the agent of the action. The agent is the one who does the action. In our example sentence, it’s that “by me” phrase.
“Michibiku” means “to guide”, “michibikare” means “to be guided”. BUT, there’s a catch here because “michibikare” is not conjugated as a normal finite verb because it lacks a “-ru” suffix. So what is it doing, exactly? When verbs show up without their “-ru” suffix, they act similar to the Te form of verb. What I recommend for translations is to translate it as a finite verb and add “and”.
The only last thing to discuss here is what the subject of the sentence is. It’s ambiguous. It can be “I” and it can be “my heart” if you want to go off the heart motif set up by the previous verse. I’ll leave that to you. I’ll choose the former.

“I am guided by the light of the moon and”

何度も 巡り会う
Nandomo meguriau

“Nandomo” is an adverb meaning “over and over”. It comes from “Nando” which is an interrogative pronoun meaning “how many?” and “mo” which is a particle meaning “also”. Lots of adverbs indicating multiplicity will have either “mo” or “demo” (If you’re a fan of Doraemon, you’ll recognize “demo” from the Dokodemo Door.)
“Meguriau” is a normal, finite, verb meaning “to meet fortuitously”, a lucky meeting.
“We meet fortuitously over and over.” You may want to chance “fortuitously” for “luckily” or “happily” in your own translation.

星座の瞬き数え 占う恋の行方
Seiza no matataki kazoe uranau koi no yukue

(There’s a space between “kazoe” and “uranau”, but that’s because, when sung, a pause goes there.)

This is the hard one of this set. Let’s just parse through it and then talk about it.
We’re back to our “X no Y” construction. Here our variables are “seiza” and “matataki”. “Seiza” here means “constellation”. (If you’re martial artists, you may remember that sitting/kneeling position you often assume is called “seiza”, but that’s just a homophone.) “Matataki” is “twinkling”. So, “The twinkling of the stars”
“Kazoe” is a non-finite verb, but it is in the active voice. Remember, if there’s no suffixes to indicate the contrary, you assume that the voice of the verb is active. (Active is the opposite of passive. “I ate the sandwich” has the verb in the active voice. It’s what we’re used to.) “Kazoe” means “to count”.
“Uranau” means “to predict”. It’s finite and active, totally normal.
“Koi” is a verb that means “love”.
“No” is doing its regular thing.
“Yukue” is a noun meaning “whearabouts” or “course”

Okay, so here’s why this is rather tough to translate: we’re missing particles and it’s jumbled up syntactically because it’s poetic. Here’s what we’ve got.
“The twinkling of the stars || counts and predicts || the whereabouts of love”
If this were a regular Japanese sentence, then we’d expect the verb to be at the end, and for there to be a “wo” after one of these noun phrases and a “ga” or “wa” after the other.Essentially, we need to decide what’s our direct object and what’s our subject. So the twinkling of the constellations predict the whereabouts of love or the whereabouts of love predict the twinkling of the constellations. The former makes more sense.

“The twinkling of the stars counts and predicts the whereabouts of love.”

(Don’t worry too much about the “counts” part. It’s really there just to emphasize that this prediction is arrived at through analysis, calculation, that kind of stuff.)

同じ地球に生まれたの ミラクル・ロマンス
Onaji kuni ni umareta no mirakuru romansu

“Onaji” is an adverb and it means “the same”. (Yes, in Japanese this is an adverb and not an adjective. There is a reason for this.)
“Kuni” means “the earth” or “the word” (Players of Ni no Kuni will remember this “Kuni”)
“Ni” here is our location marker. This is the one used when the action described by the verb is significantly contingent on the location. And in this case, Japanese considers this verb to be contingent on the location.
“Umareta” Is the finite, past conjugation of “umareru”, which means “to be born” (note that in the English translation it becomes passive).
“No” here is doing something poetic, viz. it’s indicating that what comes before it modifies what comes after it. It’s a kind of adjective particle here.
(Going back to Ni no Kuni for a moment to make my point, “Ni no Kuni” is supposed to mean “Second World”, but the normal way of saying “second” is not “Ni no”. “Ni” means “two”; and “no” is just making it an adjective.)
“Mirakuru romansu” is just “miracle romance”.
So how do we interpret this?

“The miracle romance that I was born in the same world” is one route.
The other is to keep it in its original syntax and add a comma, “I was born in the same world, miracle romance.”
Either way, it will sound a bit awkward.

信じているの ミラクル・ロマンス
Shinjite iru no mirakuru romansu

Here we learn of the progressive tense. (The progressive tense is the one in English that goes “is x-ing”.) The progressive tense it made through the combination of a verb in the Te form and the verb “iru”. Whether it’s present progressive or past progressive will depend on the tense of “iru”. The progressive tense is used in Japanese often to emphasize that something is taking place in the timeframe discussed because the future and present tenses in Japanese are one in the same. So, here we have “shinjite iru”, coming from “shinjiru”, meaning “to believe” or “to believe in”. If this just said “shinjiru” then it may sound like one will eventually believe, but not necessarily right now. If it’s right now, as we speak, then “shinjite iru”.
“No” here is doing the same thing as it was in the past verse, adjectivizing (if that’s a word).

“A miracle romance I believe in.”

Let’s put it all together!

ゴメンね 素直じゃなくて
Gomen ne sunao janakute
(Sorry, not being honest)

夢の中なら云える
Yume no naka nara ieru
(I can only tell you in a dream.)

考回路はショート寸前
Shikou kairo wa shooto sunzen
(My train of thought is about to explode)
More literal: (My mental circuit is about to short)

すぐ 会いたいよ
Ima sugu aitai yo
(I want to meet with you right away.)
Nicer English: (I want to see you right away.)

泣きたくなるようなmoonlight
Nakitaku naru you na moonlight
(At midnight I wanted to cry.)

電話も出来ないmidnight
Denwa mo dekinai midnight
(I couldn’t call you at midnight.)

だって純情 どうしよう
Datte junjou doushiyou
(However, I am pure hearted. What will I do?)

ハートは万華鏡
Haato wa mangekyou
(My heart is a kaleidoscope)

月の光に 導かれ
Tsuki no hikari ni michibikare
(I am guided by the light of the moon and)

何度も 巡り会う
Nando mo meguriau
(we fortuitously meet over and over.)

星座の瞬き数え   占う恋の行方
Seiza no matataki kazoe uranau koi no yukue
(The twinkling of the constellations count and predict the whereabouts of love.)

同じ地球に生まれたの ミラクル・ロマンス
Onaji kuni ni umareta no mirakuru romansu
([It is a] miracle romance that I was born in the same world.)

信じているの ミラクル・ロマンス
Shinjite iru no mirakuru romansu
([It is a] miracle romance I believe in.)

“Moonlight Densetsu” (Sailor Moon Theme) (Part 2)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

Part 2! If you haven’t seen Part 1, check the blog and read that first.

So, let’s recap real quick those first four lines.

ゴメンね 素直じゃなくて
Gomen ne sunao janakute
(Sorry, not being honest)

夢の中なら云える
Yume no naka nara ieru
(I can only tell you in a dream.)

思考回路はショート寸前
Shikou kairo wa shooto sunzen
(My train of thought is about to explode)
More literal: (My mental circuit is about to short)

今すぐ 会いたいよ
Ima sugu aitai yo
(I want to meet with you right away.)
Nicer English: (I want to see you right away.)

泣きたくなるようなmoonlight
Nakitaku naru you na moonlight

電話も出来ないmidnight
Denwa mo dekinai midnight

だって純情 どうしよう
Datte junjou doushiyou

ハートは万華鏡
Haato wa mangekyou

月の光に 導かれ
Tsuki no hikari ni michibikare

何度も 巡り会う
Nando mo meguriau

星座の瞬き数え 占う恋の行方
Seiza no matataki kazoe uranau koi no yukue

同じ地球に生まれたの ミラクル・ロマンス
Onaji kuni ni umareta no mirakuru romansu

信じているの ミラクル・ロマンス
Shinjite iru no mirakuru romansu

Now let’s do four more lines!

泣きたくなるようなmoonlight
Nakitaku naru you na moonlight

(You’ll notice that I actually had to correct something from my source in this verse. I simply had to add a “う” between “よ” and “な”.)
Our first word is “Naritaku”. This is, believe it or not, a verb in -tai form. You’ll remember that we said that -tai verbs acts like adjectives with that -i ending being like the -i’s in adjectives and declining as such. Well, here that -i has done something that adjectives can do, which is turn into adverb by becoming -ku. (So we have Naku->Nakitai->Nakitaku). “Naku”, the base verb, means “to cry”, and the desiderative form would mean “I want to cry”, but what would it mean in an adverbial form?
Well, we don’t have to worry about that because of what follows: “naru”. “x+ ku (adverbial suffix) + naru” means “becomes x ”, so this means “becomes I want to cry”. That makes no sense in English. And that’s a big problem with “naru”, that for the sake of translation you have to do a bit of interpretation. But let’s hold off on the interpretation for the end of the verse.
Our next puzzle is “you na”, which is a “dependent adjective”, all that means is that it has the properties of an adjective but its meaning is dependent on what comes before it. “x no you na y” means “y like an x”. That’s all.
So, if we put these things together, we get something like “moonlight like I become I want to cry.” That makes no sense, yet. But let’s think about this for a moment. Our main noun, is “moonlight” and because we have no verb we can use a copula. So, “[It] is the moonlight…”. Now, believe it or not, all adjectives are dependent clauses of the kind “x that is y” in which y is an adjective. “The blue bird” is just another way of saying “The bird that is blue”. So let’s see if we can use that somehow: “[It] is the moonlight that becomes I want to cry”. Now it becomes clear that the moonlight leads to wanting to cry: and that’s the idea behind this verse. It may sound awful in direct translation, but it makes sense after some thought. So how to we translate this? I propose we use: “It is the moonlight that makes me want to cry.” In English, because copulas are generally frowned upon, you can say “The moonlight makes me want to cry” with poetic license.

電話も出来ないmidnight
Denwa mo dekinai midnight

This one is much easier. “Denwa” means “phone”.
“Mo” is a particle that substitutes “ga”, “wa”, and “wo” in order to say “also”. In this case, it’s substituting “wo”.
“Dekinai” Is the negative form of “dekiru”, which means, “can”. This verb, “dekiru”, serves as the potential form (we talked about it as having the -eru ending) of “suru”, which we know means “to do”. “Denwa wo suru”, means “to phone” someone. Now in potential-negative form, it means “cannot phone”.
Now we just need to remember that the negative form of verbs acts like an adjective and that adjectives go before the nouns they are modifying in Japanese. That’s what’s happening here with “midnight”. So, like in the last verse, this is “the midnight that I cannot call you”. If you want you make it prettier English like last time, you can say “I cannot call you at midnight.”

だって純情 どうしよう
Datte junjou doushiyou

“Datte” is the Te-form of the copula “da”. This is used as an expression, an equivalent to “however”. (We see something similar in English in contrafactual statements such as “Being good, he still a lot of bad in him.”)
“Junjou” is an noun that is often paired with “na” to become an adjective. It means “pure hearted” to the point of naïveté.
Then we have the expression “Doushiyou”, made up of two parts. “Dou” means “what?” in a reflexive sense. And “shiyou” is an exhortative form (there are a few exhortative forms) of “suru”. “What?/do!” becomes “What will I do?”
“However, pure hearted. What will I do?”
Because we’ve been presuming we’re in the first person and we can buy a copula, we can tune this up to “However, I am pure hearted. What will I do?”

ハートは万華鏡
Haato wa mangekyou

“Haato” means “heart”. It’s an adoption of the English word. This is where you ask if Japanese has a word for “heart”. Kind of. The poetic heart, the one that’s not a beating organ, is “kokoro” (心), but it primarily means “mind” and isn’t as cute as “haato”, which has a ring of innocence.
“Wa” is our subject marker.
“Mangekyou” means “kaleidoscope”. All you Naruto fans will recognize this word from the “Mangekyou Sharingan”, which is called a kaleidoscope because of the funky designs they carry that resemble a kaleidoscope.
So, “[My] heart is a kaleidoscope.”

Let’s recap:
Sorry, not being honest
I can tell you only in a dream.
My mental circuit is about to short.
I want to see you right away.
The moonlight makes me want to cry.
I cannot call you at midnight.
However, I am pure hearted. What will I do?
My heart is a kaleidoscope…

We’ll finish this off next time. Till then!

“Moonlight Densetsu” (Sailor Moon Theme) (Part 1)

The following is an unedited post created on our Tumblr page. You may find the original here.

This iconic opening theme from Sailor Moon is called “Moonlight Densetsu” (伝説), meaning Moonlight Legend. Like most op’s, it is longer than the actual opening of the show, meaning it’s clipped in certain parts. We’ll taking a look at what made it into the opening, which are the first two stanzas and the final verse.

ゴメンね 素直じゃなくて
Gomen ne sunao janakute

夢の中なら云える
Yume no naka nara ieru

思考回路はショート寸前
Shikou kairo wa shooto sunzen

今すぐ 会いたいよ
Ima sugu aitai yo

泣きたくなるよなmoonlight
Nakitaku naru you na moonlight

電話も出来ないmidnight
Denwa mo dekinai midnight

だって純情 どうしよう
Datte junjou doushiyou

ハートは万華鏡
Haato wa mangekyou

月の光に 導かれ
Tsuki no hikari ni michibikare

何度も 巡り会う
Nando mo meguriau

星座の瞬き数え 占う恋の行方
Seiza no matataki kazoe uranau koi no yukue

同じ地球に生まれたの ミラクル・ロマンス
Onaji kuni ni umareta no mirakuru romansu

信じているの ミラクル・ロマンス
Shinjite iru no mirakuru romansu
That’s what we have to tackle. So, let’s get to it!

ゴメンね 素直じゃなくて
Gomen ne sunao janakute

“Gomen ne” is a two-part expression. “Gomen” is equivalent to English’s “sorry”. “Ne” here is an ending particle that softens what’s been said previously. It also seeks affirmation. So when you say “Gomen ne”, you’re indirectly for someone to forgive you.

“Sunao” is an adjective. It means “honest”.

“Janakute” has a lot of things going on. Let’s talk about them bit by bit. In Japanese, adjectives are denied by adding the suffix “janai”. “Janai” once upon a time was “ga nai”. You’ll remember that “ga” is the subject marker. “Nai” is the negative form of “aru”, which is one of our copulas (our “is” verbs). So, it basically means “is not”. [Yumei= famous || Yumeijanai= is not famous]. But because that ending is really a verb, it has the properties of a verb, including its conjugations. So, yes, adjectives conjugate in Japanese! What’s going on here? This a Te-form. Te-forms, you will remember, are when a verb starts acting like a participle (lots of English’s -ing words are participles). Long story short, this is denying the adjective “honest” as a participle.

“Sorry, not being honest”

夢の中なら云える
Yume no naka nara ieru

“Yume” means “Dream”, that’s easy.

“Naka” means “middle”. “No” connects both words, meaning we’re in a genitive construction. Same rules apply: “X no Y” translates to “Y of X”.
So, “Middle of a dream”. But “no naka” is also a common expression, which often simply means “in” and doesn’t carry the same meanings as English’s “In the middle of”.

“Nara” is a conditional conjunction, a form of saying “if”. (A lot of the time it’ll be a strong conditional, almost an “if and only if”.)

“Ieru” brings us to another dimension of verbs. Japanese has a potential conjugation made by the suffix “-eru”, normally, main, definite verbs will only end in -u or -ru. But when you want to express potential (can x), then you use the “-eru” suffix. That “-ru” in “-eru”, then becomes the thing that changes for all the other conjugations you might want to give it. So you can put it in the -Te form by saying “iete” or negative + -Te form by saying “ienakute”– all that is possible. Okay, back to “Ieru”. It’s normal form is “Iu”, which means “to say”. In potential form, it means “can say”.

Since we have no subject in this sentence, we’re going to assume it’s 1st person.

“If in the middle of a dream, I can say it.”**

** Because we’re using “nara” and “nara” is stronger than a simple “if”, then you might want to say “Only if I’m in the middle of a dream, I can say it.”

思考回路はショート寸前
Shikou kairo wa shooto sunzen

“Shikou kairo” is a compound word meaning “train of thought”. But let’s look at both words. “Shikou” means thoughts. “Kairo” is actually an electrical circuit. This is important for the next word.

“Wa” is the topic particle.

“Shooto” is Japanese’s adoption of the word “short circuit” to mean “to short”. This makes sense when we consider that “kairo” is an electrical circuit. It just makes poetic sense.

“Sunzen” is a suffix more than a conjunction (I feel, but it depends on the positioning” and it means “on the verge of”.

We’ll add a 1st person perspective to this and because of “sunzen” we’ll make “shooto”, which is technically not a verb, into our verb in our translation. (If you want to make a very pretty translation, you might consider changing “short” for “explode”)

“[My] train of thought on the verge of shorting”

今すぐ 会いたいよ
Ima sugu aitai yo

“Ima sugu” is another two-part expression. “Ima” means now. “Sugu” means “at once”. “Now at once” is equivalent to “right away”.

“Aitai” has a new conjugation we haven’t spoken of. “-itai” is the conjugation of the desiderative form! Desiderative is just a fancy word for “desiring”. When you want something, you use “-itai”. The base form is “au”, which means “to meet”, “aitai”, then, means “I want to meet”.  (It’s also important to note that “-itai” is used exclusively for one’s own desires. If one wants to talk about someone else’s desires, one uses a different construction. Further, there is another way of expressing one’s desires which is very common, where one says something like “I’d like to see if I could do x” because “-itai” is a very strong statement.)

“Yo” is another ending particle. This one is exhortative, kind of like an exclamation mark. It also indicates that this is information that the speaker wants the interlocutor to remember. (It’s kind of like Ebonic’s “yo”.)

“I want to meet with you right away!”

That’s all for now. I’ll see you all later!